affordable

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TruthToTell, Monday, AUG 26 - 9AM: COMMUNITY LAND TRUSTS: Unheralded Housing Affordability; TruthToTell, AUG 19: ENCORE: LIVE from WHITE EARTH: Constitutional Milestone Debate-Who Will Be Enrolled?

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, August 26, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

NOW! Hear TruthToTell live OR later on the KFAI Community Radio App

That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for

Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), 

iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and 

iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

How many conversations have we had about affordable housing options around the state and Metro and, especially when foreclosures mushroomed, plus what to do about underwater mortgages when home values tanked?

And about all those unenforced efforts to create affordable housing options under Minnesota and Met Council policies, especially in suburban areas panicked over a surge in “those people” if affordable housing came to fruition?

And, then, the seemingly unstoppable flood of absentee property acquisition and ownership – and neglect – by landlords unwilling to maintain rental units and spawning the very creation of our inner city slums in what became a cycle of conditions that had institutionalized that neglect so that a century of poverty and exploitation became the norm in too many neighborhoods?

Then, the flood of well-intentioned quest for using homeownership as a tool to combat absentee neglect only to find subprime mortgages flourish and unscrupulous banks and mortgage brokers willing to throw buyers into houses they could ill-afford and into debt that took those properties away again, leaving them to fend in the streets.

And what about all those properties abandoned turning entire blocks into ballparks or prairie?

Did anyone mention community land trusts as a serious way of providing perpetually affordable land use options and affordable housing opportunities? If we did, it was in passing. No dwelling.

Monday morning, we’ll dwell on the subject a good deal longer and learn much more about what on the surface seems like an sensible and underutilized option for cities, states and Metro areas feeling responsible for providing adequate and affordable shelter for their citizens.

We can start with this question: is housing or some form of shelter a right of societal or community membership? If so, why haven’t we explored these options and supplied such shelter for all over the last 200 years around here – longer elsewhere?

What is a land trust, anyway? What and who started this concept? And why does it seem on the surface to make so much sense even for smaller communities within communities?

Of course, one must qualify and be willing to give up ownership of the land to own the house on it. We’re a land-hungry breed, so this may be tough even for the poorest among us.

Lots of questions to answer.

But we’ll do our best enlighten us all about this concept and its possibilities for all of our communities.TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with at least one Community Land Trust executive and get our questions answered about the potential for– and the limitations of – community land trusts.

GUEST(s):

JEFF WASHBURNE – Executive Director, City of Lakes Community Land Trust, Minneapolis

INVITED: GREG FINZELL – Executive Director, Rondo Community Land Trust, St. Paul

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, August 19, 2013

In concert with production partner, KKWE/Niijii RadioTruthToTelland CivicMedia/ Minnesota traveled west last Wednesday evening, August 14th, to theWhite Earth Reservation to air/televise the7th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums on critical Minnesota issues in the rooms of Community PartnerShooting Star Casino – where we taped an debate on the meaning and impacts of a proposed new home rule constitution to be voted on by White Earth Nation tribal members this Fall. This is a burning issue among members of the entire Minnesota Chippewa Tribe (MCT), whose current Constitution currently governs all Minnesota bands under its jurisdiction.

The audience consisted of all residents and enrollees affected by the proposed constitutional provisions and commentators and analysts from various Chippewa nations in Minnesota. So lively was this debate, we went almost two hours.

The edited program will be posted on websites everywhere, as well. Producer David Zierott and St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) are televising the forum as TTT’s Media Partner. Additional distribution will come on TruthToTell’s regular air slot at 9:00 AM Labor Day Monday on KFAI, and on television at 8:00 PM August 19 on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners wanted to bring this Community Connections program to affected residents of the Reservation and its neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the White Earth Band’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated over the ability to govern by democratic vote.

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

GUESTS:

ERMA VIZENOR - White Earth Tribal Chair

GERALD VIZENOR – Author/Poet, Constitution Writer

MICHAEL DAHL - White Earth Land Recovery Project Community Liaison and Niijii Radio

SHARON ENJADY - Anishinaabe Grandmother

TERRY JANIS (Lakota) - Attorney, Constitutional Reform Manager, White Earth­

 

TruthToTell, AUG 26: COMMUNITY LAND TRUSTS: Unheralded Housing Affordability - AUDIO is UP HERE; VIDEO Coming

On-air date: 
Mon, 08/26/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

NOW! Hear TruthToTell live OR later on the KFAI Community Radio App

That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for

Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), 

iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and 

iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

How many conversations have we had about affordable housing options around the state and Metro and, especially when foreclosures mushroomed, plus what to do about underwater mortgages when home values tanked?

And about all those unenforced efforts to create affordable housing options under Minnesota and Met Council policies, especially in suburban areas panicked over a surge in “those people” if affordable housing came to fruition?

And, then, the seemingly unstoppable flood of absentee property acquisition and ownership – and neglect – by landlords unwilling to maintain rental units and spawning the very creation of our inner city slums in what became a cycle of conditions that had institutionalized that neglect so that a century of poverty and exploitation became the norm in too many neighborhoods?

Then, the flood of well-intentioned quest for using homeownership as a tool to combat absentee neglect only to find subprime mortgages flourish and unscrupulous banks and mortgage brokers willing to throw buyers into houses they could ill-afford and into debt that took those properties away again, leaving them to fend in the streets.

And what about all those properties abandoned turning entire blocks into ballparks or prairie?

Did anyone mention community land trusts as a serious way of providing perpetually affordable land use options and affordable housing opportunities? If we did, it was in passing. No dwelling.

Monday morning, we’ll dwell on the subject a good deal longer and learn much more about what on the surface seems like an sensible and underutilized option for cities, states and Metro areas feeling responsible for providing adequate and affordable shelter for their citizens.

We can start with this question: is housing or some form of shelter a right of societal or community membership? If so, why haven’t we explored these options and supplied such shelter for all over the last 200 years around here – longer elsewhere?

What is a land trust, anyway? What and who started this concept? And why does it seem on the surface to make so much sense even for smaller communities within communities?

 

 

Of course, one must qualify and be willing to give up ownership of the land to own the house on it. We’re a land-hungry breed, so this may be tough even for the poorest among us.


Lots of questions to answer.

But we’ll do our best enlighten us all about this concept and its possibilities for all of our communities.TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with at least one Community Land Trust executive and get our questions answered about the potential for– and the limitations of – community land trusts.

GUEST(s):

JEFF WASHBURNE – Executive Director, City of Lakes Community Land Trust, Minneapolis


GREG FINZELL – Executive Director, Rondo Community Land Trust, St. Paul

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author; TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

A craggy mesa once housed Monument No. 2, the hottest, richest, most productive uranium mine in the Navajo homeland, in a remote desert near the Arizona-Utah line. To the families who have dwelled for generations in the spring-fed valley below, the mesa is the wounded center of their world. They and the hundreds of Indians who labored at the mine have been forever changed by the government’s desperate press for more nuclear weapons than any other nation on Earth.

Yellow Dirt is their story.

It is the saga of four generations whose lives have been shaped by uranium.
What happened at Monument No. 2 was repeated in communities across the reservation. Despite warnings from doctors and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners worked unprotected. Long after the uranium boom ended, the neighbors continued to live with contamination. The radioactive “yellow dirt” ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, their bread ovens, their churches and even their garbage dumps.

Few knew what had happened until Judy Pasternak wrote a prizewinning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful Congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage.

In Yellow Dirt, Pasternak provides gripping new details. She introduces the family of Adakai the Gambler, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose fates were intertwined with that of Monument No. 2 and with decisions made without their knowledge in distant capitals and labs. She weaves the personal and the political into a chronicle of betrayal, of willful negligence, and ultimately, of reckoning.

Join us on September 7th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with award winning author Judy Pasternak about her stunning book: Yellow Dirt: An American Story of a Poisoned Land and a People Betrayed. The book examines in depth the effects of uranium mining on the Dine (Navajo) lands, looking closely at what happened to several families who built houses using contaminated materials and drank from water poisoned with uranium. The book is a must read for everyone in Indian Country and those concerned about Indian lands and rights.
Judy Pasternak is an editor with Bloomberg News in Washington and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote about subjects ranging from a band of right-wing extremist bank robbers to the giant black hole at the center of the Milky Way.Yellow Dirt, her first book, made two "Best of 2010" lists: Publisher's Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. The book has also won awards for literary non-fiction, investigative journalism and environmental journalism. She is married, with one son.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO HERE; VIDEO ARCHIVE HERE

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down; First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO Link Below

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down-KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org/Livestream.com

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

When the inevitable development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO HERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota and the Department's Community Outreach Coordinator, Miguel Vargas. 

At the University of Minnesota, Child was recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. She was born on and remains a citizen of the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

Miguel Vargas has been Outreach Coordinator since Fall 2007. He coordinates the Ojibwemodaa Eta! Language Programs and Scholarships, outreaching to K-12 Schools/Youth Programs for visiting opportunities, and moderating the Minnesota Indian Affairs Listserv (MINN-IND).

TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO BELOW; VIDEO UNDER ARCHIVES

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/05/2011

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our Homes; Central Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION



57:04 minutes (52.25 MB)

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

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AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

me_nov_2010.jpgCorine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

 


Corine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

TruthToTell Feb 7: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 02/07/2011

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave. through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - Chair, Central Corridor Business Resource CollaborativeCEO, Bywater Business Solutions

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Discover Central Corridor

February 17 - 8:00-10:00 AM and 6:00-8:00 PM: Public Commentary hearing on Lawsuit Ruling - Brownstone Bldg., 849 University Ave, St. Paul.


58:20 minutes (26.7 MB)