CivicMedia/Minnesota Archive

Here you can find a listing of all shows ...

Monday, October 19, 2015

Anti-Muslim comments by Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson,  a student-faculty walk-out at Columbia Heights High School, and controversy over FBI surveillance of Somali youth are just a few of the issues that keep Jaylani Hussein on point and in the news. As executive director of the Minnesota branch of the Council of American-Islamic Relations, www.cairmn.com—the nation’s leading Muslim civil rights organization—Hussein is no stranger to controversy. A recipient of the Minnesota Council of Non-Profit’s 2015 Visionary Leader Award, Hussein will share his perspective on both the progress and remaining challenges facing Minnesota’s broad and diverse Muslim community. 

Monday, October 5, 2015

The crowds have dispersed. The television images of an inspirational Pope connecting with Americans of all backgrounds in huge rallies and more intimate settings have been replaced by coverage of politics, Trump style.

University of St. Thomas theologian Paul Wojda looks back on Pope Francis’s visit to the United States and forward to the work that lies ahead. What will be the lasting impact of the Pope’s visit on the Catholic Church and the American body politic? Will his social-justice teaching create a space for a deeper dialogue on climate change, immigration, and the needs of the poor? Can the hope that Pope Francis inspired be sustained?

For ongoing coverage of the Pope from a progressive Catholic perspective go to www.ncronline.org

Monday, September 28, 2015

There is nothing new about the call for racially integrated schools. Integration was a battle cry of the civil rights movement even as it was resisted mightily by many whites. But what does integration mean in today’s schools with students from a multitude of cultures? Does integration inevitably mean a loss of cultural identity? Or is it possible to foster unity through a deep appreciation of cultural difference?

And what is the relationship between integration and equity? How do efforts at cultural understanding translate into greater educational achievement? Or do they?

These are big questions, with major ramifications for our schools and society. Their answers are forged  through  the day-to-day work of teachers, students, parents and community members, aided by specialists like the educators we have in our studio this morning.

This edition of Truth to Tell explores the quest for integration and equity though the experience of one suburban school district, the Robbinsdale Area Schools.

Monday, September 28, 2015

There is nothing new about the call for racially integrated schools. Integration was a battle cry of the civil rights movement even as it was resisted mightily by many whites. But what does integration mean in today’s schools with students from a multitude of cultures? Does integration inevitably mean a loss of cultural identity? Or is it possible to foster unity through a deep appreciation of cultural difference?

And what is the relationship between integration and equity? How do efforts at cultural understanding translate into greater educational achievement? Or do they?

These are big questions, with major ramifications for our schools and society. Their answers are forged  through  the day-to-day work of teachers, students, parents and community members, aided by specialists like the educators we have in our studio this morning.

This edition of Truth to Tell explores the quest for integration and equity though the experience of one suburban school district, the Robbinsdale Area Schools.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Through a series of dramatic demonstrations across the country, the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the troubled relationship between police and African-Americans here in the Twin Cities and across the nation. Polls show that more white Americans are now aware that unjustified acts of police directed at African-Americans do occur. At the same time, as has often happened when African-Americans and other oppressed groups organize to assert their rights, a backlash has emerged.

One striking feature of the Black Lives Matter movement has been the multi-racial composition of its demonstrations. Clearly, there are many whites and members of other ethnic communities who support the movement. But beyond marching, what role can allies play? 

 

Monday, September 7, 2015

Labor Day—what does in mean anyway? To school- aged children it means the end of summer vacation. To the rest of us it signals the end of the summer and the slow descent into . . . well we won’t dwell on that now. It is also the last day of the State Fair—and to many, a day to celebrate and reflect on the role labor unions play in our society. 

Some say that we don’t need labor unions anymore. Today’s guests beg to differ. While the face of labor changes with the times, the ability of workers to organize remains as urgent now as ever.

Monday, August 31, 2015

When is there too much of a good thing? Low-income and working-class communities—often communities of color—lack access to thriving businesses, healthy food, and decent housing.  But what happens when new investments make a neighborhood desirable to middle-class (often white) newcomers? Is it inevitable that “turning around” a neighborhood ends up turning out its low-income and working-class residents? Is gentrification inevitable? Are there ways to improve our communities without displacing the people who live there?

On today’s edition of Truth to Tell, Ralph Crowder, filmmaker and media activist, (www.freedomradioandtv.com) and Queen Nuchie, leader of 1family1community and the Poor People’s Campaign of Minnesota, discuss their efforts to preserve and strengthen the historic African-American community in South Minneapolis. Their story has lessons for inner-city neighborhoods in Minneapolis-St. Paul and across the nation.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Since the Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1960s, two approaches to racial justice have competed for community support and financial resources.  On the one hand, advocates for racial integration challenged the exclusion of African-Americans from neighborhoods, schools and employment opportunities.  Citizens of all races and ethnic backgrounds, they argued, should be able to live in any community they choose.  And along with choice of neighborhoods would come the social and economic benefits accorded whites.

Advocates of community control, on the other hand, believed that only by building up African American communities could genuine racial equity be achieved. These arguments had parallels in other ethnic and cultural communities, as well.  Today, both advocates for housing integration and placed-based development see their approach as a way to reduce racial inequities and build a sturdy path out of poverty

To explore where these paths converge—and perhaps at times  diverge—Truth to Tell will feature a conversation with Sue Watlov Phillips, executive director  of one of the region’s premier housing advocacy organizations, the Minnesota Interfaith Council of Affordable Housing.  MICAH, as it is commonly known, has joined  several inner-ring suburbs and Minneapolis community groups in legal complaints challenging policies that concentrate housing in high-poverty areas. 

Also joining the discussion are Owen Duckworth, who works on the Equity in Place initiative as coalition organizer for the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, and Nelima Sitati Munene, who helped rebuild housing in North Minneapolis in the aftermath of the recent devastating tornado and continues to work on affordable housing issues in the northwest suburbs where she resides.  Nelima also served on the Metropolitan Council’s Housing Policy Planning Work Group, which will influence housing development in the metro region for the next 25 years. 

Monday, August 17, 2015

Does everyone have a right to health care?  Is gun violence a medical issue?  How do we think about end-of-life decisions?  Embryonic research?  What about doctors who participate in torture?  Perhaps no field of human activity is more fraught with ethical issues than medicine.  And no physician has done more to raise public awareness of bio-ethical issues, than Dr. Steven Miles, professor of medicine and bioethics at the University of Minnesota. In this edition of Truth to Tell, we will explore the critical field of medical ethics by examining some of the most important—and controversial—medical issues facing our community today.

Monday, August 10, 2015

A coalition of labor unions and community organizations is calling on the city of Minneapolis to raise standards for working families by ensuring earned sick and safe time and a fair work week, putting an end to wage theft, and raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour.  The City Council has responded by setting up a working group to study the issues. Mayor Betsy Hodges has expressed strong interest in the  worker-protection proposals while stating reservations about  the $15 minimum wage hike.

Just how far can a city go in protecting its workforce?  Shouldn’t these issues be handled at the state or perhaps regional level?  Will unilateral action cost Minneapolis jobs or will a strong stand by Minnesota’s largest city spark action in St. Paul, metro suburbs, and eventually the state?