CivicMedia/Minnesota Archive

Here you can find a listing of all shows ...

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

The annual Freedom of Information Day is upon us March 16, sponsored by the Minnesota Council on Government information (MN-COGI). You'd think this would not be a necessary day, but government at all levels, remains hell-bent on classifying or labeling as private or secret or confidential much of the information that should be made public. Freedom of Information Day is also the time when MN-COGI presents its annual John R. Finnegan Freedom of Information Award, given to an individual whose work is dedicated to opening up government and the public realm to all of us.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

TTT revisits Xcel Energy's Hiawatha Project continuing push to place electrical substations at Hiawatha Avenue and high-voltage lines over the Midtown Greenway. Despite reams of testimony and several ”Friend of the Court” briefs being filed in what's called a contested case, Xcel persists in its claim that additional capacity is needed in this area of the city. The guardians of that recessed corridor of walking and biking trails along the old railroad right-of-way north of Lake Street through the heart of South Minneapolis to the Mississippi, the Midtown Greenway Coalition (MGC), essentially say, Prove it. 

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Back in January, we talked about the surge in cases of Lyme Disease – the seemingly innocuous infection from the bite of a deer tick - the near-microscopic cousin to the larger wood tick – both of them flourishing in the Minnesota outdoors. We featured several advocates – including a physician and patients who insist that the chronic form of Lyme Disease is not only possible, but far too common to be ignored, as they claim the mainline medical community has. And, although the stories about real people in very real suffering keep mounting, and more doctors appear to be bucking the system guidelines that say chronic Lyme cannot be real, medical journals and professionals in the government sector and private practice cling to guidelines that insist that what others call chronic Lyme are really other kinds of infection and that the accepted scientific studies refute the chronic believers’ claims.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN revisit our Lyme Disease conversation for some answers to these questions.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Back in January, we talked about the surge in cases of Lyme Disease – the seemingly innocuous infection from the bite of a deer tick - the near-microscopic cousin to the larger wood tick – both of them flourishing in the Minnesota outdoors. Depending on who’s talking, Lyme Disease is either a brief, but eminently treatable infection – caused when the deer tick burrows into the skin and deposits the bacteria known as Borrelia burgdorferi – or, undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, a potentially dangerous and chronic condition eventually undermining several of the body’s important functions.

Back in January, we featured several advocates – including a physician and patients who insist that the latter – the chronic form – is not only possible, but far too common to be ignored, as they claim the mainline medical community has. And, although the stories about real people in very real suffering keep mounting, and more doctors appear to be bucking the system guidelines that say chronic Lyme cannot be real, medical journals and professionals in the government sector and private practice cling to guidelines that insist that what others call chronic Lyme are really other kinds of infection and that the accepted scientific studies refute the chronic believers’ claims.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

From all indications, we can't take the need for an accurate count of all our state's residents too seriously. At stake could be the millions of federal dollars and, ultimately, the strength of our representation in Washington DC. An undercount could reduce the size of Minnesota's Congressional delegation: we're on the cusp of losing one of our eight seats in the House of Representatives if our real numbers fail to meet the threshold - as few as 1,100 people undercounted. Many communities - especially students and suspicious minority and immigrant communities - are badly undercounted - and for good reason: few people trust the government. Period.

Advocates and community representatives are scouring neighborhoods for every person to complete the Census form when it arrives at each household, especially in the Twin Cities where many new Americans and minority community people may need convincing that this is an important time to be counted. Meetings are held. Jobs offered. Speeches made. An all-out campaign to be included.

TTT's ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN explore the issues and why this decade's Census is one of the more critical in our state's history.

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Despite the significant trend away from family farming in Minnesota and elsewhere - for many reasons giving way to the power of (often polluting and environmentally unsound) corporate farming enterprises, chemical companies and federal farm policies, Minnesota is showing growth in small to mid-sized family farms. Why? Because we are blessed by a surge in farms run by minority and immigrant families as a counterweight to the massive feedlots, bio-fed livestock, and chemically infused fruit and vegetable crops. Most of us now know that farmers' markets are multiplying throughout our cities, providing us with farm-to-table fresh and nutritionally better foods. Again, we can thank enlightened organic farmers who practice strong, sustainable and healthy alternatives to the highly processed foods peddled in most of our supermarkets.

ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with some of the key players in this excellent movement toward a resurgence of family farms and healthy eating.

GUESTS:

GLEN HILL - Executive Director, Minnesota Food Association

NIGATU TADESSE - USDA–Farm Service Agency

RODRIGO CALA - Latino Farmer

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

January 14, 2012: Yesterday, knowing the end was near, lifelong peace and justice activist Marv Davidov surrounded himself with family and several friends from the old trenches to say goodbye, even to talk briefly with a reporter from the StarTribune. Partying along and celebrating their time together, he died later that day, no regrets for almost al of it, save, perhaps for the successes that elude us all in a culture of war and corporate greed. Most of us will depart this vale having failed to effect all of the change we know to be necessary for a people's survival, but many of us will simply run out of the intellectual and emotional energy that never left Davidov, despite his failing body.

Just over two years ago, Davidov and his collaborator and close ally and friend, Carol Masters penned his biography, You Can't Do That! A perfect title for a lifetime of resistance. Posted below is the original airing of the interview we recorded with Marv and Carol a few days earlier. Ever up to his wisecracks, Marv tells his story

November 25, 2009:

Andy Driscoll probes the mind and motives of Marv Davidov – a near icon of nonviolent resistance and revolution here, but also everywhere across the country for nearly 57 years. Known primarily in these parts – at least among the general public – as the founding inspiration for the war-resistant action group, The Honeywell Project.

Starting in 1968 and 1969, dozens of Project protestors were arrested after jumping the fences during demonstrations against Minneapolis Honeywell’s Defense Systems division in Minneapolis railing against that company’s manufacture of the cluster bomb – a nasty little device that, when lobbed into an area where people congregate – soldiers or civilians - would detonate and scatter-shoot thousands of shotgun pellet-type missiles to maximize its kill of human beings, not just to destroy military buildings or materiel. Of course, its greatest impact was almost always on civilians, theoretically not an announced target in wars between military powers.

The Honeywell Project and its latest incarnation now known as the Alliant Technology Resistance have hammered on war materiel manufacturing around here for 40 years. But Marv Davidov, despite his loss of kidney function and under dialysis three hours a day, three days per week, hangs in there – not always everyone’s darling, but admired by all for his persistence and his courage in the face of violent counterforce over the last half-century. His dialysis on Wednesdays at our usual broadcast time forced us to pre-record Marv and his biographer, Carol Masters, between dialysis days. We sat down with them yesterday, and to no one’s surprise, Marv was ever on his game.

Before the Honeywell Project, Marv’s was a deep background of nonviolent revolution in the 50’s and 60s – including Freedom Rider work to Mississippi and prison, then, later, walking from Canada to Cuba right at about the time of the Bay of Pigs debacle during the Kennedy Administration. That walk brought more grief, pain and jailings from white supremacists in still-rebellious Georgia as the marcher tried combining civil rights in the US with peace promotion toward Cuba. Marv spins his tails and we hear excerpts from Carol Masters’ biography, Marv Davidov: You Can’t Do That!

Guests:

MARV DAVIDOV - Nonviolent Revolutionary, Peace and Social Justic Advocate, Founder, The Honeywell Project

CAROL MASTERS - Peace and Social Justic Advocate, collaborator, Marv Davidov: You Can’t Do That!