TTT newsletter archives

Here is an archive list of all published newsletter issues with the most recent issue listed first.

TruthToTell, Monday July 15, Encore - TruthToTell: Community Connections- Insert Your Ideas Here- The Twin Cities Youth Empowerment Forum

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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VIDEO: YouTube or watch our broadcast on SPNN St. Paul cable channel 19 or MTN Minneapolis cable channel 16 at 8pm CST, Monday, July 15. 

 


AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!

That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

 


In the sixth edition of the TruthToTell:Community Connections Series*, we look to the youth.TruthToTell's Michelle Alimoradi and special guest RayLynn Prokasky will host a conversation at St Paul's Avalon Charter School on Wednesday, July 10 about how to help youth help themselves. In this era of rapidly changing technology, widening access to information, an unsure economic future, and drastically changing ethnic and racial demographics, is it time to start radically rethinking our systems for preparing and supporting young people? Do we rely on test scores and statistics to tell us what's wrong? Or should we go straight to the source and ask youth what they want to achieve? Local researchers, including the McKnight foundation’s recent spin-off Youthprise, are saying that perhaps it's a mix of both, but this Wednesday night, we'll talk to members of the community, particularly the younger Twin Cities residents, find out what they think.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

Vested community members of all ages are welcome to attend this open forum discussion as we help youth define the terms of their own success, discuss what's working, and what barriers still exist for youth struggling to achieve their goals. TTT has teamed up with St. Paul Parks & Recreation's Youth Job Corps program, Minneapolis Step-Up, Youthprise, St. Paul Sprockets, The Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College, Youth Express, and Cookie Cart as well as our production partners St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) and KFAI Fresh Air Radio to bring you this special discussion.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

 

TruthToTell, Wednesday July 10, TruthToTell: Community Connections- Insert Your Ideas Here- The Twin Cities Youth Empowerment Forum

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!

That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

 


In the sixth edition of the TruthToTell:Community Connections Series*, we look to the youth.TruthToTell's Michelle Alimoradi and special guest RayLynn Prokasky will host a conversation at St Paul's Avalon Charter School on Wednesday, July 10 about how to help youth help themselves. In this era of rapidly changing technology, widening access to information, an unsure economic future, and drastically changing ethnic and racial demographics, is it time to start radically rethinking our systems for preparing and supporting young people? Do we rely on test scores and statistics to tell us what's wrong? Or should we go straight to the source and ask youth what they want to achieve? Local researchers, including the McKnight foundation’s recent spin-off Youthprise, are saying that perhaps it's a mix of both, but this Wednesday night, we'll talk to members of the community, particularly the younger Twin Cities residents, find out what they think.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

Vested community members of all ages are welcome to attend this open forum discussion as we help youth define the terms of their own success, discuss what's working, and what barriers still exist for youth struggling to achieve their goals. TTT has teamed up with St. Paul Parks & Recreation's Youth Job Corps program, Minneapolis Step-Up, Youthprise, St. Paul Sprockets, The Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College, Youth Express, and Cookie Cart as well as our production partners St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) and KFAI Fresh Air Radio to bring you this special discussion.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

On-air guests: 

 

Caritza Mariani- Caritza directs youth work for the Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College.
Jeron Mariani- Jeron Mariani is a 2013 graduate of Saint Paul Academy, a Board Member and Leadership Team member of Youthrive, a youth leadership-based nonprofit organization that focuses on peace-building skills following the vision of Nobel Peace Laureates.
Rhiannon Magee- Rhiannon is an entering sophomore at Avalon High School, an active member of the student congress, and active volunteer in her community serving at the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota (DSAM) and the AFS study abroad program.
Invited: Marcus Pope- Director or Strategic Outreach and Initiatives for Youthprise. Marcus has a rich background in nonprofit management, youth development and community outreach. 

 

Caritza Mariani- Caritza directs youth work for the Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College.

 

Jeron Mariani- Jeron Mariani is a 2013 graduate of Saint Paul Academy, a Board Member and Leadership Team member of Youthrive, a youth leadership-based nonprofit organization that focuses on peace-building skills following the vision of Nobel Peace Laureates.

 

Rhiannon Magee- Rhiannon is an entering sophomore at Avalon High School, an active member of the student congress, and active volunteer in her community serving at the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota (DSAM) and the AFS study abroad program.

Invited: Marcus Pope- Director or Strategic Outreach and Initiatives for Youthprise. Marcus has a rich background in nonprofit management, youth development and community outreach. 

*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

 

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.Caritza Mariani- Caritza directs youth work for the Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College.Jeron Mariani- Jeron Mariani is a 2013 graduate of Saint Paul Academy, a Board Member and Leadership Team member of Youthrive, a youth leadership-based nonprofit organization that focuses on peace-building skills following the vision of Nobel Peace Laureates.Rhiannon Magee- Rhiannon is an entering sophomore at Avalon High School, an active member of the student congress, and active volunteer in her community serving at the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota (DSAM) and the AFS study abroad program.Invited: Marcus Pope- Director or Strategic Outreach and Initiatives for Youthprise. Marcus has a rich background in nonprofit management, youth development and community outreach. 

UPDATE TruthToTell, Monday July 8 - 9AM: CHATs and THE BACKYARD INITIATIVE: Community Health Building-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Born with seed money from the Midtown headquarters of Allina Health Systems (which community folk boast is in their backyard), the system known as the Cultural Wellness Center (CWC), a broadbased effort with a mission “to unleash the power of citizens to heal themselves and to build community.” Community Action Health Teams, or CHATs were developed to help nurture the mission across a wide swath of both Minneapolis and St. Paul.

From this base came the Back Yard Initiative covering seven primary neighborhoods of Southeast Minneapolis (Powderhorn, Corcoran, Central and the four Phillips neighborhoods of West, East, Midtown and Ventura Village) and over 15,000 households. The BYI fostered what they call their three pillars of community health –Community’s Commission on Health (Leadership), the Community Resource Body (Economic leveraging) and several CHATs.

Three BYI CHATs will visit TruthToTell this week to talk about their work: Anchor FamiliesProject S.E.L.F., and the Communities of Light (part of the Rebirthing Communities CHAT). This whole thing can sort of blow you away with its complexities because the sheer diversity of people and CHAT programs cover almost every facet of community health stabilization.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL talks with key members of those three BYI CHATs and we’ll hear some African drumming, along with announcements of the annual Midtown Global Market Music Festival July 13th and the separate Midtown Phillips Festival coming up on July 20.

On-air guests:

KHUSABA SEKA – Representing Anchor Families CHAT


AMGED YUSUF – Representing Project S.E.L.F. (Save, Educate, Liberate and Free) CHAT (with BROTHER MAO on Drum)

 

 

 

QUEEN INSHALLAH EMPRESS AMIT – Representing Communities of Light, part of the Rebirthing Communities CHAT


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SUSAN GUST – The Alley Newspaper – Communications CHAT

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DAN WILDER – Representing the Midtown Phillips Festival

AND YOU!!! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices. DOWNLOAD IT NOW!

 

 

 

TruthToTell, Monday July 8 - 9AM: CHATs and THE BACKYARD INITIATIVE: Community Health Building; TruthToTell, July 1: MINNESOTA MARIJUANA: Medical and Moral Dilemma

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, July 8, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US with Just $10 – DONATE HERE!

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Sometimes one is brought up short by the sheer numbers of remarkable efforts of Twin Cities communities or neighborhoods to improve life and return to the same level of collective existence under which almost all of our forebears operated, sometime in small towns, sometimes in ethnic and spiritual enclaves within very large cities, sometimes in small fiefdoms in developing areas of the world. Such is the case with the Back Yard Initiative (BYI) in South Minneapolis.

The American experience, we can admit, especially now as we examine our cultural and political history in light of the near two and a half centuries of what the colonial system brought forth to this nation. We say, examine less than universally celebrate because not all parts of what has always purported to be cemented equity in our Constitution has borne the fruits of that equity in reality.

There’s more to be said about that, of course, but the one ingredient lost since pioneer families settled these lands and worked side-by-side to create communities of immigrants, often at the expense of the Natives already planted there, was the sense that to really accomplish the better life for their members and their offspring, functions of a society were necessarily collective efforts, not characterized by the individualism that has rent us from each other over time, too many left to fend for themselves in a so-called democracy gone rogue. And, so, any effort to reestablish the connectedness needed to maintain the health of communities, some of them neglected in the extreme, has to be welcome in those urban places where the difficulties of existence multiply too quickly.

So was revived the concept of the Back Yard and how that symbolizes this return to collective action for community benefits and, while this may take place in some other places around the Twin Cities Metro and other locales, the Back Yard Initiative of South Minneapolis emerges as an extraordinary example of how neighborhood and community folks can come together in pockets of human endeavor to build the better overall health of the entire area – physically

Born with seed money from the Midtown headquarters of Allina Health Systems (which community folk boast is in their backyard), the system known as the Cultural Wellness Center (CWC), a broadbased effort with a mission “to unleash the power of citizens to heal themselves and to build community.” Community Action Health Teams, orCHATs were developed to help nurture the mission across a wide swath of both Minneapolis and St. Paul.

From this base came the Back Yard Initiative covering seven primary neighborhoods of Southeast Minneapolis (Powderhorn, Corcoran, Central and the four Phillips neighborhoods of West, East, Midtown and Ventura Village) and over 15,000 households. The BYI fostered what they call their three pillars of community health – Community’s Commission on Health (Leadership), the Community Resource Body (Economic leveraging) and severalCHATs.

Three BYI CHATs will visit TruthToTell this week to talk about their work: Anchor Families, Project S.E.L.F., and the Communities of Light (part of the Rebirthing Community CHAT). This whole thing can sort of blow you away with its complexities because the sheer diversity of people and CHAT programs cover almost every facet of community health stabilization.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL talks with key members of those three BYI CHATs and we’ll hear some African drumming, along with announcements of the annual Midtown Global Market Music Festival July 13th and the separate Midtown Phillips Festival coming up on July 20.

GUESTS:

KHUSABA SEKA – Representing Anchor Families CHAT

AMGED YUSEF – Representing Project S.E.L.F. CHAT (with BROTHER MAO on Drum)

 

 

 


QUEEN INSHALLAH TOLBERT – Representing Communities of Light, part of the Rebirthing Communities CHAT

 

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PLUS

SUSAN GUST – The Alley Newspaper – Communications CHAT

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

DAN WILDER – Representing the Midtown Phillips Festival

AND YOU!!! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, July 1, 2013

 

HELP US INFORM YOU  – DONATE HERE!

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VIDEO OF THIS SHOW HERE and HERE

 

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

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Some questions begging for your comments. Listen to or watch our show and answerthese questions in our survey - or in our comments section or email them to andydriscoll@TruthToTell.org. We'll make sure our guests and their organizations and the policymakers get your answers:

1. Do you support medical marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

2. Do you support recreational use of marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

3. Have you tried marijuana?  If so, what was your experience? Answer HERE.

4. Has the War on Drugs hurt our society or helped our society?  Yes / No Why? Answer HERE.

5. What do you think of private prisons lobbying against the legalization of marijuana? Answer HERE.

6. Henry Ford made a car from hemp fibers.  He said, "Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?" Should this be considered for future policies on marijuana?  Answer HERE.

7. Is there an aspect to the legalization of marijuana discussion that is missing?  If so, what is it?  Answer HERE.

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What a difference a year can make.

When last we visited this issue of marijuana legalization, we tapped the Minnesota Chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) to explain just why this controversial weed, as many call it, should be legalized or decriminalized in this state. We come back to this not because of any major shift in state policy –yet – but because the subject has again gained currency with both the introduction of medial marijuana bills here and the passage of significant changes in four other states last Fall.

Although some state legislatures– twelve this year to be exact – have either affirmatively rejected or allowed to die bills to legalize even the medical use of cannabis, last fall three states’ electorates voted not only to decriminalize marijuana, they passed initiatives or referenda legalizing its regulated recreational use. Montana and Massachusetts passed medical marijuana reform initiatives. And Colorado and Washington legalized personal use of marijuana outright for those 21 and over.

Bills to authorize medical marijuana in Minnesota, introduced in both houses last Session (SF 1641/HF 1818), remain in their respective Health and Human Services committees, because they were introduced too late in the session, but because Minnesota works on a biennial legislative calendar, the bills stay alive through next year's session.

At the moment, Minnesota ranks the personal possession or sale of less than 1.5 ounces or 42.5 grams of marijuana a misdemeanor calling for a maximum $200 penalty, dischargeable for first “offenders.” Anything more than that amount and possession and sales become felonies and the penalties, depending on the quantity and where you’ve bought and/or sold it can go through the roof – anywhere from 5 years and $5,000 to 30 years and $1 million.

Tough stuff for a drug that’s been described as tame compared with the ramifications of alcohol use and abuse. Yes, alcohol. According to NORML, which some will dispute, such agencies as the National Academy of Sciences, the Connecticut Law Review Commission and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan all found that decriminalization causes no substantial increase either in marijuana use or the use of other substances, including alcohol. The British, Dutch and Australians concluded much the same.

This begs the question of what effect the entire so-called Drug War industry is having on public policy and therefore public opinion.

It should be noted that five Mayo physicians issued one warning just a couple of weeks ago that “An increasingly available option for medical patients suffering chronic pain -- medical marijuana -- should be avoided by teens.” However, it also states that their commentary  – “…to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings – relies on findings from cases involving three high school-age patients at Mayo's pediatric chronic pain clinic, who said they used marijuana regularly.” Note that this data comes from the experience of three teen patients.

It would take several pages (hours) to quote studies done in the US and Europe that refute the claims of those who denounce even the use of small amounts as “reefer madness” setting in, corrupting our children and inviting rapid addiction to the worst of the controlled substances, such as heroin and cocaine.

We thought it worthwhile to come back to this subject after last Fall’s election and this last Minnesota Legislative session’s introduction of measures to legalize medical marijuana, and this time to bring one of the suffering witnesses from that session’s testimony to talk to us about his experience as well.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI quiz the patient, the state senator and some other advocates and observers over the momentum behind medical marijuana as well as the hopes for complete decriminalization in Minnesota.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR SCOTT DIBBLE (DFL-Mpls 61) – Author, Medical Marijuana Senate File 1641; Chair, Transportation and Public Safety Committee and Chair of Transportation and Public Safety Division of Finance. (Sen. Dibble also authored the Marriage for All bill.)

KURTIS HANNA –  Executive Director, MN NORML

 

 

 

KATIE RUCKE – Editorial Assistant and Staff Writer, Mint Press News – specializing in health, criminal justice, education, whistleblowers and watchdog investigations.

PATRICK McCLELLAN, Burnsville – Sufferer from mitochondrial myopathy, a rare, genetic muscular disorder that causes severe, painful spasms.


 

TruthToTell, Monday, July 1−9AM: MINNESOTA MARIJUANA: Medical and Moral Dilemma; TruthToTell, June 24: ENCORE: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS V: Deeper Issues of Sulfide Mining – Audio and Video BELOW

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, July 1, 2013

 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 


What a difference a year can make.

When last we visited this issue of marijuana legalization, we tapped the Minnesota Chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) to explain just why this controversial weed, as many call it, should be legalized or decriminalized in this state. We come back to this not because of any major shift in state policy –yet – but because the subject has again gained currency with both the introduction of medial marijuana bills here and the passage of significant changes in four other states last Fall.

Although some state legislatures– twelve this year to be exact – have either affirmatively rejected or allowed to die bills to legalize even the medical use of cannabis, last fall three states’ electorates voted not only to decriminalize marijuana, they passed initiatives or referenda legalizing its regulated recreational use. Montana and Massachusetts passed medical marijuana reform initiatives. And Colorado and Washington legalized personal use of marijuana outright for those 21 and over.

Minnesota hasn’t gone anywhere near that far. Bills to authorize medical marijuana in Minnesota, introduced in both houses last Session (SF 1641/HF 1818), failed to exit their respective Health and Human committees, despite Minnesota’s status as still having active bills, likely because we work on a biennial legislative

At the moment, Minnesota ranks the personal possession or sale of less than 1.5 ounces or 42.5 grams of marijuana a misdemeanor calling for a maximum $200 penalty, dischargeable for first “offenders.” Anything more than that amount and possession and sales become felonies and the penalties, depending on the quantity and where you’ve bought and/or sold it can go through the roof – anywhere from 5 years and $5,000 to 30 years and $1 million.

Tough stuff for a drug that’s been described as tame compared with the ramifications of alcohol use and abuse. Yes, alcohol. According to NORML, which some will dispute, such agencies as the National Academy of Sciences, the Connecticut Law Review Commission and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan all found that decriminalization causes no substantial increase either in marijuana use or the use of other substances, including alcohol. The British, Dutch and Australians concluded much the same.

This begs the question of what effect the entire so-called Drug War industry is having on public policy and therefore public opinion.

It should be noted that five Mayo physicians issued one warning just a couple of weeks ago that “An increasingly available option for medical patients suffering chronic pain -- medical marijuana -- should be avoided by teens.” However, it also states that their commentary  – “…to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings – relies on findings from cases involving three high school-age patients at Mayo's pediatric chronic pain clinic, who said they used marijuana regularly.” Note that this data comes from the experience of three teen patients.

It would take several pages (hours) to quote studies done in the US and Europe that refute the claims of those who denounce even the use of small amounts as “reefer madness” setting in, corrupting our children and inviting rapid addiction to the worst of the controlled substances, such as heroin and cocaine.

We thought it worthwhile to come back to this subject after last Fall’s election and this last Minnesota Legislative session’s introduction of measures to legalize medical marijuana, and this time to bring one of the suffering witnesses from that session’s testimony to talk to us about his experience as well.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI quiz the patient, the state senator and some other advocates and observers over the momentum behind medical marijuana as well as the hopes for complete decriminalization in Minnesota.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR SCOTT DIBBLE (DFL-Mpls 61) – Author, Medical Marijuana Senate File 1641; Chair, Transportation and Public Safety Committee and Chair of Transportation and Public Safety Division of Finance. (Sen. Dibble also authored the Marriage for All bill.)

KURTIS HANNA –  Executive Director, MN NORML

 

 

 

KATIE RUCKE – Editorial Assistant and Staff Writer, Mint Press News – specializing in health, criminal justice, education, whistleblowers and watchdog investigations.

PATRICK McCLELLAN, Burnsville – Sufferer from mitochondrial myopathy, a rare, genetic muscular disorder that causes severe, painful spasms.

 


AND YOU!!! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell and CivicMedia/Minnesota traveled to the University of Minnesota at Duluth (UMD) to air/televise the 5th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums the night of June 12 in the auditorium of the Labovitz School of Business & Economics (LSBE) –this one on the impacts of copper/nickel mining enterprises on Northeastern Minnesota lives and natural resources just as a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed PolyMet sulfide mine will be released prior permitting by the MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Army Corps of Engineers.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, brought Community Connections to affected residents of neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the state’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated with Minnesota’s many Indian tribes over the ability to manage the resources of those lands for the benefit of all residents. At risk may well be the planet's entire supply of true wild rice–manoomin–as a sacred crop of Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Natives.

Community Partners signing on to help CMM and TTT produce this televised conversation among panelists and constituents immediately impacted if these new mines are permitted were the Master of Advocacy & Political Leadership (MAPL)Program at UMD; KUMD RadioWaterLegacyFriends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; and Friends of the Cloquet Valley State Forest with cooperation of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and some labor unions serving the area.  

 GUESTS:

Nancy Schuldt, Water Resource Policy Director for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Paula Maccabee, Policy Director for WaterLegacy


 

 

 Aaron Klemz, Policy and Communications Director for the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

 Tamara Jones, President of the Carlton County Central Labor Body and a Union Rep for the United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1189

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*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

 

TruthToTell, Monday, June 24-9AM: ENCORE: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS V: Deeper Issues of Sulfide Mining;

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 24, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

 

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

TruthToTell and CivicMedia/Minnesota traveled to the University of Minnesota at Duluth (UMD) to air/televise the 5th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums the night of June 12 in the auditorium of the Labovitz School of Business & Economics (LSBE) –this one on the impacts of copper/nickel mining enterprises on Northeastern Minnesota lives and natural resources just as a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed PolyMet sulfide mine will be released prior permitting by the MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Army Corps of Engineers.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, brought Community Connections to affected residents of neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the state’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated with Minnesota’s many Indian tribes over the ability to manage the resources of those lands for the benefit of all residents. At risk may well be the planet's entire supply of true wild rice–manoomin–as a sacred crop of Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Natives.

Community Partners signing on to help CMM and TTT produce this televised conversation among panelists and constituents immediately impacted if these new mines are permitted were the Master of Advocacy & Political Leadership (MAPL)Program at UMD; KUMD RadioWaterLegacyFriends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; and Friends of the Cloquet Valley State Forest with cooperation of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and some labor unions serving the area.  

 GUESTS:

Nancy Schuldt, Water Resource Policy Director for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Paula Maccabee, Policy Director for WaterLegacy


 

 

 Aaron Klemz, Policy and Communications Director for the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

 Tamara Jones, President of the Carlton County Central Labor Body and a Union Rep for the United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1189

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

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MOST RECENT SHOW

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Monday, June 17, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It could be rationally believed that, with the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) (read Obamacare)**, single-payeradvocates would pull in their horns on the strength of the coming 2014 implementation of that law that would seem to cover everyone (universal coverage) at some reasonable cost – see Health Insurance Exchanges –MNsure in Minnesota.

To that notion, Health Care for All-Minnesota (in league with Physicians for a National Health Plan Minnesota – PNHP) replies, “The federal reforms are a positive step that will provide coverage to many of the uninsured, but they do little to control the costs for those who already have insurance, and the skyrocketing cost of health care must be addressed. By delivering health care in an efficient, common sense manner, the MHP will make health care affordable to all.

MHP is the Minnesota Health Plan – an alternative to the ACA’s Health Insurance Exchanges and MNsure – is proposed as a system to cover everyone, leaving out no one and doing it all for less money, according to these proponents.

A few months ago, TTT’s Community Connections series brought you a one-hour special broadcast live from the Wilder Foundation and featured advocates and arguments in favor of Minnesota’s legislation to create its own version of a federally mandated health insurance exchange – an option for states to establish (some have, some refuse to, meaning the feds will step in and run one) a system allowing those without employer-supplied insurance or medical assistance to purchase some sort of plan. PNHP appeared in support of that plan, but stressed that the real answer for universal coverage at a minimal or no cost to patients while lowering the “skyrocketing” costs of healthcare, period.

And, so the push by supporters of single-payer – a system of mandated coverage paid for by your tax dollars with services provided by the same private providers (clinics and hospitals and professionals) now providing your care – maintain their belief and their campaign – and we’ll ask why all this is necessary under the circumstances.

And we’ll hear cuttings of a powerful one-man play – “Mercy Killers” – live from our studios with that show’s writer and performer, Michael Milligan, here to perform his entire play at HCA-MN and PNHP-MN’s Annual Summer Celebration, this year from the stage of Chanhassen Dinner Theatre this coming Thursday, June 20th. (A few seats are left for only the performance at this writing, so check here for ticket availability.)

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring you a discussion with the proponents of single-payer and an introduction to “Mercy Killers”.

** The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed by Congress and signed into law by the President in March 2010. On June 28, 2012, the Supreme Court rendered a final decision to uphold the health care law.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR JOHN MARTY (DFL-66) – Member, Health, Human Services and HousingCommittee (Also: Chair, Environment and Energy Committee).

 

ERIN ANDERSON – Executive Director, Health Care for All-Minnesota

 

 

 


MICHAEL MILLIGAN – Creator, Performer, “Mercy Killers.


AND YOU!! CALL US at 612-341-0980 or post a comment at TruthToTell's Facebook Page

 

 

TruthToTell, Monday, June 17−9AM: "MERCY KILLERS": More Need than Ever for Single-Payer?; TruthToTell, June 10: BURNING GARBAGE: HERC Permits Still Firing Disputes - Audio HERE & Video Link Coming

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 17, 2013

CALL and Join This Conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


It could be rationally believed that, with the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) (read Obamacare)**, single-payer advocates would pull in their horns on the strength of the coming 2014 implementation of that law that would seem to cover everyone (universal coverage) at some reasonable cost – see Health Insurance Exchanges –MNsure in Minnesota.

To that notion, Health Care for All-Minnesota (in league with Physicians for a National Health Plan Minnesota – PNHP) replies, “The federal reforms are a positive step that will provide coverage to many of the uninsured, but they do little to control the costs for those who already have insurance, and the skyrocketing cost of health care must be addressed. By delivering health care in an efficient, common sense manner, the MHP will make health care affordable to all.

MHP is the Minnesota Health Plan – an alternative to the ACA’s Health Insurance Exchanges and MNsure – is proposed as a system to cover everyone, leaving out no one and doing it all for less money, according to these proponents.

A few months ago, TTT’s Community Connections series brought you a one-hour special broadcast live from the Wilder Foundation and featured advocates and arguments in favor of Minnesota’s legislation to create its own version of a federally mandated health insurance exchange – an option for states to establish (some have, some refuse to, meaning the feds will step in and run one) a system allowing those without employer-supplied insurance or medical assistance to purchase some sort of plan. PNHP appeared in support of that plan, but stressed that the real answer for universal coverage at a minimal or no cost to patients while lowering the “skyrocketing” costs of healthcare, period.

And, so the push by supporters of single-payer – a system of mandated coverage paid for by your tax dollars with services provided by the same private providers (clinics and hospitals and professionals) now providing your care – maintain their belief and their campaign – and we’ll ask why all this is necessary under the circumstances.

And we’ll hear cuttings of a powerful one-man play – “Mercy Killers” – live from our studios with that show’s writer and performer, Michael Milligan, here to perform his entire play at HCA-MN and PNHP-MN’s Annual Summer Celebration, this year from the stage of Chanhassen Dinner Theatre this coming Thursday, June 20th. (A few seats are left for only the performance at this writing, so check here for ticket availability.)

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring you a discussion with the proponents of single-payer and an introduction to “Mercy Killers”.

** The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed by Congress and signed into law by the President in March 2010. On June 28, 2012, the Supreme Court rendered a final decision to uphold the health care law.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR JOHN MARTY (DFL-66) – Member, Health, Human Services and HousingCommittee (Also: Chair, Environment and Energy Committee).

 

ERIN ANDERSON – Executive Director, Health Care for All-Minnesota

 

 

 


MICHAEL MILLIGAN – Creator, Performer, “Mercy Killers.


AND YOU!! CALL US at 612-341-0980 or post a comment at TruthToTell's Facebook Page

 

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, June 10, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the climate heats up once again around the wisdom of allowing the Hennepin County Energy Recovery Center (HERC) – or as it’s colloquially known – the downtown Minneapolis garbage burner – to up its garbage-burning capacity by 20% over its currently permitted limit, the advocates from every corner – the State Legislature, the MPCA, Hennepin County, Covanta Energy (contractor-operator of the garbage burning generator), Minneapolis, and several citizen commissions and advocates are active again in staking out recalcitrant positions for and against both the facility itself – and its application for increased burning. The heat comes from sometimes totally unrelated arguments regarding the same project:

Is Hennepin County’s and Covanta’s Waste to Energy (WTE) facility – the HERC – better at reducing the city’s and county’s wastes by not dumping them in landfills the way we as a society have done for centuries? Probably. The United States remains one of the very few industrial nations which still landfills nearly 70% of its waste while some European nations actually reuse and recycle up to70% of theirs, some of them almost down to zero landfilling.

But the questions don’t stop there. Just what are they burning in those furnaces and what by-products of that burning are adversely affecting human health? And, after the burning, what’s left in the ash and where should the ash go? If any or all of these things are as toxic as the burning facility’s critics say they are (and they must be, since it requires a Pollution Control Agency permit to even run the place). We know that deadly mercury, lead, cadmium, hydrochloric acid, Nitrogen Oxides – or NOx – carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and a couple of other pollutants are emitted in some quantity down there.

Some friends of the HERC insist that the WTE facility has reduced those toxic emissions by massive percentages and that the waste would be dumped in landfills if not burned. It’s opponents absolutely insist this is not so, while also saying that any burning of anything whatsoever is far too detrimental to the public health and adding exponentially to the greenhouse gases (GHG) responsible for climate change.

This is hardly a partisan issue since supporters of both the HERC and its opponents reside in all the parties and across the political spectrum.

Helping to feed the latest controversy was a MinnPost Community Voices columnsubmitted by well-known Minnesota science writer, filmmaker, and novelist, Shawn Lawrence Otto, who bio states that he “lives in a wind-powered, passive solar, superinsulated geothermal home he designed and built with his own hands. He recycles, composts and drives a hybrid car.” In his piece, he plumps for TWE as at least the current answer to landfilling garbage.

As for the process of approvals and appeals submitted to the umpteen agencies in charge:Hennepin County, the City of Minneapolis Planning Commission and City Council, The MN Pollution Control Agency (MPCA-permitting authority)Lara Norkus-Crampton, a nurse who has sat on the Planning Commission continually reminds whoever will listen that

“In the last four years that this Appeal has been dragging out, we have observed the County wanting to talk about anything besides the required findings this proposal couldn't meet to get the Conditional Use Permit to burn 20% more garbage per day at HERC. The issue before us is whether or not a HERC Conditional Use Permit should be allowed to be granted to burn approx 400,000 pounds more garbage per day. The required findings they were judged unable to meet by the Mpls Planning Commission are: 1) Will not endanger or be a detriment to the public health, safety, comfort or general welfare; and 2) Will not be injurious to the use and enjoyment of other property in the vicinity, and will not impede the normal or orderly development and improvement of surrounding property for uses permitted in the district.

“The County and Covanta appealed our denial but in four years have still have not presented the data to prove that this proposal won't impact the health of people living downwind or negatively impact the property rights of those unlucky enough to be getting regular showers of toxic emissions.”

State Rep. Frank Hornstein and Ms. Norkus-Crampton and other opponents will face off a bit with passionate supporter of the increased capacity, Hennepin County Commissioner Peter McLaughlin, as TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query some of the key players in this four-year drama of application, appeal, revisions and more appeals and, ultimately to answer the questions we should all be asking: what is the safest alternative to the HERC facility and should it be allowed to burn even more than currently allowed. And what roles do all the elected and appointed officials in each jurisdiction play in all this?

GUESTS:

STATE REPRESENTATIVE FRANK HORNSTEIN (DFL-61A) Mpls – Member of the House Energy Policy and Ways&Means Committees

COMMISSIONER PETER MCLAUGHLIN – Hennepin County Board of Commissioners - Chair, Public Works, Energy & Environment Committee; Member, Solid Waste Management Coordinating Board

 


LARA NORKUS-CRAMPTON, RN – Former Member, Minneapolis Planning Commission; Community and Environmental activist; Presented with Minnesota Nurses Association 2012 Bettye Shogren Health and Safety Award.

ALAN MULLER – International Environmental Watchdog; Founder, Green Delaware; Active opponent of HERC – and all burning.


 

TruthToTell, Monday, June 10-9AM: BURNING GARBAGE: HERC Permits Still Firing Disputes; TruthToTell, June 3: TONY BOUZA: The "Expert Witness"

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 10, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the climate heats up once again around the wisdom of allowing the Hennepin County Energy Recovery Center (HERC) – or as it’s colloquially known – the downtown Minneapolis garbage burner – to up its garbage-burning capacity by 20% over its currently permitted limit, the advocates from every corner – the State Legislature, the MPCA, Hennepin County, Covanta Energy (contractor-operator of the garbage burning generator), Minneapolis, and several citizen commissions and advocates are active again in staking out recalcitrant positions for and against both the facility itself – and its application for increased burning. The heat comes from sometimes totally unrelated arguments regarding the same project:

Is Hennepin County’s and Covanta’s Waste to Energy (WTE) facility – the HERC – better at reducing the city’s and county’s wastes by not dumping them in landfills the way we as a society have done for centuries? Probably. The United States remains one of the very few industrial nations which still landfills nearly 70% of its waste while some European nations actually reuse and recycle up to70% of theirs, some of them almost down to zero landfilling.

But the questions don’t stop there. Just what are they burning in those furnaces and what by-products of that burning are adversely affecting human health? And, after the burning, what’s left in the ash and where should the ash go? If any or all of these things are as toxic as the burning facility’s critics say they are (and they must be, since it requires a Pollution Control Agency permit to even run the place). We know that deadly mercury, lead, cadmium, hydrochloric acid, Nitrogen Oxides – or NOx – carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and a couple of other pollutants are emitted in some quantity down there.

Some friends of the HERC insist that the WTE facility has reduced those toxic emissions by massive percentages and that the waste would be dumped in landfills if not burned. It’s opponents absolutely insist this is not so, while also saying that any burning of anything whatsoever is far too detrimental to the public health and adding exponentially to the greenhouse gases (GHG) responsible for climate change.

This is hardly a partisan issue since supporters of both the HERC and its opponents reside in all the parties and across the political spectrum.

Helping to feed the latest controversy was a MinnPost Community Voices columnsubmitted by well-known Minnesota science writer, filmmaker, and novelist, Shawn Lawrence Otto, who bio states that he “lives in a wind-powered, passive solar, superinsulated geothermal home he designed and built with his own hands. He recycles, composts and drives a hybrid car.” In his piece, he plumps for TWE as at least the current answer to landfilling garbage.

As for the process of approvals and appeals submitted to the umpteen agencies in charge:Hennepin County, the City of Minneapolis Planning Commission and City Council, The MN Pollution Control Agency (MPCA-permitting authority)Lara Norkus-Crampton, a nurse who has sat on the Planning Commission continually reminds whoever will listen that

“In the last four years that this Appeal has been dragging out, we have observed the County wanting to talk about anything besides the required findings this proposal couldn't meet to get the Conditional Use Permit to burn 20% more garbage per day at HERC. The issue before us is whether or not a HERC Conditional Use Permit should be allowed to be granted to burn approx 400,000 pounds more garbage per day. The required findings they were judged unable to meet by the Mpls Planning Commission are: 1) Will not endanger or be a detriment to the public health, safety, comfort or general welfare; and 2) Will not be injurious to the use and enjoyment of other property in the vicinity, and will not impede the normal or orderly development and improvement of surrounding property for uses permitted in the district.

“The County and Covanta appealed our denial but in four years have still have not presented the data to prove that this proposal won't impact the health of people living downwind or negatively impact the property rights of those unlucky enough to be getting regular showers of toxic emissions.”

State Rep. Frank Hornstein and Ms. Norkus-Crampton and other opponents will face off a bit with passionate supporter of the increased capacity, Hennepin County Commissioner Peter McLaughlin, as TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query some of the key players in this four-year drama of application, appeal, revisions and more appeals and, ultimately to answer the questions we should all be asking: what is the safest alternative to the HERC facility and should it be allowed to burn even more than currently allowed. And what roles do all the elected and appointed officials in each jurisdiction play in all this?

GUESTS:

STATE REPRESENTATIVE FRANK HORNSTEIN (DFL-61A) Mpls – Member of the House Energy Policy and Ways&Means Committees

COMMISSIONER PETER MCLAUGHLIN – Hennepin County Board of Commissioners - Chair, Public Works, Energy & Environment Committee; Member, Solid Waste Management Coordinating Board

 


LARA NORKUS-CRAMPTON, RN – Former Member, Minneapolis Planning Commission; Community and Environmental activist; Presented with Minnesota Nurses Association 2012 Bettye Shogren Health and Safety Award.

ALAN MULLER – International Environmental Watchdog; Founder, Green Delaware; Active opponent of HERC – and all burning.

 


JUSTIN EIBENHOLZL – Former Southeast Como Environmental Director; Founder, Como Green Village; Co-founder, Southeast Como Solar Pilot Project & the former MIMO (Move In/Move Out Waste Reduction Program); Co-founder, Clean Energy Now! (Coal-fired plant mitigation)

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, June 3, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The guy can drive you nuts. Just when you think he’s about to encase himself in a predictable cloak of political or public safety polarization, out he comes with sometimes shocking contradiction. This is Tony Bouza and his oft-quoted remark: 

“I am an unapologetic supporter of the use of police violence, even lethal force, but it has to be guided by the law, the standards of reasonableness and the U.S. Constitution. I have presided over clubbings, shootings, gassings, and other assaults by the police. I see violence as a key weapon in the police arsenal and trained cops in the full range of possibilities available to us.

"My only caveat is that the use of force has to be legally justified, measured, and appropriate, and that the weapons have to be in conformance with the law."

This is part of the Preface of Tony Bouza’s latest book, Expert Witness: Breaking the Policemen’s Blue Code of Silence, a volume of case files in which the former Minneapolis police chief, considered by most to be a maverick cop, remains a conscientious defender of ethics in policing – this, despite the statement above.

Those on the receiving end of police violence – especially serious advocates of reining in all police abuse – might dispute even this reasoning on its use in enforcing the law. And yet:

This is also the guy writing books and running around the country testifying against police abuse, abuse too often forgiven by chiefs, prosecutors, judges and juries, more often than not pitting the word of men (and some women) of color against cops known to their colleagues and other witnesses as “thumpers” or worse – killers – many willing to lie on reports and cover for each other, no matter how straight most of them may be – because the Blue Code of Silence is like the Mafia’s Black Hand: you never, but never fink on a fellow cop.

Multiply Rodney King times a million or more victims of out-of-control street muggings by uniformed police officers, unafraid of rolling cameras and cell phone videos, knowing the chances are somewhere in the neighborhood of 90% that the cops will get off, despite the visual evidence. Pictures don’t matter much when the public is scared to death – either of criminals or cops – and refuse to convict. The rare conviction usually means one’s network has failed him (or her – almost never her).

Tony Bouza’s years as a cop and his rebellious nature as chief lend him a certain cache of credibility as an expert witness in criminal and civil cases calling out his former brothers in blue for their arrogant excesses, similar to a few other ex-police officers, like author and retired Minneapolis supervisor, Mike Quinn. Quinn’s book, Walking with the Devil: The Police Code of Silence, like Bouza’s, depicts cops as dedicated law enforcement officers – until they lose it – and they lose it often, especially those in Minneapolis Police uniforms. But the criticism remains and some very broken heads and dead bodies have resulted in the name of “protecting and serving.”

As MPR reporter Dan Olson suggested in his 2004 interview of Quinn: “If observing the code protects police, protects citizens and puts bad people away, isn't it at worst, harmless and at best, beneficial?” Quinn says no. He says the code changes the police motto "protect and serve" to "convict and incarcerate." It encourages police to take the law into their own hands, because they know there's little chance their wrongdoing will be exposed by other officers.

‘Then we start having problems," Quinn says, "because then we start seeing that it's OK to start kicking in doors without warrants, that it's OK to make that drug arrest without really seeing them drop the drugs.’”

But that may only be the half of it. The very notion of such codes bespeaks a corrupting culture that may give a false sense of security to those who stay away from criminality or even legal dissent, but get in the face of any officer, and you will find the most innocent of democratic values may mean nothing to the uniform in front of you, one accompanied by a very large gun, a baton and a can of pepper spray.

TTT’s Andy Driscoll talks with a returning Tony Bouza, now author of some twelve books, about his latest, Expert Witness: Breaking the Policemen’s Blue Code of Silence.

Former Minneapolis Police Chief Tony Bouza

 

TruthToTell, Monday, June 3 - 9AM: TONY BOUZA: The "Expert Witness"; TruthToTell ENORE: Monday, May 27 - 9AM: DAVID NOBLE SPEAKS: The End of History-Is It Debatable?

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 3, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The guy can drive you nuts. Just when you think he’s about to encase himself in a predictable cloak of political or public safety polarization, out he comes with sometimes shocking contradiction. This is Tony Bouza and his oft-quoted remark: 

“I am an unapologetic supporter of the use of police violence, even lethal force, but it has to be guided by the law, the standards of reasonableness and the U.S. Constitution. I have presided over clubbings, shootings, gassings, and other assaults by the police. I see violence as a key weapon in the police arsenal and trained cops in the full range of possibilities available to us.

"My only caveat is that the use of force has to be legally justified, measured, and appropriate, and that the weapons have to be in conformance with the law."

This is part of the Preface of Tony Bouza’s latest book, Expert Witness: Breaking the Policemen’s Blue Code of Silence, a volume of case files in which the former Minneapolis police chief, considered by most to be a maverick cop, remains a conscientious defender of ethics in policing – this, despite the statement above.

Those on the receiving end of police violence – especially serious advocates of reining in all police abuse – might dispute even this reasoning on its use in enforcing the law. And yet:

This is also the guy writing books and running around the country testifying against police abuse, abuse too often forgiven by chiefs, prosecutors, judges and juries, more often than not pitting the word of men (and some women) of color against cops known to their colleagues and other witnesses as “thumpers” or worse – killers – many willing to lie on reports and cover for each other, no matter how straight most of them may be – because the Blue Code of Silence is like the Mafia’s Black Hand: you never, but never fink on a fellow cop.

Multiply Rodney King times a million or more victims of out-of-control street muggings by uniformed police officers, unafraid of rolling cameras and cell phone videos, knowing the chances are somewhere in the neighborhood of 90% that the cops will get off, despite the visual evidence. Pictures don’t matter much when the public is scared to death – either of criminals or cops – and refuse to convict. The rare conviction usually means one’s network has failed him (or her – almost never her).

Tony Bouza’s years as a cop and his rebellious nature as chief lend him a certain cache of credibility as an expert witness in criminal and civil cases calling out his former brothers in blue for their arrogant excesses, similar to a few other ex-police officers, like author and retired Minneapolis supervisor, Mike Quinn. Quinn’s book, Walking with the Devil: The Police Code of Silence, like Bouza’s, depicts cops as dedicated law enforcement officers – until they lose it – and they lose it often, especially those in Minneapolis Police uniforms. But the criticism remains and some very broken heads and dead bodies have resulted in the name of “protecting and serving.”

As MPR reporter Dan Olson suggested in his 2004 interview of Quinn: “If observing the code protects police, protects citizens and puts bad people away, isn't it at worst, harmless and at best, beneficial?” Quinn says no. He says the code changes the police motto "protect and serve" to "convict and incarcerate." It encourages police to take the law into their own hands, because they know there's little chance their wrongdoing will be exposed by other officers.

‘Then we start having problems," Quinn says, "because then we start seeing that it's OK to start kicking in doors without warrants, that it's OK to make that drug arrest without really seeing them drop the drugs.’”

But that may only be the half of it. The very notion of such codes bespeaks a corrupting culture that may give a false sense of security to those who stay away from criminality or even legal dissent, but get in the face of any officer, and you will find the most innocent of democratic values may mean nothing to the uniform in front of you, one accompanied by a very large gun, a baton and a can of pepper spray.

TTT’s Andy Driscoll talks with a returning Tony Bouza, now author of some twelve books, about his latest, Expert Witness: Breaking the Policemen’s Blue Code of Silence.

Former Minneapolis Police Chief Tony Bouza

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, May 27, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It seems appropriate on this Memorial Day (started by former slaves and Civil War veterans) to revisit our conversation with American History Professor Emeritus, David Noble.

Some questions posed by Historian and American Studies pioneer, David Noble, might have some of us scratching our heads – for a minute.

“Why do modern people believe that there will be perpetual economic growth?”

Let’s stop right there and give some thought to this question. By modern people, David Noble is not zeroing in on living Americans; he sees modernity as dating back to the Greeks when men the likes of Plato began an era, nay, millennia, of thinking that instead of caving into the reality of our limits, or of the cycles of life, or what he calls a timeful culture, there began the hubris of timelessness inherent in mankind’s perceived ability to control nature, interrupting its built-in cycles of life and death and disease, and extending life, perhaps forever someday, by conquering death.

Such beliefs formed the core, the nucleus of modern humans trying to throw off traditional cultures and insisting that nothing can – or should – stand in the way of human “progress” and ever-expanding capitalism that presumes that economic and natural Utopia lies just around that next corner only to see how the natural limits have created rising poverty, racism, economic turmoil and an instability in culture and nature we never thought possible.

It also, says David, presumes that the Earth is not the living organism it most certainly is, and that we may be the only species will to deny it in order to conquer it, to extract all of its natural resources and convert to cash all that we can of the clean air and water we once inherited as members of that most stable, self-correcting world in which, thanks to the cycles of life and death and other natural phenomena, we’ve seen evolution and revolution.

The latest in David’s long series of treatises on the Two World theory – the old, timeful world vs. the new, timeless one we keep trying to create again and again to no avail – is titledDebating the End of History: The Marketplace, Utopia, and the Fragmentation of Intellectual Life (Critical American Studies). Just about all of David’s titles sound apocryphal - Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism (Critical American Studies) and End Of American History: Democracy, Capitalism, and the Metaphor of Two Worlds in Anglo-American Historical Writing, 1880-1980Historians Against History and The End of History (University of Minnesota Press, 1965-2012), and some essays of similar bent. The reason, one can be assured, is that the man has never stopped exploring that theory since his conversion from it to a new view through his readings of how fiction and nonfiction writers view such worlds, and discovering that fiction-writers (Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner and others) allow the real world to have its way with us. A major discovery. That history as we perceive it is dead because it denies important realities.

This is how David taught his American History and American Studies classes – but with a wry smile and a jaundiced eye on the “American Way” even as he explored The Progressive Era from his Master’s Thesis on down to the present. David taught in costume. He taught lying on his back (simply because he couldn’t stand up from a bad back). He brought history and ideas to life and he force everyone to think – which is how the American Studies Department came into being in the first place. Now, at 87, with a household of family members resembling an agrarian settlement around him, the man still teaches, though retired officially, still studies others’ theories he maintains only reinforces his critiques of modern humanity.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL visits once again with his former American History instructor to talk about where western “civilization” may have gone off the rails and why we must the natural limits to growth we as the New World culture of capitalism absolutely believe is essential to its success.

GUEST:

DAVID W. NOBLE – Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota Department of American Studies; Author, Debating the End of History and nearly a dozen other books calling out the Two Worlds Theory

 

TruthToTell ENCORE: Monday, May 27 - 9AM: DAVID NOBLE SPEAKS: The End of History-Is It Debatable?; May 20 AUDIO: PERSONAL CAREGIVERS: Unheralded, Underpaid, Unrepresented

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Monday, May 27, 2013

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It seems appropriate on this Memorial Day (started by former slaves and Civil War veterans) to revisit our conversation with American History Professor Emeritus, David Noble.

Some questions posed by Historian and American Studies pioneer, David Noble, might have some of us scratching our heads – for a minute.

“Why do modern people believe that there will be perpetual economic growth?”

Let’s stop right there and give some thought to this question. By modern people, David Noble is not zeroing in on living Americans; he sees modernity as dating back to the Greeks when men the likes of Plato began an era, nay, millennia, of thinking that instead of caving into the reality of our limits, or of the cycles of life, or what he calls a timeful culture, there began the hubris of timelessness inherent in mankind’s perceived ability to control nature, interrupting its built-in cycles of life and death and disease, and extending life, perhaps forever someday, by conquering death.

Such beliefs formed the core, the nucleus of modern humans trying to throw off traditional cultures and insisting that nothing can – or should – stand in the way of human “progress” and ever-expanding capitalism that presumes that economic and natural Utopia lies just around that next corner only to see how the natural limits have created rising poverty, racism, economic turmoil and an instability in culture and nature we never thought possible.

It also, says David, presumes that the Earth is not the living organism it most certainly is, and that we may be the only species will to deny it in order to conquer it, to extract all of its natural resources and convert to cash all that we can of the clean air and water we once inherited as members of that most stable, self-correcting world in which, thanks to the cycles of life and death and other natural phenomena, we’ve seen evolution and revolution.

The latest in David’s long series of treatises on the Two World theory – the old, timeful world vs. the new, timeless one we keep trying to create again and again to no avail – is titled Debating the End of History: The Marketplace, Utopia, and the Fragmentation of Intellectual Life (Critical American Studies). Just about all of David’s titles sound apocryphal - Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism (Critical American Studies) and End Of American History: Democracy, Capitalism, and the Metaphor of Two Worlds in Anglo-American Historical Writing, 1880-1980Historians Against History and The End of History (University of Minnesota Press, 1965-2012), and some essays of similar bent. The reason, one can be assured, is that the man has never stopped exploring that theory since his conversion from it to a new view through his readings of how fiction and nonfiction writers view such worlds, and discovering that fiction-writers (Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner and others) allow the real world to have its way with us. A major discovery. That history as we perceive it is dead because it denies important realities.

This is how David taught his American History and American Studies classes – but with a wry smile and a jaundiced eye on the “American Way” even as he explored The Progressive Era from his Master’s Thesis on down to the present. David taught in costume. He taught lying on his back (simply because he couldn’t stand up from a bad back). He brought history and ideas to life and he force everyone to think – which is how the American Studies Department came into being in the first place. Now, at 87, with a household of family members resembling an agrarian settlement around him, the man still teaches, though retired officially, still studies others’ theories he maintains only reinforces his critiques of modern humanity.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL visits once again with his former American History instructor to talk about where western “civilization” may have gone off the rails and why we must the natural limits to growth we as the New World culture of capitalism absolutely believe is essential to its success.

GUEST:

DAVID W. NOBLE – Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota Department of American Studies; Author, Debating the End of History and nearly a dozen other books calling out the Two Worlds Theory

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Monday, May 20, 2013

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Somehow, most of the people we know who are caring for another person, no matter if the caregiver is a family member or a detached professional, we rarely hear about the extraordinary work and, yes, loving, that powers the work that keep homebound aging, sick and/or disabled relatives and clients as comfortable and occupied as humanly possible. Many are too embarrassed to talk about the human frailties that require such care, a sad commentary on society's intolerance for such things. Often, it’s our wives, mothers, fathers, siblings entering the last stages of life – stages that can stretch ten years or more and often marked by diminished capacity or mobility or both.

Some of our most prominent citizens can be found caring for family members or spelling professional caregivers. Since some of them are known publicly, I can mention them by name. For example, former Governor Al Quie, who must care for his beloved Gretchen with some respite, but very steadily day in, day out. That great lawyer of progressive causes, including Wounded Knee defendants and 1980s Powerlineprotestors, among dozens of others, Ken Tilsen, is himself struggling with severe loss of memory recording while his equally prominent spouse of some 12 years, Connie Goldman, the former arts correspondent for National Public Radio and a multi-book author on volumes about keeping aging people active, tries to care for him. Sometimes, family care is simply not possible; then come the high costs of skilled nursing facilities, for which many public funds are simply not available – including Medicare – which does NOT pay for “custodial” care – care that escorts all of us to our life’s end.

But, for all its nobility, personal and family caregiving is notoriously unheralded and badly underpaid. Even professionals suffer under the assumption that people who do such good works ought to just love the work right into the poor house. Professional caregivers struggle enough, but human services professionals responsible for compensating family members were, until a court order reversing them a short time ago, convinced that if you paid a living wage to a family caregiver, they’d rip off the state, and besides, it's a family member, after all. Why should they be paid to care for one of their own? Never mind the human and pocketbook costs that can devastate caregivers almost as much as their charges. Never mind the emotional and physical toll such continued concentrated care takes on – not the patient, but the caregiver.

State courts agreed unanimously with caregivers who challenged those state and county bureaucrats’ contention that family caregivers need or deserve that much less than the state is willing to cough up for professional aides, and that ain’t much, either.

Finally, this year, thanks to the efforts of both professionals and family personal care assistants, legislation is on the cusp of providing what the courts have already insisted must be done: adequate compensation and the ability to unionize. The Legislature finally passed the bill just before the session adjourned, barely, thanks to a raft of misinformation scaring the daylights out of independent daycare providers.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with personal care assistants and advocates and hear their stories while tracking the work of the legislature and those pressing for measures to empower and professionalize the entire field.

GUESTS:

CONNIE GOLDMAN – Author, former Arts Correspondent and Personal Caregiver

BRIDGET SILJANDER – Executive Director at The Youth Legacy Foundation; President and Chair at Direct Support Professional Assoc of MN and Self-Employed Home Health Aide

BOB HINES – President of Mature Voices; Personal Care Assistant to family member; former newscaster, KFAI

GALEN SMITH – Organizer SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, representing Direct Support Professionals

DARLEEN HENRY – Professional Personal Care Assistant