TTT newsletter archives

Here is an archive list of all published newsletter issues with the most recent issue listed first.

TruthToTell, Monday, May 20 - 9am: PERSONAL CAREGIVERS: Unheralded, Underpaid, Unrepresented; TruthToTell-May, 2013: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IV: MINNESOTA MIX: Immigration Issues

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, May 20, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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Somehow, most of the people we know who are caring for another person, no matter if this caregiver is a family member or a detached professional, we rarely hear about the extraordinary work and, yes, loving, that powers the work that keep homebound aging, sick and/or disabled relatives and clients as comfortable and occupied as humanly possible.

People just don’t talk about such responsibilities having been lain in the laps through one or more of the physical and mental circumstances human frailty creates. Often, it’s our wives, mothers, fathers, siblings entering the last stages of life – stages that can stretch ten years or more and often marked by diminished capacity or mobility or both.

Your writer can think of at least several dozen of his own extended family members who have nurtured loved ones right to the end, sometimes in hospice, often not even that, and especially those afflicted with memory loss or dementia, losing their love and companionship years before they physically leave this vale. Most, but not all of these friends and family, suffer in silence and even more often in a rapid descent into poverty if professional assistance or skilled nursing care is needed 24/7/365 for very many months or years.

In fact some of our most prominent citizens can be found caring or spelling professional caregivers. Since some of them are known publicly, I can mention them by name. For example, former Governor Al Quie, who must care for his beloved Gretchen with some respite, but very steadily day in, day out. That great lawyer of progressive causes, includingWounded Knee defendants and 1980s Powerline protestors, among dozens of others,Ken Tilsen, is himself struggling with severe loss of memory recording while his equally prominent spouse of some 12 years, Connie Goldman, the former arts correspondent forNational Public Radio and a multi-book author on volumes about keeping aging people active, tries to care for him. Sometimes, family care is simply not possible; then come the high costs of skilled nursing facilities, for which many public funds are simply not available – including Medicare – which does NOT pay for “custodial” care – care that escorts all of us to our life’s end.

But, for all its nobility, personal and family caregiving is notoriously unheralded and badly underpaid. Even professionals suffer under the assumption that people who do such good works ought to just love the work right into the poor house. Professional caregivers struggle enough, but human services professionals responsible for compensating family members were, until a court order reversing them a short time ago, convinced that if you paid a living wage to a family caregiver, they’d rip off the state, and besides, it's a family member, after all. Why should they be paid to care for one of their own? Never mind the human and pocketbook costs that can devastate caregivers almost as much as their charges. Never mind the emotional and physical toll such continued concentrated care takes on – not the patient, but the caregiver.

So, when sued, the state courts agreed unanimously with caregivers who challenged those state and county bureaucrats’ contention that family caregivers need or deserve that much less than the state is willing to cough up for professional aides, and that ain’t much, either.

Finally, this year, thanks to the efforts of both professionals and family personal care assistants, legislation is on the cusp of providing what the courts have already insisted must be done: adequate compensation and the ability to unionize. The Senate has passed thebill, authored by Sen. Sandy Pappas. The House will have had its floor debate Saturday.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with personal care assistants and advocates and hear their stories while tracking the work of the legislature and those pressing for measures to empower and professionalize the entire field.

GUESTS:

CONNIE GOLDMAN – Author, former Arts Correspondent and Personal Caregiver

BRIDGET SILJANDER – Executive Director at The Youth Legacy Foundation; President and Chair at Direct Support Professional Assoc of MN and Self-Employed Home Health Aide

BOB HINES – President of Mature Voices; Personal Care Assistant to family member; former newscaster, KFAI

INVITED: GALEN SMITH – Organizer SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, representing Direct Support Professionals

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Monday, May 13, 2013

TruthToTell-May, 2013: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IV: MINNESOTA MIX: Immigration Issues

 - AUDIO HERE

IMMIGRATION REFORM AND MINNESOTA IMMIGRANT POLICY

This is our 4th TruthToTell: Community Connections forum – this time on the issues facing Minnesota's new immigrant communities and pending policy reform – held Wednesday evening, May 8 in the Grand Hall of the Center for Business and Technology at  North Hennepin Community College (MAP).

This forum was presented by CivicMedia-Minnesota in partnership with St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) through generous support from the Bush Foundation. Production partners for this episode were the Immigrant Law Center of MinnesotaACER (African Career Education Resource, Inc.) North Hennepin Community CollegeHennepin Technical College and SEIU Local 26 (Service Employees International Union).

* WATCH the video version of this show Monday, May 13 (THIS IS A CORRECTED DATE), from 8:00-9:00PM on St. Paul Cable Channel 19 and/or Minneapolis cable Channel 16. *

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI welcome our panelists and a live audience to talk Immigration issues.

Panelists/Guests:

JOHN KELLER – Executive Director of the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota

JOSEFINA CATALAN – of Mesa Latina/Mujeres en Liderazgo; Host, La Voz del Pueblo, KFAI, Sunday mornings

SIA HER – Executive Director of MN Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans

HASHI SHAFI – Executive Director of Somali Action Alliance

INVITED: Liberian representatives

Other prominent figure with us as well:

  • Waite House Executive Francisco Segovia
 

TruthToTell, Mon. May 13-9AM: TTT:COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IV: MINNESOTA MIX: Immigration Issues-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

TruthToTell, Weds, May 8 - Mon, May 13-9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IV: MINNESOTA MIX: Immigration Issues-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org (Audio Below)

 
On-air date: 

  Mon, 05/13/2013

Listen to or download this episode here: 

IMMIGRATION REFORM AND MINNESOTA IMMIGRANT POLICY

This is our 4th TruthToTell: Community Connections forum – this time on the issues facing Minnesota's new immigrant communities and pending policy reform – held Wednesday evening, May 8 in the Grand Hall of the Center for Business and Technology at  North Hennepin Community College (MAP).

This forum was presented by CivicMedia-Minnesota in partnership with St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) through generous support from the Bush Foundation. Production partners for this episode were the Immigrant Law Center of MinnesotaACER (African Career Education Resource, Inc.) North Hennepin Community CollegeHennepin Technical College and SEIU Local 26 (Service Employees International Union).

* WATCH the video version of this show Monday, May 12, from 8:00-9:00PM on St. Paul Cable Channel 19 and/or Minneapolis cable Channel 16. *

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI welcome our panelists and a live audience to talk Immigration issues.

On-air guests: 

JOHN KELLER – Executive Director of the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota

JOSEFINA CATALAN – of Mesa Latina/Mujeres en Liderazgo; Host, La Voz del Pueblo, KFAI, Sunday mornings

SIA HER – Executive Director of MN Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans

HASHI SHAFI – Executive Director of Somali Action Alliance

SPECIAL: TruthToTell, Weds, May 8 - 6:30pm/Mon, May 12-9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IV: MINNESOTA MIX: Immigration Issues

IMMIGRATION REFORM AND MINNESOTA IMMIGRANT POLICY

You are invited to be a part of our live, participatory studio audience when CivicMedia-Minnesotawill hold its fourth TruthToTell: Community Connections forum – this time on the issues facing Minnesota's new immigrant communities and pending policy reform – starting at 6:00PM Wednesday evening, May 8 in the Grand Hall of the Center for Business and Technology at  North Hennepin Community College (MAPat 7411 85th Avenue North in Brooklyn Park. (The State Senate passed the MN Dream Act May 1st!)

This forum is brought to you by CivicMedia-Minnesota in partnership with St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) through generous support from the Bush Foundation. Production partners for this episode were the Immigrant Law Center of MinnesotaACER (African Career Education Resource, Inc.) North Hennepin Community CollegeHennepin Technical College and SEIU Local 26 (Service Employees International Union).

* Watch this show Monday, May 12, from 8:00-9:00PM on St. Paul Cable Channel 19 and/or Minneapolis cable Channel 16 and/or hear us on TruthToTell Monday morning at 9:00AM. *

Light refreshments will be served.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI welcome our panelists and a live audience to talk Immigration issues.

Panelists/Guests:

JOHN KELLER – Executive Director of the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota

JOVITA FRANCISCO MORALES – of Mesa Latina

SIA HER – Executive Director of MN Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans

HASHI SHAFI – Executive Director of Somali Action Alliance

INVITED: Liberian representatives

Other prominent figures will be with us as well:

  • KFAI's Josefina Catalan
  • Waite House Executive Francisco Segovia
  • SEIU Local President Javier Morillo-Alicea
  • ACER President and Brooklyn Park activist Wynfred Russell
  • Others in the policy-making arena and students from local campuses.

TruthToTell, Monday, May 6 - 9am: LIFE COACHING: What Role in Behavior? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7, KFAI.org

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, May 6, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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Most of us can be forgiven if we come away from the word, “coaching” with some confusion or, at the very least, some predefined meaning of the term. Such is the what might be termed the laziness of the English language in that a single word can have so many applications that understanding any one or more of them often requires research and study.

Not a one of us misunderstands the term as it applies to sports. Coaching a sport is a revered position in any of those physical pursuits and very direct in terms of its hierarchical authority.

This hierarchy seems to disappear into a more nebulous realm – and controversy – when linked to the profession of so-called life coaching. Guidance seems a better word to describe this application of the term.

Here’s how the term appears in Wikipedia:

“Life coaching is a practice that helps people identify and achieve personal goals. Life coaches assist clients by using a variety of tools and techniques. Life coaching draws inspiration from disciplines such as sociology, psychology, positive adult development and career counseling. Specialty life coaches may have degrees in psychological counseling, hypnosis, dream analysis, marketing and other areas relevant to providing guidance. However, they are not necessarily therapists or consultants; psychological intervention and business analysis may be outside the scope of some coaches' work.”

The idea is relatively new, originating, it appears, in fact, in the sports arena in the late 1970’s/early 80s. That may be one of the reasons some distrust its purpose and motivation, not to mention its possible impingement on other counseling professions, including psychotherapy. Some states have risen to the challenge that this life coaching is a generally unregulated industry of mind-workers presents and have attempted to address its overall position in the mental health field as a behavioral practice even as other of the behavioral health professions – psychiatry, psychology, psychotherapy and other counseling pursuits – are regulated to a fare-thee-well. Certificates credentialing life coaches are supplied those who see this as a both a needed and possibly lucrative addition to the behavioral field. The degree to which those certificates are recognized as qualifying documents for what is essentially a counseling practice may depend entirely on the schools and jurisdictions involved.

Coaching itself is a Topsy-like pursuit. A sample of the specialty areas where varying techniques apply include: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); business coaching, especially as a human resource development tool; the self-explanatory executive coaching arena; career, financial, personal, conflict and health coaching. Mentioned in the list are the interesting specialties, victimization and dating – even “Christian” – coaching.

All of this to say that this rapidly burgeoning and increasingly popular field is touching huge numbers of people, companies, and specific constituencies. What do the practitioners have to say about all this? We’ll ask them.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with three of the many coaches who have zeroed in on what seems like a growing demand for a more collaborative form of self-realization and improvement without a prescription, per se.

GUESTS:

PAULA HEMMING, MA, PCC – Principal, Relationship Champions

DAVE WONDRA, PCC – ICF Professional Certified Coach; Founder, WondraGroup

ELIZABETH DICKINSON, B.Ed., M.A, CLC, MACP – Adler-certified coach

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Monday, April 29, 2013

Many will tout these days, particularly since the election of President Obama, that racism is no longer an issue in the country. But as we've seen how the disparate rates of black male prisoners in this country have created slavery by another name, we must also see how certain daily privileges afforded to the majority groups in power in the United States, media portrayals, and the like, are, in fact, racism by another name.   

The fact is, even if we have succeeded in quashing the completely irrational fears that led to the formation of hate groups such as the Klu Klux Klan and other groups that sought to torture or kill people based on race, we are still dealing with the socio-economic aftermath of what that way of thinking has done to this country and its diverse body of citizens.

Right here in Minnesota, a recent study from the Wilder Foundation found that 37 percent of people in Dakota, Washington, and Ramsey counties still say they get nervous walking into a room of people from other races, if they are the only one of their own race present. One third of these same folks say they strongly or somewhat agree that they would like to get to know people of other races better, but often feel as if they might be ridiculed or shamed if they say the wrong thing. Combine that with the disheartening statistics on education and housing disparities by race in this state and it’s hard to deny that racism is still an issue that needs much attention.  

Who will step up to help bridge the cultural and institutional divide that racial tensions have spawned? How exactly do you confront racism in a way that is both implicating and welcoming? These are all goals of the Facing Race ‘We’re all in this together’ Initiative. Hosts, Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O'Connell will discuss these issues of racism that are subtly embedded in our societal structure today as we talk about their upcoming Facing Race Ambassador Awards ceremony, happening the evening after our broadcast, and what these folks are doing to shed light on the privileges and the fears that continue to perpetuate racism in this country.  

TTT’s MICHELLE ALIMORADI and TOM O’CONNELL talk with key figures in this year’s Awards event. 

On-air guests: 

JOSIE JOHNSON- former University of Minnesota Regent; retired University of Minnesota Associate Vice President for Minority Student Affairs; Founder, UofM Office of Diversity & Equity, and Honoree - Josie R. Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award; Principal, Josie Robinson Johnson & Associates Consulting, and recipient of a 2013 Facing Race Amabassador Award.

 

 

CORINTH MATERA- Teacher, South High School, Minneapolis. Corinth was nominated for a Facing Race Ambassador Award for her work in creating an education unit addressing the U.S. Dakota War of 1862.  Ms. Matera has been a leader in promoting this education unit, and it has reached over 600 students in the past three years.

 

DR MANUEL PASTOR- Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Southern California; His most recent book, published in 2010,  is Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future. Keynote speaker at this year’s Facing Race Awards Ceremony. 


 

Monday, April 29-9AM: FACING RACE: Getting the Conversation Started; April 15: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS III: Re-entry Issues for Ex-Offenders

Many will tout these days, particularly since the election of President Obama, that racism is no longer an issue in the country. But as we've seen how the disparate rates of black male prisoners in this country have created slavery by another name, we must also see how certain daily privileges afforded to the majority groups in power in the United States, media portrayals, and the like, are, in fact, racism by another name.   

The fact is, even if we have succeeded in quashing the completely irrational fears that led to the formation of hate groups such as the Klu Klux Klan and other groups that sought to torture or kill people based on race, we are still dealing with the socio-economic aftermath of what that way of thinking has done to this country and its diverse body of citizens.

Right here in Minnesota, a recent study from the Wilder Foundation found that 37 percent of people in Dakota, Washington, and Ramsey counties still say they get nervous walking into a room of people from other races, if they are the only one of their own race present. One third of these same folks say they strongly or somewhat agree that they would like to get to know people of other races better, but often feel as if they might be ridiculed or shamed if they say the wrong thing. Combine that with the disheartening statistics on education and housing disparities by race in this state and it’s hard to deny that racism is still an issue that needs much attention.  

Who will step up to help bridge the cultural and institutional divide that racial tensions have spawned? How exactly do you confront racism in a way that is both implicating and welcoming? These are all goals of the Facing Race ‘We’re all in this together’ Initiative. Hosts, Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O'Connell will discuss these issues of racism that are subtly embedded in our societal structure today as we talk about their upcoming Facing Race Ambassador Awards ceremony, happening the evening after our broadcast, and what these folks are doing to shed light on the privileges and the fears that continue to perpetuate racism in this country.  

TTT’s MICHELLE ALIMORADI and TOM O’CONNELL talk with key figures in this year’s Awards event. 

On-air guests: 

JOSIE JOHNSON- former University of Minnesota Regent; retired University of Minnesota Associate Vice President for Minority Student Affairs; Founder, UofM Office of Diversity & Equity, and Honoree - Josie R. Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award; Principal, Josie Robinson Johnson & Associates Consulting, and recipient of a 2013 Facing Race Amabassador Award.

 


CORINTH MATERA- Teacher, South High School, Minneapolis. Corinth was nominated for a Facing Race Ambassador Award for her work in creating an education unit addressing the U.S. Dakota War of 1862.  Ms. Matera has been a leader in promoting this education unit, and it has reached over 600 students in the past three years.

 

DR MANUEL PASTOR- Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Southern California; His most recent book, published in 2010,  is Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future. Keynote speaker at this year’s Facing Race Awards Ceremony. 


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Monday, April 22, 2013

Ed. NOTE: This week, TruthToTell looks at Earth Day as an entrepreneurial and responsible opportunity. Our colleague and engineer, Kel Heyl, himself a green contractor, offered to help assemble this program and offers, too, this reflection on the Day’s creation and this year’s TTT approach to celebrating this now iconic annual reminder of our human responsibility to protect the planet in all ways possible – and, ironically, as businesses new and adapted:

Making Cents of Earth Day

It’s the summer of 1969. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, already considered a champion of the protecting the natural world, had visited an oil spill site in Santa Barbara, California. On his return flight he was reading an article about various “teach-ins” on college campuses dealing with Vietnam, when…“It popped into my head. That’s it! Why not have an environmental teach-in and get everyone involved?”

Senator Nelson returned to Washington and quickly formed a non-profit – Environmental Teach-In, Inc. – recruiting a few Republicans and conservationists to help with the project. On September 20, 1969 he went public with his mission from Seattle:

“I am convinced that the same concern the youth of this nation took in changing this nation’s priorities on the war in Vietnam and on civil rights can be shown for the problems of the environment. Young people can take the leadership away from the indifferent, venal men who are concerned with progress and profit for the sake of progress and profit alone…”

After considering a number of names like Environment Day and Ecology Day, they settled on the appellation, “Earth Day.” Nelson chose the date to maximize participation on college campuses. The week of April 19–25 did not fall during exams or spring break and did not conflict with Easter or Passover. It was late enough to ensure good weather. During the middle of the week there would be more students in class and no competition from other events – so Wednesday, April 22, 1970 was anointed as the target day. When critics later pointed out it was Lenin’s birthday, Nelson replied that it was also the birthday of both St. Francis of Assisi, the nature saint, and his own Aunt Tillie.

The above was excerpted from this article. In September,1995, Sen. Nelson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In keeping with the spirit of the times, much of the work flowing from those first Earth Days were seeking top-down large-scale Federal legislation and regulation.

What makes progressive change so difficult now is that a sizeable percentage of the American people are inserting their heads into deep holes they purchase from entities whose short-term bottom lines are enhanced by maintaining unsustainable patterns of consumption. Just regulating industry will not yield a viable future. Today, we look at small-scale day-to-day successes with special attention directed to increasingly sophisticated tools that allow us to make sustainable decisions and how an NGO is becoming a de facto global standard.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead our guests through their work on three different points along the sustainability continuum. Each runs a businesses which helps clients make better informed decisions – decisions which make their futures more sustainable without further disrupting the present.

GUESTS:

CINDY OJCZYK – Principal of Simply Green Design and A More Beautiful Home.

RAMY SALIM  –  OwnerSunny Day Earth SolutionsCompleted the first City issued permitted straw bale building in over a decade 

DALE FORSBERG – President of Watson-Forsberg Contracting; specialist in LEED*

*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – a point based rating system used to answer the questions: How green is this design or building. It was created by theUnited States Green Building Council.

 

TruthToTell, Monday, April 22-9AM: EARTH DAY 2013: A Wise Entrepreneurial Approach; TruthToTell, April 15: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS III: Re-entry Issues for Ex-Offenders (AUDIO & VIDEO)

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 22, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ed. NOTE: This week, TruthToTell looks at Earth Day as an entrepreneurial and responsible opportunity. Our colleague and engineer, Kel Heyl, himself a green contractor, offered to help assemble this program and offers, too, this reflection on the Day’s creation and this year’s TTT approach to celebrating this now iconic annual reminder of our human responsibility to protect the planet in all ways possible – and, ironically, as businesses new and adapted:

Making Cents of Earth Day

It’s the summer of 1969. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, already considered a champion of the protecting the natural world, had visited an oil spill site in Santa Barbara, California. On his return flight he was reading an article about various “teach-ins” on college campuses dealing with Vietnam, when…“It popped into my head. That’s it! Why not have an environmental teach-in and get everyone involved?”

Senator Nelson returned to Washington and quickly formed a non-profit – Environmental Teach-In, Inc. – recruiting a few Republicans and conservationists to help with the project. On September 20, 1969 he went public with his mission from Seattle:

“I am convinced that the same concern the youth of this nation took in changing this nation’s priorities on the war in Vietnam and on civil rights can be shown for the problems of the environment. Young people can take the leadership away from the indifferent, venal men who are concerned with progress and profit for the sake of progress and profit alone…”

After considering a number of names like Environment Day and Ecology Day, they settled on the appellation, “Earth Day.” Nelson chose the date to maximize participation on college campuses. The week of April 19–25 did not fall during exams or spring break and did not conflict with Easter or Passover. It was late enough to ensure good weather. During the middle of the week there would be more students in class and no competition from other events – so Wednesday, April 22, 1970 was anointed as the target day. When critics later pointed out it was Lenin’s birthday, Nelson replied that it was also the birthday of bothSt. Francis of Assisi, the nature saint, and his own Aunt Tillie.

The above was excerpted from this article. In September,1995, Sen. Nelson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In keeping with the spirit of the times, much of the work flowing from those first Earth Days were seeking top-down large-scale Federal legislation and regulation.

What makes progressive change so difficult now is that a sizeable percentage of the American people are inserting their heads into deep holes they purchase from entities whose short-term bottom lines are enhanced by maintaining unsustainable patterns of consumption. Just regulating industry will not yield a viable future. Today, we look at small-scale day-to-day successes with special attention directed to increasingly sophisticated tools that allow us to make sustainable decisions and how an NGO is becoming a de facto global standard.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead our guests through their work on three different points along the sustainability continuum. Each runs a businesses which helps clients make better informed decisions – decisions which make their futures more sustainable without further disrupting the present.

GUESTS:

CINDY OJCZYK – Principal of Simply Green Design and A More Beautiful Home.

RAMY SALIM  –  OwnerSunny Day Earth SolutionsCompleted the first City issued permitted straw bale building in over a decade 

DALE FORSBERG – President of Watson-Forsberg Contracting; specialist in LEED*

*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – a point based rating system used to answer the questions: How green is this design or building. It was created by the United States Green Building Council.

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An explosion of books, televisions show, seminars and public policy proposals in the last two or three years has raised the curtain on some of this country’s most shameful corrections practices, 
most of them having been imposed in peaks and valleys since the official, if not the de facto demise of Jim Crow across the states that dared to thumb their noses at the Constitution and its 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the laws once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the law.

But Jim Crow never really died. It just stuck itself into the criminal justice and correction systems of every state and the Federal government, thanks to paranoid and expedient political fears over some notion that law and order was out of control – a perception with no solid evidence. In addition to the amazingly disproportionate ratio of men of color serving time in our penitentiaries, their wildly disparate treatment in the streets and criminal justice system has been part of an even larger packing of the jails and prisons in the last few decades.

So. What happens in a country with such injustice as we’ve seen in the economy, job losses and permanent unemployment? What happens when poverty entrenches itself in our core cities and deep rural settings? What happens when it becomes obvious to young men and women who’ve been raised in abusive family settings, without adequate nutrition to feed their hungry stomachs and their hungry minds, without decent educational settings and successful learning? Anger, frustration, despair, desperation and, very often, severe mental illness sometimes driving all of it in the face of being blamed and sometimes beaten for their just being there. These are the seeds and the soil for growing discontent, drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, sometimes damned serious crime. What follows is capture, prosecution, conviction and hard time, sometimes lots of it. But sometimes, if conditions are right, a second chance might come along with a sentence of probation, even for felonies.

Still, in the heat of the lock-‘em-up-and-throw-away-the-key punishment fervor of the judgmental post-World War II lingering of the Great Depression, longer and longer sentences, more disparity in the treatment of offenders, especially by race and poverty levels, many politicians decided that no crime should ever stop going unpunished, and instituted all manner of laws insisting that, like Inspector Jauvert from Les Miserables: no matter the crime, once a crook, always a crook, and, like Jauvert’s lifetime pursuit of the offender Jean Valjean, we often see police and corrections systems pursuing ex-offenders all but forever. Landlords refuse to rent, banks refuse to finance, employers refuse to hire, and, worst of all, governments refuse to restore voting rights – all but guaranteeing a higher recidivism rate – or return to prison – of those freed from prison. What has never left us, is the racism.

All of this AFTER, mind you, the felons or offenders have actually completed their sentences.

In recent years, many advocates, especially those in the landmark Minnesota-based Second Chance Coalition, have stepped to the plate to change the climate of post-incarceration or imprisonment to one of restoration. Restoration of the right to a job,  to live somewhere affordable, and, finally, to vote again. In other words – a return to humanity and citizenship.

It’s been a long slog for these advocates, some working to transition offenders back into the outside world, some to find them jobs and housing, and still others who haunt those halls of the Capitol trying to change the ways laws deal with the restoration of what many consider to be human and/or civil rights.

Only education, involvement and the dropping of our prejudices about those who have paid their debts can we begin to see the fruits of our humanity.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 This program was recorded at Headquarters of Community Partner, Goodwill/Easter Seals. Community Partner St. Paul Neighborhood Network’s cameras are rolling and recording this show for airing tonight at 8:00 and beyond on both St. Paul’s cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. And we will distribute this program widely throughout the Metro and Minnesota wherever we can.

We thank the staff of Goodwill/Easter Seals, especially Deanna Gulliford and Lisa Ritter, for their hospitality and recruiting much of the audience. The program began with a short video - which you can watch here.

TTT'S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI host Part Three of our Community Connections series, funded by a grant from the Bush Foundation. 

GUESTS/Panelists:

SARAH CATHERINE WALKER – former Chief Operating Officer of 180 Degrees; Co-founding Co-chair of the Second Chance Coalition

STATE SEN. DAVE THOMPSON (R-Lakeville) – Assistant Minority Leader; Ranking Minority Member of the Tax Reform Division of the Senate Taxes Committee

 


MARK HAASE – Vice President for Projects and Operations at Council on Crime & Justice; Co-chair, Second Chance Coalition

ROB STEWART – University of Minnesota Doctoral Student in Sociology; Former Felon

TruthToTell, Monday, April 15 - 9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS III: Re-entry Issues for Ex-Offenders;

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 15, 2013

 

An explosion of books, televisions show, seminars and public policy proposals in the last two or three years has raised the curtain on some of this country’s most shameful corrections practices, most of them having been imposed in peaks and valleys since the official, if not the de facto demise of Jim Crow across the states that dared to thumb their noses at the Constitution and its 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the laws once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the law.

But Jim Crow never really died. It just stuck itself into the criminal justice and correction systems of every state and the Federal government, thanks to paranoid and expedient political fears over some notion that law and order was out of control – a perception with no solid evidence. In addition to the amazingly disproportionate ratio of men of color serving time in our penitentiaries, their wildly disparate treatment in the streets and criminal justice system has been part of an even larger packing of the jails and prisons in the last few decades.

So. What happens in a country with such injustice as we’ve seen in the economy, job losses and permanent unemployment? What happens when poverty entrenches itself in our core cities and deep rural settings? What happens when it becomes obvious to young men and women who’ve been raised in abusive family settings, without adequate nutrition to feed their hungry stomachs and their hungry minds, without decent educational settings and successful learning? Anger, frustration, despair, desperation and, very often, severe mental illness sometimes driving all of it in the face of being blamed and sometimes beaten for their just being there. These are the seeds and the soil for growing discontent, drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, sometimes damned serious crime. What follows is capture, prosecution, conviction and hard time, sometimes lots of it. But sometimes, if conditions are right, a second chance might come along with a sentence of probation, even for felonies.

Still, in the heat of the lock-‘em-up-and-throw-away-the-key punishment fervor of the judgmental post-World War II lingering of the Great Depression, longer and longer sentences, more disparity in the treatment of offenders, especially by race and poverty levels, many politicians decided that no crime should ever stopgoing unpunished, and instituted all manner of laws insisting that, like Inspector Jauvert from Les Miserables: no matter the crime, once a crook, always a crook, and, like Jauvert’s lifetime pursuit of the offender Jean Valjean, we often see police and corrections systems pursuing ex-offenders all but forever. Landlords refuse to rent, banks refuse to finance, employers refuse to hire, and, worst of all, governments refuse to restore voting rights – all but guaranteeing a higher recidivism rate – or return to prison – of those freed from prison. What has never left us, is the racism.

All of this AFTER, mind you, the felons or offenders have actually completed their sentences.

In recent years, many advocates, especially those in the landmark Minnesota-based Second Chance Coalition, have stepped to the plate to change the climate of post-incarceration or imprisonment to one of restoration. Restoration of the right to a job,  to live somewhere affordable, and, finally, to vote again. In other words – a return to humanity and citizenship.

It’s been a long slog for these advocates, some working to transition offenders back into the outside world, some to find them jobs and housing, and still others who haunt those halls of the Capitol trying to change the ways laws deal with the restoration of what many consider to be human and/or civil rights.

Only education, involvement and the dropping of our prejudices about those who have paid their debts can we begin to see the fruits of our humanity.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 This program was recorded at Headquarters of Community Partner, Goodwill/Easter Seals. Community Partner St. Paul Neighborhood Network’s cameras are rolling and recording this show for airing tonight at 8:00 and beyond on both St. Paul’s cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. And we will distribute this program widely throughout the Metro and Minnesota wherever we can.

We thank the staff of Goodwill/Easter Seals, especially Deanna Gulliford and Lisa Ritter, for their hospitality and recruiting much of the audience. The program began with a short video - which you can watch here.

TTT'S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI host Part Three of our Community Connections series, funded by a grant from the Bush Foundation. 

GUESTS/Panelists:

SARAH CATHERINE WALKER – former Chief Operating Officer of 180 Degrees; Co-founding Co-chair of the Second Chance Coalition

STATE SEN. DAVE THOMPSON (R-Lakeville) – Assistant Minority Leader; Ranking Minority Member of the Tax Reform Division of the Senate Taxes Committee

 


MARK HAASE – Vice President for Projects and Operations at Council on Crime & Justice; Co-chair, Second Chance Coalition

ROB STEWART – University of Minnesota Doctoral Student in Sociology; Former Felon

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 8, 2013

HEY! It’s SPRING MEMBERSHIP DRIVE TIME at KFAI – a perfect opportunity to show your support for BOTH KFAI – the Mother Ship for TruthToTell – AND TruthToTell itself. 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It’s possible that 2012’s Election results have significantly changed the climate for immigration reform across the US. Last June, President Obama has issued anExecutive Order allowing children of undocumented workers a great deal of leeway toward seeking education and serving in the military without fear of deportation.

Nevertheless, some barriers remain to making certain standards apply to those same young people and their parents when it comes to paying in-state or resident tuition rates and applying for and receiving drivers’ licenses not only in Minnesota, but many other states. This makes life uncertain for many of those aspiring new Americans in going from state to state or changing residence. One of the worst is surely the inability of Minnesota’s college-bound undocumented high-schoolers and adults the least expensive tuition rates possible.

For children living here to pay out-of-state or nonresident tuition, which can double and triple their cost of post-secondary education seems idiotic on its face. But the anti-immigrant, anti-undocumented fervor among certain blocs of legislators and voters that dictated the tougher stance in earlier years, despite the contributions those same workers make to the comfort of us all, not to mention the taxes they pay, may be melting under the  heat of the last election, including the shifting majorities in the Minnesota Legislature.

Bills in both houses to relieve such young people and their parents from facing those previous barriers to full resident privileges are wending their way through relevant committees, each sponsored by core constituent representative and senators and backed by a wide range of business and advocacy groups, and guided by several spokespeople, including our guests this week.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with those advocates and at least one sponsor of one of those bills about just what those new laws would allow, if passed.

GUESTS:

SEN. SANDY PAPPAS – President of the Minnesota Senate and Chair, State and Local Government Committee; Author of Senate File 723 (MN Dream Act), (co-sponsored by Sens.Torres Ray, Cohen, Franzen and Hayden; House Companion, HF875, Authored by Rep. Carlos Mariani and a bi-partisan list of co-sponsors).*


 

FRANCISCO SEGOVIA – Director, Waite House of Pillsbury United Communities

NESTOR GOMEZ – DEEP Youth Organizer, Tamales y Bicicletas (Food & Environmental Justice advocacy)

 

*Drivers’ License (Licencias para Todos – Licenses for All) bills HF348 and SF271 can also be found online.

 

TruthToTell, Monday, April 8 - 9AM: MINNESOTA'S DREAM: Schooling and Driving without Deportation; TruthToTell, Monday, April 1 - 9AM: REPEAT SPECIAL: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going

UPCOMING SHOW

HEY! It’s SPRING MEMBERSHIP DRIVE TIME at KFAI – a perfect opportunity to show your support for BOTH KFAI – the Mother Ship for TruthToTell – ANDTruthToTell itself.

This year it’s a BIG DEAL! Why? Because the Mother Ship has so much in the offing to make your radio listening and grassroots participation in our Community-Based Independent Public Radio station 1,000 times better!! We’ll sound better and have much better equipment – with YOUR HELP.

Call us NOW and during TTT Monday at 612-375-9030 to pledge your support to this 35-year-old membership-driven, volunteer –driven community asset! 612-375-9030 – OR – PLEDGE at KFAI.org. – AND – Come on down or over to KFAI and volunteer to answer phones. That info is also available online.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 8, 2013

THEN: Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It’s possible that 2012’s Election results have significantly changed the climate for immigration reform across the US. Last June, President Obama has issued anExecutive Order allowing children of undocumented workers a great deal of leeway toward seeking education and serving in the military without fear of deportation.

Nevertheless, some barriers remain to making certain standards apply to those same young people and their parents when it comes to paying in-state or resident tuition rates and applying for and receiving drivers’ licenses not only in Minnesota, but many other states. This makes life uncertain for many of those aspiring new Americans in going from state to state or changing residence. One of the worst is surely the inability of Minnesota’s college-bound undocumented high-schoolers and adults the least expensive tuition rates possible.

For children living here to pay out-of-state or nonresident tuition, which can double and triple their cost of post-secondary education seems idiotic on its face. But the anti-immigrant, anti-undocumented fervor among certain blocs of legislators and voters that dictated the tougher stance in earlier years, despite the contributions those same workers make to the comfort of us all, not to mention the taxes they pay, may be melting under the  heat of the last election, including the shifting majorities in the Minnesota Legislature.

Bills in both houses to relieve such young people and their parents from facing those previous barriers to full resident privileges are wending their way through relevant committees, each sponsored by core constituent representative and senators and backed by a wide range of business and advocacy groups, and guided by several spokespeople, including our guests this week.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with those advocates and at least one sponsor of one of those bills about just what those new laws would allow, if passed.

GUESTS:

SEN. SANDY PAPPAS – President of the Minnesota Senate and Chair, State and Local Government Committee; Author of Senate File 723 (MN Dream Act), (co-sponsored by Sens.Torres Ray, Cohen, Franzen and Hayden; House Companion, HF875, Authored by Rep. Carlos Mariani and a bi-partisan list of co-sponsors).*


 

FRANCISCO SEGOVIA – Director, Waite House of Pillsbury United Communities

NESTOR GOMEZ – DEEP Youth Organizer, Tamales y Bicicletas (Food & Environmental Justice advocacy)

 

*Drivers’ License (Licencias para Todos – Licenses for All) bills HF348 and SF271 can also be found online.

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 1, 2013

NOTE: This IS A REPEAT of our Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

AUDIO HERE and below. VIDEO HERE

Television Repeats - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

DATE CORRECT: TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota