TTT newsletter archives

Here is an archive list of all published newsletter issues with the most recent issue listed first.

REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II-Monday March 18, 9AM–Health Insurance Exchanges - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming @ KFAI.org

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

SPECIAL TruthToTell UPDATE: Community Connections II–Health Insurance Exchanges under “Obamacare” Taping/Airing March 13th at the Wilder Foundation–St. Paul

 

COME JOIN THE CONVERSATION on HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGES!!!

LIVE FROM THE WILDER FOUNDATION this WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH. BE THERE BY 6:30PM.

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts will take place on March 13th, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building (map) at 451 Lexington Parkway in Saint Paul near University Ave starting at 6:30PM. This important discussion will cover the key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act. ALL Minnesotans are invited and encouraged to join the audience that night ... or LISTEN in at 7:00 PM on KFAI FM 90.3/106.7 or streamed at www.KFAI.org.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, or MA.MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). This coming Wednesday is the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – CoChair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, SmallBusinessMN.org

SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II–Health Insurance Exchanges under “Obamacare” Taping/Airing March 13th at the Wilder Foundation–St. Paul

 

COME JOIN THE CONVERSATION on HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGES!!!

LIVE FROM THE WILDER FOUNDATION this WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH. BE THERE BY 6:30PM.

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts will take place on March 13th, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building (map) at 451 Lexington Parkway in Saint Paul near University Ave starting at 6:30PM. This important discussion will cover the key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act. ALL Minnesotans are invited and encouraged to join the audience that night ... or LISTEN in at 7:00 PM on KFAI FM 90.3/106.7 or streamed at www.KFAI.org.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, or MA.MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). This coming Wednesday is the first of our live productions.

GUEST PANELISTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – CoChair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

DATE CORRECTION: TruthToTell, Monday, March 11- 9AM: IGNORANT and ANGRY POLITICS: Two Perspectives on History and the Future; TruthToTell March 4: TESTING TO THE TEACHER: Failing the Grade

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 11, 2013

TruthToTell: Community Connections II–Health Insurance Exchanges under“Obamacare” Taping/Airing March 13th at the Wilder Foundation – St. Paul

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which).

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts will take place on March 13th, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building(map) at 451 Lexington Parkway in Saint Paul near University Ave starting at 6:30PM. This important discussion will cover the key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.Interested Minnesotans are encouraged to join the audience that night. TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Monday, March 11- 9AM: IGNORANT and ANGRY POLITICS: Two Perspectives on History and the Future - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming @KFAI.org

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 “Civic Design is a practice that focuses on the common good outcomes of our communities by pulling upon all of the institutional tools in our communities, beyond our traditional sole focus on government alone. Regulating our communities into better health and prosperity, writ large, is more than passing laws and warring over angry left vs. right politics. We cannot afford that type of narrow thinking anymore, and that is more than a mere financial commentary. We simply cannot afford to be that uncreative in these historically dynamic times.
— Nate Garvis, Author of Naked Civics: Strip Away the Politics to Build a Better World

There is a pack mentality among legislators who often turn to trendy and untested ideas and the need for quick fixes. The power of money in politics, partisanship, special interest pressures, and sometimes simply ideology or even blindness to the facts all contribute to situations where so-called new ideas are really recycled old ones already proven to have failed." 
— David Schultz, Author of American Politics in the Age of Ignorance: Why Lawmakers Choose Belief over Research (read some)

Nate Garvis and Prof. David Schultz – who might not agree on what each might define as the “common good” or on the role many of our cultural institutions play in our lives (or should) – find themselves, if we’re reading them correctly, not far from each other’s positions on many of the fundamental problems facing American politics today.

Does ignorance of science, the basics of history and the social construct Schultz sees operating in the setting of repeated policy failures in an a nation that purports to be a democracy feed into the increasing anger and increasingly un-civil debate Garvis describes as the very un-creative means by which we govern ourselves in this age?

These two active Minnesota political commentators, one immersed more in the academic sphere than the maelstrom of commerce from which emerges the other (Garvis) are clearly more than a little frustrated by the tenor of the political climate in their two, relatively recent, books on the how citizenship and public policy play out in this 21st Century of rampant informational resources and public platforms where – and this is one question Schulz poses – politicians may or may not be as angry as they come off, depending on whether one is pandering to an electorate already seething over a variety of issues made worse by an unwillingness to accept science and history and fact as the basis for political judgments. Then again, those same political aspirants may well hold those values and beliefs as deeply as their audiences. But, what does that say, then about the politicians’ preparedness for public office?

That said, then, how can Nate Garvis’ own frustration over partisanship be resolved when the anger he decries may be rooted in the necessary polarization to justify the ignorance Schultz has observed?

Listeners get a chance to hear what may well be a heady conversation among us political junkies over the historical and future role of education, emotion and practical politics on voting behavior and public policymaking during this time of unceasing political turmoil, fed by either a complacent or voracious media monster, depending on which head is currently dominant.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI try to dissect these different ideas for civic engagement – which is our mission and that of our parent, CivicMedia/Minnesota – and see where the have a meeting of the minds and where they digress. Should be both serious and fun (see Carrot Design).

GUESTS:

DAVID SCHULTZ, PhD – Professor of Public Administration and government ethics at Hamline University School of Business; Author, American Politics in the Age of Ignorance

NATE GARVIS – Founder, Civic Thought Leader at Naked Civics; Author, Naked Civics

 


AND YOU! 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 4, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Much has been made of the effectiveness of constantly testing students with standardized and  formula tests to measure teacher performance as well as student achievement. The general conclusion: testing does little to raise the quality of either teaching or learning because, inevitably, most educators observe, the testing becomes the tool and not the learning and exposure to real life experiences that many agree result in far more effective education.

Teaching to the test has become the feared mantra for most educators, whether we’re testing teachers or students.

And, yet, just last year, despite the frequent split between teacher supporters like DFL legislators, most often also endorsed by the teachers’ union, Education Minnesota, and Republican teachers union critics, both Republican-led houses mustered large bipartisan majorities to up the ante in teacher licensure requirements by enacting a law to require teachers to pass a series of basic skills tests in reading, writing and math – before receiving certification to teach in public schools. Before that change, teachers would have to take the tests, yes, but, if they failed, could be temporarily certified and allowed in the classroom while they kept trying for up to three years.

No more. Without passing the basic skills tests, certification is withheld; so…no job until they make it.

DFL Governor Mark Dayton signed the revision bill last session.

Minnesota Teacher Licensure Examinations –the MTLE – are all part of the overall certification process teachers must undergo, overseen by the Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT). Teacher licensure has been the subject of much debate over the years: are current standards adequate to measure teacher preparedness or ability to stand before 30 or more students and pass on knowledge some skeptics think the teachers themselves may lack?

And yet…when does testing become punishment rather than a measurement tool or incentive?

Taking those basic skills exams is expensive – each test costing teacher candidates well over $100 including annual testing fees. And those are charges aspiring teachers who fail them must pay over and over again. And, under that law passed last year – those fees are paid every time the test is taken – an expensive proposition.

Readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic. If you can’t do it all, you’re out. You can ace two of the three, but…fail one, and…it’s over. What about people who simply don’t test well. Thousands don’t. Who makes up these tests, anyway? The testing company wouldn’t cop to it. What about the test content? Is it completely nonbiased? Could it ever not be, given the multicultural nature of the populations likely taking them, in spite of a desperate need for finding teachers who look like the students under their charge?

And the biggest question of all: are these tests sufficient measures of teacher effectiveness. Stories abound about the many teachers considered whiz-bang conveyors of learning in the classroom, but when told to take a test containing problems or stories completely out of their ken, find themselves on the outside looking in.

Now, add in the elements of race and class and ethnic origin, and the scores become abysmal, given our US penchant for second-class education among our communities of poverty and color.

Now a bill to repeal the whole basic skills burden for graduate teachers just about ready to enter the classroom and support for that proposition is under consideration in both houses.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring several stakeholders into the studio or on the phone to talk about their studies and experiences with all this testing, including the author of the Senate bill to repeal the skills tests altogether.

GUESTS:

STATE SEN. KEVIN DAHLE (DFL, Northfield [Dist. 20]) – Vice Chair, Senate Education Committee; Member, E-12 Division of Senate Finance; Author Senate File 429 (companion House File 171 [Rep. John Ward]

DR. CHRISTOPHER SMITH – Assistant Professor & Assessment Coordinator, Augsburg College; Co-author (with Audrey Lensmire) of an Augsburg study on MTLE and Basic Skills Examinations.

KAYLA VANDENHEUVEL and KRISTEN FILDES – Teaching candidates/Junior year students,Minnesota State University at Moorhead; Co-Founders, MinnesotaVOICE (Voicing Our Important Concerns in Education) - Pre-service Teacher Advocates

SCOTT CROONQUIST – Executive Director, Association of Metropolitan School Districts

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 4- 9AM: IGNORANT and ANGRY POLITICS: Two Perspectives on History and the Future; TruthToTell March 4: TESTING TO THE TEACHER: Failing the Grade

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 11, 2013

TruthToTell: Community Connections II–Health Insurance Exchanges under“Obamacare” Taping/Airing March 13th at the Wilder Foundation – St. Paul

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which).

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts will take place on March 13th, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building(map) at 451 Lexington Parkway in Saint Paul near University Ave starting at 6:30PM. This important discussion will cover the key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.Interested Minnesotans are encouraged to join the audience that night. TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Monday, March 4- 9AM: IGNORANT and ANGRY POLITICS: Two Perspectives on History and the Future - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming @KFAI.org

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 “Civic Design is a practice that focuses on the common good outcomes of our communities by pulling upon all of the institutional tools in our communities, beyond our traditional sole focus on government alone. Regulating our communities into better health and prosperity, writ large, is more than passing laws and warring over angry left vs. right politics. We cannot afford that type of narrow thinking anymore, and that is more than a mere financial commentary. We simply cannot afford to be that uncreative in these historically dynamic times.
— Nate Garvis, Author of Naked Civics: Strip Away the Politics to Build a Better World

There is a pack mentality among legislators who often turn to trendy and untested ideas and the need for quick fixes. The power of money in politics, partisanship, special interest pressures, and sometimes simply ideology or even blindness to the facts all contribute to situations where so-called new ideas are really recycled old ones already proven to have failed." 
— David Schultz, Author of American Politics in the Age of Ignorance: Why Lawmakers Choose Belief over Research (read some)

Nate Garvis and Prof. David Schultz – who might not agree on what each might define as the “common good” or on the role many of our cultural institutions play in our lives (or should) – find themselves, if we’re reading them correctly, not far from each other’s positions on many of the fundamental problems facing American politics today.

Does ignorance of science, the basics of history and the social construct Schultz sees operating in the setting of repeated policy failures in an a nation that purports to be a democracy feed into the increasing anger and increasingly un-civil debate Garvis describes as the very un-creative means by which we govern ourselves in this age?

These two active Minnesota political commentators, one immersed more in the academic sphere than the maelstrom of commerce from which emerges the other (Garvis) are clearly more than a little frustrated by the tenor of the political climate in their two, relatively recent, books on the how citizenship and public policy play out in this 21st Century of rampant informational resources and public platforms where – and this is one question Schulz poses – politicians may or may not be as angry as they come off, depending on whether one is pandering to an electorate already seething over a variety of issues made worse by an unwillingness to accept science and history and fact as the basis for political judgments. Then again, those same political aspirants may well hold those values and beliefs as deeply as their audiences. But, what does that say, then about the politicians’ preparedness for public office?

That said, then, how can Nate Garvis’ own frustration over partisanship be resolved when the anger he decries may be rooted in the necessary polarization to justify the ignorance Schultz has observed?

Listeners get a chance to hear what may well be a heady conversation among us political junkies over the historical and future role of education, emotion and practical politics on voting behavior and public policymaking during this time of unceasing political turmoil, fed by either a complacent or voracious media monster, depending on which head is currently dominant.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI try to dissect these different ideas for civic engagement – which is our mission and that of our parent, CivicMedia/Minnesota – and see where the have a meeting of the minds and where they digress. Should be both serious and fun (see Carrot Design).

GUESTS:

DAVID SCHULTZ, PhD – Professor of Public Administration and government ethics at Hamline University School of Business; Author, American Politics in the Age of Ignorance

NATE GARVIS – Founder, Civic Thought Leader at Naked Civics; Author, Naked Civics

 


AND YOU! 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 4, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Much has been made of the effectiveness of constantly testing students with standardized and  formula tests to measure teacher performance as well as student achievement. The general conclusion: testing does little to raise the quality of either teaching or learning because, inevitably, most educators observe, the testing becomes the tool and not the learning and exposure to real life experiences that many agree result in far more effective education.

Teaching to the test has become the feared mantra for most educators, whether we’re testing teachers or students.

And, yet, just last year, despite the frequent split between teacher supporters like DFL legislators, most often also endorsed by the teachers’ union, Education Minnesota, and Republican teachers union critics, both Republican-led houses mustered large bipartisan majorities to up the ante in teacher licensure requirements by enacting a law to require teachers to pass a series of basic skills tests in reading, writing and math – before receiving certification to teach in public schools. Before that change, teachers would have to take the tests, yes, but, if they failed, could be temporarily certified and allowed in the classroom while they kept trying for up to three years.

No more. Without passing the basic skills tests, certification is withheld; so…no job until they make it.

DFL Governor Mark Dayton signed the revision bill last session.

Minnesota Teacher Licensure Examinations –the MTLE – are all part of the overall certification process teachers must undergo, overseen by the Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT). Teacher licensure has been the subject of much debate over the years: are current standards adequate to measure teacher preparedness or ability to stand before 30 or more students and pass on knowledge some skeptics think the teachers themselves may lack?

And yet…when does testing become punishment rather than a measurement tool or incentive?

Taking those basic skills exams is expensive – each test costing teacher candidates well over $100 including annual testing fees. And those are charges aspiring teachers who fail them must pay over and over again. And, under that law passed last year – those fees are paid every time the test is taken – an expensive proposition.

Readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic. If you can’t do it all, you’re out. You can ace two of the three, but…fail one, and…it’s over. What about people who simply don’t test well. Thousands don’t. Who makes up these tests, anyway? The testing company wouldn’t cop to it. What about the test content? Is it completely nonbiased? Could it ever not be, given the multicultural nature of the populations likely taking them, in spite of a desperate need for finding teachers who look like the students under their charge?

And the biggest question of all: are these tests sufficient measures of teacher effectiveness. Stories abound about the many teachers considered whiz-bang conveyors of learning in the classroom, but when told to take a test containing problems or stories completely out of their ken, find themselves on the outside looking in.

Now, add in the elements of race and class and ethnic origin, and the scores become abysmal, given our US penchant for second-class education among our communities of poverty and color.

Now a bill to repeal the whole basic skills burden for graduate teachers just about ready to enter the classroom and support for that proposition is under consideration in both houses.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring several stakeholders into the studio or on the phone to talk about their studies and experiences with all this testing, including the author of the Senate bill to repeal the skills tests altogether.

GUESTS:

STATE SEN. KEVIN DAHLE (DFL, Northfield [Dist. 20]) – Vice Chair, Senate Education Committee; Member, E-12 Division of Senate Finance; Author Senate File 429 (companion House File 171 [Rep. John Ward]

DR. CHRISTOPHER SMITH – Assistant Professor & Assessment Coordinator, Augsburg College; Co-author (with Audrey Lensmire) of an Augsburg study on MTLE and Basic Skills Examinations.

KAYLA VANDENHEUVEL and KRISTEN FILDES – Teaching candidates/Junior year students,Minnesota State University at Moorhead; Co-Founders, MinnesotaVOICE (Voicing Our Important Concerns in Education) - Pre-service Teacher Advocates

SCOTT CROONQUIST – Executive Director, Association of Metropolitan School Districts

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 4- 9AM: TESTING THE TEACHER: Failing the Grade; TruthToTell Feb. 25: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 4, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Much has been made of the effectiveness of constantly testing students with standardized and  formula tests to measure teacher performance as well as student achievement. The general conclusion: testing does little to raise the quality of either teaching or learning because, inevitably, most educators observe, the testing becomes the tool and not the learning and exposure to real life experiences that many agree result in far more effective education.

Teaching to the test has become the feared mantra for most educators, whether we’re testing teachers or students.

And, yet, just last year, despite the frequent split between teacher supporters like DFL legislators, most often also endorsed by the teachers’ union, Education Minnesota, and Republican teachers union critics, both Republican-led houses mustered large bipartisan majorities to up the ante in teacher licensure requirements by enacting a law to require teachers to pass a series of basic skills tests in reading, writing and math – before receiving certification to teach in public schools. Before that change, teachers would have to take the tests, yes, but, if they failed, could be temporarily certified and allowed in the classroom while they kept trying for up to three years.

No more. Without passing the basic skills tests, certification is withheld; so…no job until they make it.

DFL Governor Mark Dayton signed the revision bill last session.

Minnesota Teacher Licensure Examinations –the MTLE – are all part of the overall certification process teachers must undergo, overseen by the Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT). Teacher licensure has been the subject of much debate over the years: are current standards adequate to measure teacher preparedness or ability to stand before 30 or more students and pass on knowledge some skeptics think the teachers themselves may lack?

And yet…when does testing become punishment rather than a measurement tool or incentive?

Taking those basic skills exams is expensive – each test costing teacher candidates well over $100 including annual testing fees. And those are charges aspiring teachers who fail them must pay over and over again. And, under that law passed last year – those fees are paid every time the test is taken – an expensive proposition.

Readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic. If you can’t do it all, you’re out. You can ace two of the three, but…fail one, and…it’s over. What about people who simply don’t test well. Thousands don’t. Who makes up these tests, anyway? The testing company wouldn’t cop to it. What about the test content? Is it completely nonbiased? Could it ever not be, given the multicultural nature of the populations likely taking them, in spite of a desperate need for finding teachers who look like the students under their charge?

And the biggest question of all: are these tests sufficient measures of teacher effectiveness. Stories abound about the many teachers considered whiz-bang conveyors of learning in the classroom, but when told to take a test containing problems or stories completely out of their ken, find themselves on the outside looking in.

Now, add in the elements of race and class and ethnic origin, and the scores become abysmal, given our US penchant for second-class education among our communities of poverty and color.

Now a bill to repeal the whole basic skills burden for graduate teachers just about ready to enter the classroom and support for that proposition is under consideration in both houses.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring several stakeholders into the studio or on the phone to talk about their studies and experiences with all this testing, including the author of the Senate bill to repeal the skills tests altogether.

GUESTS:

STATE SEN. KEVIN DAHLE (DFL, Northfield [Dist. 20]) – Vice Chair, Senate Education Committee; Member, E-12 Division of Senate Finance; Author Senate File 429 (companion House File 171 [Rep. John Ward]

DR. CHRISTOPHER SMITH – Assistant Professor & Assessment Coordinator, Augsburg College; Co-author (with Audrey Lensmire) of an Augsburg study on MTLE and Basic Skills Examinations.

KAYLA VANDENHEUVEL and KRISTIN FILDES – Teaching candidates/Junior year students,Minnesota State University at Moorhead; Co-Founders, MinnesotaVOICE (Voicing Our Important Concerns in Education) - Pre-service Teacher Advocates

SCOTT CROONQUIST – Executive Director, Association of Metropolitan School Districts

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, February 25, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota

 

 


RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 132, St. Paul

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 

DATE CORRECTION and LINKS REPAIR: TruthToTell, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - Audio Below & Video Archived

UPCOMING SHOW

SO SORRY FOR THE REPEAT NEWSLETTERS, BUT THE CORRECT DATES AND LINKS NEEDED REPAIR. AND NOW WE HAVE LAST WEEK'S VIDEO UP!!!

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota

 

 


RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, February 18, 2013

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

AUDIO HERE and below. VIDEO HERE

Television Repeats - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

CORRECTION: TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - Audio Below & Video Archived

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

 

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

Look for Repeat telecasts - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part of NRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM – Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

DATE CORRECTION: TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Feb. 18: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - AUDIO HERE & VIDEO Coming

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

 

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

Look for Repeat telecasts - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Feb. 18: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - AUDIO HERE & VIDEO Coming

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


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This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist