Earth Day

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TruthToTell Monday, April 28- 9AM: MINNESOTA COOPS: 80 years and Start of People-Powered Ownership; TruthToTell Monday, April 21: BEYOND TREEHUGGING: Green Metrics for Earth Day- AUDIO HERE

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 28, 2014

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party’s Cooperative Commonwealth Platform—the boldest vision for a new society every adopted by a successful American political party. What made the platform more than a utopian fantasy was the daily experience of thousands of Minnesotans who were busy building cooperatives across the length and breadth of our state. 

By 1935, Minnesota could boast 2,886 consumer coops with a combined membership of 531,180, the most in the nation. Notable is the Rural Electrical Coop system to deliver electricity to otherwise energy-deprived farm operations.

Today, the cooperative movement remains strong in Minnesota, even if the vision of social transformation isn’t as wide-spread as it was in the 30’s.The most obvious example is theremarkable growth of food coops. Of special note is the expansion of Seward Coopand Mississippi Market to serve lower income and more ethnically diverse neighborhoods in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

But there is more to the cooperative movement than food coops – and not all entirely benign. Massive energy distributor and producer cooperatives have often stepped into the corporate model of governance and less transparent, not to mention questionable huge coop owners.

Land-O-Lakes, CENEX, Twin Cities Milk Producers, whose products may be quality competitive, but not always the most affordable and often have been allowed by state agencies to run roughshod over farmlands with dairy, corn and livestock “cooperative” producers not always operating the public interest environmentally and open governance.

And yet! Credit unions, senior housing, health care, and the hardware purchasing coops that make the small-town independent hardware store possible, are all part of a larger and not always well understood story.

TTT’s TOM O’CONNELL and SIOBHAN KIERANS explore the dynamic growth of coops in Minnesota and do some forward thinking about the potential - and challenges – the state and the movement itself faces the future.

Our guests:

LADONNA REDMOND, Co-Director, Agriculture and Justice (HECUA), Education and Outreach Coordinator, Seward Coop; Student of the African-American cooperative tradition and veteran of the food justice movement.

JILL LIVINGSTON, Capitalization Specialist with Seward Coop, Friendship Store Project organizer.

 


DAVE GUTKNECHT, Editor, Cooperative Grocer; and pioneer in the Twin Cities food cooperative movement. www.cooperativegrocer.coop

JOAN STOCKINGER, development specialist with Cooperative Development Services, and co-author with Dave Gutknecht of a recently released case study of the cooperative local food system. www.cdsus.coop

AND YOU! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 21, 2014

 

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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Celebrate Earth Day with TruthToTell this Monday morning.

Hosts Siobhan Kierans and Tom O’Connell with their guests are Ken Pentel and Kel Heyl. Ken will be talking about the Genuine Progress Indicator and Kel will be talking about a price tag for the 21st century. A price tag that includes Initial Price + Life Cycle Cost + Carbon Footprint.

GUESTS:

KEN PENTEL – Founder of the Ecology Democracy Network; former candidate for governor on the Green Party ticket (1994).

 


KEL HEYL –  Principal, Studio Rebus Incorporated (a design/build contractor).

 

 

 

TruthToTell Monday, April 21- 9AM:BEYOND TREEHUGGING: Green Metrics for Earth Day; April 14- 9AM: COMMUNITY CABLE UNDER SEIGE: Comcast Wants to Strip Your Channels Away - AUDIO PODCAST is UP HERE

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 21, 2014

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Celebrate Earth Day with TruthToTell this Monday morning.

Hosts Siobhan Kierans and Tom O’Connell with their guests are Ken Pentel and Kel Heyl. Ken will be talking about the Genuine Progress Indicator and Kel will be talking about a price tag for the 21st century. A price tag that includes Initial Price + Life Cycle Cost + Carbon Footprint.

GUESTS:

KEN PENTEL – Founder of the Ecology Democracy Network; former candidate for governor on the Green Party ticket (1994).

 


KEL HEYL –  Principal, Studio Rebus Incorporated (a design/build contractor).

 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 14, 2014

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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The so-called cutthroat “Cable Wars” of the early 1980s throughout the Metro Twin Cities as core cities – Minneapolis and St. Paul – along with clusters of groups of suburban cities banded forming joint powers –issued requests from proposals for the essential exclusive franchise to supply municipal huge new systems offering upwards of 60 channels of television programming.

The several cable company competitors for each of these franchise awards begged, hired local power figures and promised the moon to the cities or joint cable commissions – PEGs (public, education and government) channels anywhere from three to seven channels of community and public access programming. Even after all the cable company investment, they actually received a license to print money and to string their cables alongside telephone and power lines throughout the service areas under the jurisdiction.

This came with huge annual funding and capital equipment supplied by the winning cable company – and with at least a guarantee of 15 years of a franchise. With time, channels added to the tiers of cable television and more money came in – and still they want to take back those channels they “gifted” to the cities and communities – except that these cable outfits pass through their costs assessing per-subscriber fee. That tells you how profitable each of those public access channels could be if they brought back into the commercial corral – while the cities and nonprofits and just plain folk would lose their ability to program to supply the meager information and services over the channels. Why must they re-capture those channels?

Now, most cable commissions and cities are in the throes of second and third rounds of re-franchise negotiations – and again they want to reduce the number of channels, stop funding these channels altogether and/or stop supplying the production and transmission equipment to sustain these important community links to the cities throughout the Metro and well beyond.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS talk with some of the Metro cable access organizations ad advocates to highlight the importance and future of community programming channels and nonprofits serving our local cities.

GUESTS:

CORALIE (COR) WILSON, Executive Director, CTV North Suburbs Community Cable Programming, Roseville (based)

CHAD JOHNSTON – Executive Director, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN)

 

 

 

 

MARK HUGHES – CTV Staff & “Disability Viewpoints” – Roseville Channel 15


 

 

TruthToTell Monday, April 21: BEYOND TREEHUGGING: Green Metrics for Earth Day - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7; Streaming @ KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Mon, 04/21/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Celebrate Earth Day with TruthToTell this Monday morning.

Hosts Siobhan Kierans and Tom O’Connell with their guests are Ken Pentel and Kel Heyl. Ken will be talking about the Genuine Progress Indicator and Kel will be talking about a price tag for the 21st century. A price tag that includes Initial Price + Life Cycle Cost + Carbon Footprint.

GUESTS:

KEN PENTEL – Founder of the Ecology Democracy Network; former candidate for governor on the Green Party ticket (1994).

 


KEL HEYL –  Principal, Studio Rebus Incorporated (a design/build contractor).

 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page

Monday, April 29-9AM: FACING RACE: Getting the Conversation Started; April 15: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS III: Re-entry Issues for Ex-Offenders

Many will tout these days, particularly since the election of President Obama, that racism is no longer an issue in the country. But as we've seen how the disparate rates of black male prisoners in this country have created slavery by another name, we must also see how certain daily privileges afforded to the majority groups in power in the United States, media portrayals, and the like, are, in fact, racism by another name.   

The fact is, even if we have succeeded in quashing the completely irrational fears that led to the formation of hate groups such as the Klu Klux Klan and other groups that sought to torture or kill people based on race, we are still dealing with the socio-economic aftermath of what that way of thinking has done to this country and its diverse body of citizens.

Right here in Minnesota, a recent study from the Wilder Foundation found that 37 percent of people in Dakota, Washington, and Ramsey counties still say they get nervous walking into a room of people from other races, if they are the only one of their own race present. One third of these same folks say they strongly or somewhat agree that they would like to get to know people of other races better, but often feel as if they might be ridiculed or shamed if they say the wrong thing. Combine that with the disheartening statistics on education and housing disparities by race in this state and it’s hard to deny that racism is still an issue that needs much attention.  

Who will step up to help bridge the cultural and institutional divide that racial tensions have spawned? How exactly do you confront racism in a way that is both implicating and welcoming? These are all goals of the Facing Race ‘We’re all in this together’ Initiative. Hosts, Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O'Connell will discuss these issues of racism that are subtly embedded in our societal structure today as we talk about their upcoming Facing Race Ambassador Awards ceremony, happening the evening after our broadcast, and what these folks are doing to shed light on the privileges and the fears that continue to perpetuate racism in this country.  

TTT’s MICHELLE ALIMORADI and TOM O’CONNELL talk with key figures in this year’s Awards event. 

On-air guests: 

JOSIE JOHNSON- former University of Minnesota Regent; retired University of Minnesota Associate Vice President for Minority Student Affairs; Founder, UofM Office of Diversity & Equity, and Honoree - Josie R. Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award; Principal, Josie Robinson Johnson & Associates Consulting, and recipient of a 2013 Facing Race Amabassador Award.

 


CORINTH MATERA- Teacher, South High School, Minneapolis. Corinth was nominated for a Facing Race Ambassador Award for her work in creating an education unit addressing the U.S. Dakota War of 1862.  Ms. Matera has been a leader in promoting this education unit, and it has reached over 600 students in the past three years.

 

DR MANUEL PASTOR- Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Southern California; His most recent book, published in 2010,  is Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future. Keynote speaker at this year’s Facing Race Awards Ceremony. 


No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 22, 2013

Ed. NOTE: This week, TruthToTell looks at Earth Day as an entrepreneurial and responsible opportunity. Our colleague and engineer, Kel Heyl, himself a green contractor, offered to help assemble this program and offers, too, this reflection on the Day’s creation and this year’s TTT approach to celebrating this now iconic annual reminder of our human responsibility to protect the planet in all ways possible – and, ironically, as businesses new and adapted:

Making Cents of Earth Day

It’s the summer of 1969. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, already considered a champion of the protecting the natural world, had visited an oil spill site in Santa Barbara, California. On his return flight he was reading an article about various “teach-ins” on college campuses dealing with Vietnam, when…“It popped into my head. That’s it! Why not have an environmental teach-in and get everyone involved?”

Senator Nelson returned to Washington and quickly formed a non-profit – Environmental Teach-In, Inc. – recruiting a few Republicans and conservationists to help with the project. On September 20, 1969 he went public with his mission from Seattle:

“I am convinced that the same concern the youth of this nation took in changing this nation’s priorities on the war in Vietnam and on civil rights can be shown for the problems of the environment. Young people can take the leadership away from the indifferent, venal men who are concerned with progress and profit for the sake of progress and profit alone…”

After considering a number of names like Environment Day and Ecology Day, they settled on the appellation, “Earth Day.” Nelson chose the date to maximize participation on college campuses. The week of April 19–25 did not fall during exams or spring break and did not conflict with Easter or Passover. It was late enough to ensure good weather. During the middle of the week there would be more students in class and no competition from other events – so Wednesday, April 22, 1970 was anointed as the target day. When critics later pointed out it was Lenin’s birthday, Nelson replied that it was also the birthday of both St. Francis of Assisi, the nature saint, and his own Aunt Tillie.

The above was excerpted from this article. In September,1995, Sen. Nelson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In keeping with the spirit of the times, much of the work flowing from those first Earth Days were seeking top-down large-scale Federal legislation and regulation.

What makes progressive change so difficult now is that a sizeable percentage of the American people are inserting their heads into deep holes they purchase from entities whose short-term bottom lines are enhanced by maintaining unsustainable patterns of consumption. Just regulating industry will not yield a viable future. Today, we look at small-scale day-to-day successes with special attention directed to increasingly sophisticated tools that allow us to make sustainable decisions and how an NGO is becoming a de facto global standard.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead our guests through their work on three different points along the sustainability continuum. Each runs a businesses which helps clients make better informed decisions – decisions which make their futures more sustainable without further disrupting the present.

GUESTS:

CINDY OJCZYK – Principal of Simply Green Design and A More Beautiful Home.

RAMY SALIM  –  OwnerSunny Day Earth SolutionsCompleted the first City issued permitted straw bale building in over a decade 

DALE FORSBERG – President of Watson-Forsberg Contracting; specialist in LEED*

*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – a point based rating system used to answer the questions: How green is this design or building. It was created by theUnited States Green Building Council.

 

TruthToTell, Monday, April 22-9AM: EARTH DAY 2013: A Wise Entrepreneurial Approach; TruthToTell, April 15: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS III: Re-entry Issues for Ex-Offenders (AUDIO & VIDEO)

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 22, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ed. NOTE: This week, TruthToTell looks at Earth Day as an entrepreneurial and responsible opportunity. Our colleague and engineer, Kel Heyl, himself a green contractor, offered to help assemble this program and offers, too, this reflection on the Day’s creation and this year’s TTT approach to celebrating this now iconic annual reminder of our human responsibility to protect the planet in all ways possible – and, ironically, as businesses new and adapted:

Making Cents of Earth Day

It’s the summer of 1969. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, already considered a champion of the protecting the natural world, had visited an oil spill site in Santa Barbara, California. On his return flight he was reading an article about various “teach-ins” on college campuses dealing with Vietnam, when…“It popped into my head. That’s it! Why not have an environmental teach-in and get everyone involved?”

Senator Nelson returned to Washington and quickly formed a non-profit – Environmental Teach-In, Inc. – recruiting a few Republicans and conservationists to help with the project. On September 20, 1969 he went public with his mission from Seattle:

“I am convinced that the same concern the youth of this nation took in changing this nation’s priorities on the war in Vietnam and on civil rights can be shown for the problems of the environment. Young people can take the leadership away from the indifferent, venal men who are concerned with progress and profit for the sake of progress and profit alone…”

After considering a number of names like Environment Day and Ecology Day, they settled on the appellation, “Earth Day.” Nelson chose the date to maximize participation on college campuses. The week of April 19–25 did not fall during exams or spring break and did not conflict with Easter or Passover. It was late enough to ensure good weather. During the middle of the week there would be more students in class and no competition from other events – so Wednesday, April 22, 1970 was anointed as the target day. When critics later pointed out it was Lenin’s birthday, Nelson replied that it was also the birthday of bothSt. Francis of Assisi, the nature saint, and his own Aunt Tillie.

The above was excerpted from this article. In September,1995, Sen. Nelson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In keeping with the spirit of the times, much of the work flowing from those first Earth Days were seeking top-down large-scale Federal legislation and regulation.

What makes progressive change so difficult now is that a sizeable percentage of the American people are inserting their heads into deep holes they purchase from entities whose short-term bottom lines are enhanced by maintaining unsustainable patterns of consumption. Just regulating industry will not yield a viable future. Today, we look at small-scale day-to-day successes with special attention directed to increasingly sophisticated tools that allow us to make sustainable decisions and how an NGO is becoming a de facto global standard.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead our guests through their work on three different points along the sustainability continuum. Each runs a businesses which helps clients make better informed decisions – decisions which make their futures more sustainable without further disrupting the present.

GUESTS:

CINDY OJCZYK – Principal of Simply Green Design and A More Beautiful Home.

RAMY SALIM  –  OwnerSunny Day Earth SolutionsCompleted the first City issued permitted straw bale building in over a decade 

DALE FORSBERG – President of Watson-Forsberg Contracting; specialist in LEED*

*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – a point based rating system used to answer the questions: How green is this design or building. It was created by the United States Green Building Council.

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MOST RECENT SHOW


An explosion of books, televisions show, seminars and public policy proposals in the last two or three years has raised the curtain on some of this country’s most shameful corrections practices, 
most of them having been imposed in peaks and valleys since the official, if not the de facto demise of Jim Crow across the states that dared to thumb their noses at the Constitution and its 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the laws once again stating the obvious – that all men – and women – are created equal in nature and under the law.

But Jim Crow never really died. It just stuck itself into the criminal justice and correction systems of every state and the Federal government, thanks to paranoid and expedient political fears over some notion that law and order was out of control – a perception with no solid evidence. In addition to the amazingly disproportionate ratio of men of color serving time in our penitentiaries, their wildly disparate treatment in the streets and criminal justice system has been part of an even larger packing of the jails and prisons in the last few decades.

So. What happens in a country with such injustice as we’ve seen in the economy, job losses and permanent unemployment? What happens when poverty entrenches itself in our core cities and deep rural settings? What happens when it becomes obvious to young men and women who’ve been raised in abusive family settings, without adequate nutrition to feed their hungry stomachs and their hungry minds, without decent educational settings and successful learning? Anger, frustration, despair, desperation and, very often, severe mental illness sometimes driving all of it in the face of being blamed and sometimes beaten for their just being there. These are the seeds and the soil for growing discontent, drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, sometimes damned serious crime. What follows is capture, prosecution, conviction and hard time, sometimes lots of it. But sometimes, if conditions are right, a second chance might come along with a sentence of probation, even for felonies.

Still, in the heat of the lock-‘em-up-and-throw-away-the-key punishment fervor of the judgmental post-World War II lingering of the Great Depression, longer and longer sentences, more disparity in the treatment of offenders, especially by race and poverty levels, many politicians decided that no crime should ever stop going unpunished, and instituted all manner of laws insisting that, like Inspector Jauvert from Les Miserables: no matter the crime, once a crook, always a crook, and, like Jauvert’s lifetime pursuit of the offender Jean Valjean, we often see police and corrections systems pursuing ex-offenders all but forever. Landlords refuse to rent, banks refuse to finance, employers refuse to hire, and, worst of all, governments refuse to restore voting rights – all but guaranteeing a higher recidivism rate – or return to prison – of those freed from prison. What has never left us, is the racism.

All of this AFTER, mind you, the felons or offenders have actually completed their sentences.

In recent years, many advocates, especially those in the landmark Minnesota-based Second Chance Coalition, have stepped to the plate to change the climate of post-incarceration or imprisonment to one of restoration. Restoration of the right to a job,  to live somewhere affordable, and, finally, to vote again. In other words – a return to humanity and citizenship.

It’s been a long slog for these advocates, some working to transition offenders back into the outside world, some to find them jobs and housing, and still others who haunt those halls of the Capitol trying to change the ways laws deal with the restoration of what many consider to be human and/or civil rights.

Only education, involvement and the dropping of our prejudices about those who have paid their debts can we begin to see the fruits of our humanity.

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 This program was recorded at Headquarters of Community Partner, Goodwill/Easter Seals. Community Partner St. Paul Neighborhood Network’s cameras are rolling and recording this show for airing tonight at 8:00 and beyond on both St. Paul’s cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. And we will distribute this program widely throughout the Metro and Minnesota wherever we can.

We thank the staff of Goodwill/Easter Seals, especially Deanna Gulliford and Lisa Ritter, for their hospitality and recruiting much of the audience. The program began with a short video - which you can watch here.

TTT'S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI host Part Three of our Community Connections series, funded by a grant from the Bush Foundation. 

GUESTS/Panelists:

SARAH CATHERINE WALKER – former Chief Operating Officer of 180 Degrees; Co-founding Co-chair of the Second Chance Coalition

STATE SEN. DAVE THOMPSON (R-Lakeville) – Assistant Minority Leader; Ranking Minority Member of the Tax Reform Division of the Senate Taxes Committee

 


MARK HAASE – Vice President for Projects and Operations at Council on Crime & Justice; Co-chair, Second Chance Coalition

ROB STEWART – University of Minnesota Doctoral Student in Sociology; Former Felon

TruthToTell, Monday, April 22-9AM: EARTH DAY 2013: A Wise Entrepreneurial Approach - AUDIO HERE

On-air date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Ed. NOTE: This week, TruthToTell looks at Earth Day as an entrepreneurial and responsible opportunity. Our colleague and engineer, Kel Heyl, himself a green contractor, offered to help assemble this program and offers, too, this reflection on the Day’s creation and this year’s TTT approach to celebrating this now iconic annual reminder of our human responsibility to protect the planet in all ways possible – and, ironically, as businesses new and adapted:

Making Cents of Earth Day

It’s the summer of 1969. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, already considered a champion of the protecting the natural world, had visited an oil spill site in Santa Barbara, California. On his return flight he was reading an article about various “teach-ins” on college campuses dealing with Vietnam, when…“It popped into my head. That’s it! Why not have an environmental teach-in and get everyone involved?”

Senator Nelson returned to Washington and quickly formed a non-profit – Environmental Teach-In, Inc. – recruiting a few Republicans and conservationists to help with the project. On September 20, 1969 he went public with his mission from Seattle:

“I am convinced that the same concern the youth of this nation took in changing this nation’s priorities on the war in Vietnam and on civil rights can be shown for the problems of the environment. Young people can take the leadership away from the indifferent, venal men who are concerned with progress and profit for the sake of progress and profit alone…”

After considering a number of names like Environment Day and Ecology Day, they settled on the appellation, “Earth Day.” Nelson chose the date to maximize participation on college campuses. The week of April 19–25 did not fall during exams or spring break and did not conflict with Easter or Passover. It was late enough to ensure good weather. During the middle of the week there would be more students in class and no competition from other events – so Wednesday, April 22, 1970 was anointed as the target day. When critics later pointed out it was Lenin’s birthday, Nelson replied that it was also the birthday of both St. Francis of Assisi, the nature saint, and his own Aunt Tillie.

The above was excerpted from this article. In September,1995, Sen. Nelson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In keeping with the spirit of the times, much of the work flowing from those first Earth Days were seeking top-down large-scale Federal legislation and regulation.

What makes progressive change so difficult now is that a sizeable percentage of the American people are inserting their heads into deep holes they purchase from entities whose short-term bottom lines are enhanced by maintaining unsustainable patterns of consumption. Just regulating industry will not yield a viable future. Today, we look at small-scale day-to-day successes with special attention directed to increasingly sophisticated tools that allow us to make sustainable decisions and how an NGO is becoming a de facto global standard.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead our guests through their work on three different points along the sustainability continuum. Each runs a businesses which helps clients make better informed decisions – decisions which make their futures more sustainable without further disrupting the present.

GUESTS:

CINDY OJCZYK – Principal of Simply Green Design and A More Beautiful Home.

RAMY SALIM  –  Owner, Sunny Day Earth Solutions; Completed the first City issued permitted straw bale building in over a decade

DALE FORSBERG – President of Watson-Forsberg Contracting; specialist in LEED*

*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – a point based rating system used to answer the questions: How green is this design or building. It was created by the United States Green Building Council.

TruthToTell Monday, April 16-9AM: EARTH DAY AND JUSTICE: Challenges Bloom; TruthToTell Monday, April 9: GMOs and OUR FOOD: What’s Safe, What Ain’t?

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’sFacebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

TruthToTell Monday, April 16-9AM: EARTH DAY AND JUSTICE: Challenges Bloom - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

 

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Earth Day is upon us again.

Most previous Earth Days have attempted – often quite successfully – to raise awareness of our individual responsibility to protect the environment, to protect the planet from global warming and other climate change issues, reducing the carbon in our lives – our air and water and atmosphere.

We’ve seen efforts at encouraging energy audits of our homes and businesses toward conserving energy and work us away from fossil fuel consumption and on to use of solar and wind alternatives on massive and neighborhood scales.

We’ve seen local community groups zero in on urban and community gardening as another way of achieving organic dominance over processed farming and foods.

What we have likely not spent enough time on is advocating for, nay, demanding, polluting corporations and governments to stop fouling the air and water in the most poverty-stricken of our neighborhoods and communities, invariably dominated by families and businesses of color. That’s the American Way – and it has ever been thus. It has and always be a matter of environmental justice.

Dating to the beginnings of the industrial revolution – the mid-19th Century – our cities’ and rural manufacturing might and energy production have been placed where they knew you’d find the least political power and organized resistance to the foul air and water created by their operations. This, of course, resulted in wide disparity in the health of families raised and reproduced in the shadow of those facilities pouring hundreds of killing chemicals into the essential elements of life: the air our children breathe and the water they need to survive and lead healthy lives.

Any wonder why there’s been a 600-700% increase in asthma rates among children over the last 30 years and an exacerbating rate of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among older people, who, for several generations were already on their way by smoking those oversold cigarettes. (Check out the maps - the industrial northeast has the highest rates of asthma.)

But these were often, nevertheless, the job-producers in many towns and cities. So, just as the mining initiatives and waste-burning facilities of today and yesterday hold the promise of employment, so did they more assuredly promise the highest of risks to the health of their workers and those community members and politicians who believed themselves tied to their success. They still do.

This year for Earth Day, we take on the subject of environmental justice and the manner in which official state, county and municipal government continue to ignore the effects of their environmentally dangerous decisions on their less-powerful constituents’ health and wellbeing and the will they lack to curtail the pollution destroying all of living matter in all of our rural and urban areas – in Minneapolis, currently, the Hennepin County garbage burner (HERC) and Northern Metals Recycling. We look, too, at the complicity of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) in either ignoring or actually aiding the permitting of such facilities to continue their deposits of dangerous chemicals into the air and/or waters of our urban and rural living venues.

Still, organizations concerned with our sustainability and safety are making some strides toward resolution at the community level as well as policy advocacy in lawmaking and rulemaking circles locally and statewide. An event celebrating the day and those efforts will be held on Earth Day itself, April 21st(22nd in some places), at the Urban League in North Minneapolis, Its organizers and speakers join us Monday morning.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with several advocates taking our elected representatives and their corporate collaborators to task for the damage that never seems to end for those living in and around the worst of them.

GUESTS:

KAREN MONAHAN – Environmental Justice Community Organizer, Sierra Club North Star Chapter

LOUIS ALEMAYEHU – Environmental Justice Advocates of Minnesota (EJAM) officer; Board member, North American Water Office; Writer, educator, activist, poet, father, grandfather of African and Native American heritage

SAM GRANT – Principal, Ujima Consulting and Movement Center for Deep Democracy; Founder and consultant with Full Circle Community Institute and Afro Eco

INVITED:  Congressman KEITH ELLISON

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HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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The complexity of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and food literally boggle the mind.The biochemistry involved in plant and animal genomics and transgenics – or the business of modifying the genes of any species – has turned ugly with growing resistance to the toying around with the genetic makeup of our crops and livestock and the rabid refusal of the genetic modifiers like Monsanto Chemical Company to label their foods – fighting with millions in lobbyist money all efforts by food safety experts, organic consumer advocates and respected groups like the Union of Concerned Scientists to pass state or federal legislation requiring the labeling of genetically modified foods.

That would seem a simple and responsible step toward gaining the confidence of consumers and such. Of course, no such foods could ever again be considered organic.

But what is the big deal?

Well of course, money for the inventers and sellers of chemicals that Monsanto and others peddle modified seeds to millions of farmers who see these additives as boosting yields and profits. But what is there to hide from a public that deserves to know what the hell they’re eating?

If they won’t say, then it can’t be good. Or can it? Well, we don’t know, do we?

The government seems clearly on the side of the modifiers. Its websites are loaded with terms that any wordsmith like this writer would see as advocacy for one point of view versus another – and the FDA’s and the USDA’s attempts at explanations are peppered with encouragement for accepting the benefits of genetic modification – both in pooh-poohing the safety issues (the evidence is never conclusive, is it, as to the harm GM foods might be causing) or in the dangers to the environment, animals and plants from all this playing around with biology.

But, woe to the organic farmer who tries to keep genetically modified seeds from blowing onto his property. If anything he grows shows signs of patented genes designed by Monsanto – never mind that nature did the stealing – the chemical company will sue. Hell, Monsanto has already scared off legislation in some states by threatening to sue of labeling requirements are passed.

This is the stuff of Orwellian tales – the willingness of a chemical firm to take some poor schlub to court over the infiltration of some other guys modified seeds into the crops next door even when he never wanted them in the first place – and getting the court to actually back the crushing by big brother corporations over this “mistake.”

The bigger deal is the total lack of control over the ethical use of GMOs by the public, especially the regulatory agencies and an apparent willingness to spend millions keeping it that way.Some international scientists are meting as we speak but not in the United States. No. These are mostly Asian and European scientists gathering in hand-wringing sessions and submitting scientific analyses about the need for keeping a keen eye on the ethics and biology of all this modifying of  plants and animals – even if the idea is to make them resistant to diseases and insects.

You wouldn’t believe the depth of research and discussion taking place over the entire field.

This is why this should be a very short hour given the amount of information available and the arguments flying back and forth over the rampant use of this chemical technology and the complete lack of understanding by an unwary public as to the short- and long-term ramifications of consuming the modified meats and vegetables so prevalent on our local food shelves these days.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query three men immersed in this field and representing diverse perspectives on the farming and consumption of genetically modified organisms and foods and the impact of all of this on the ecology and legality of critical pollination.

GUESTS:

 DR. DAVID ANDOW – Entomologist; Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Insect Ecology, University of Minnesota; Coordinator of the International Project on GMO Environmental Risk Assessment Methodologies (GMO ERA Project)

 GEORGE BOODY – Executive Director, Land Stewardship Project (LSP); MS in Horticulture and Human Nutrition; BS in Biology, University of Minnesota

 RONNIE CUMMINS – Executive Director, Organic Consumers Association; former director, Jeremy Rifkin's Beyond Beef Campaign & Pure Food Campaign; author of books on Central American culture; co-author, Genetically-Engineered Foods: A Self-Defense Guide for Consumers

READ MORE ABOUT GMO’s HERE:

 Genetically Modified Food - GM Foods List and Information

Millions Against Monsanto Minnesota

Agriculture Network Information Center (AgNIC)

U.S. Human Genome Project

TruthToTell April 16: EARTH DAY AND JUSTICE: Challenges Bloom - AUDIO PODCAST BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 04/16/2012

 

 

 

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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Earth Day is upon us again.

Most previous Earth Days have attempted – often quite successfully – to raise awareness of our individual responsibility to protect the environment, to protect the planet from global warming and other climate change issues, reducing the carbon in our lives – our air and water and atmosphere.

We’ve seen efforts at encouraging energy audits of our homes and businesses toward conserving energy and work us away from fossil fuel consumption and on to use of solar and wind alternatives on massive and neighborhood scales.

We’ve seen local community groups zero in on urban and community gardening as another way of achieving organic dominance over processed farming and foods.

What we have likely not spent enough time on is advocating for, nay, demanding, polluting corporations and governments to stop fouling the air and water in the most poverty-stricken of our neighborhoods and communities, invariably dominated by families and businesses of color. That’s the American Way – and it has ever been thus. It has and always be a matter of environmental justice.

Dating to the beginnings of the industrial revolution – the mid-19th Century – our cities’ and rural manufacturing might and energy production have been placed where they knew you’d find the least political power and organized resistance to the foul air and water created by their operations. This, of course, resulted in wide disparity in the health of families raised and reproduced in the shadow of those facilities pouring hundreds of killing chemicals into the essential elements of life: the air our children breathe and the water they need to survive and lead healthy lives.

Any wonder why there’s been a 600-700% increase in asthma rates among children over the last 30 years and an exacerbating rate of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among older people, who, for several generations were already on their way by smoking those oversold cigarettes. (Check out the maps - the industrial northeast has the highest rates of asthma.)

But these were often, nevertheless, the job-producers in many towns and cities. So, just as the mining initiatives and waste-burning facilities of today and yesterday hold the promise of employment, so did they more assuredly promise the highest of risks to the health of their workers and those community members and politicians who believed themselves tied to their success. They still do.

This year for Earth Day, we take on the subject of environmental justice and the manner in which official state, county and municipal government continue to ignore the effects of their environmentally dangerous decisions on their less-powerful constituents’ health and wellbeing and the will they lack to curtail the pollution destroying all of living matter in all of our rural and urban areas – in Minneapolis, currently, the Hennepin County garbage burner (HERC) and Northern Metals Recycling. We look, too, at the complicity of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) in either ignoring or actually aiding the permitting of such facilities to continue their deposits of dangerous chemicals into the air and/or waters of our urban and rural living venues.

Still, organizations concerned with our sustainability and safety are making some strides toward resolution at the community level as well as policy advocacy in lawmaking and rulemaking circles locally and statewide. An event celebrating the day and those efforts will be held on Earth Day itself, April 21st(22nd in some places), at the Urban League in North Minneapolis, Its organizers and speakers join us Monday morning.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with several advocates taking our elected representatives and their corporate collaborators to task for the damage that never seems to end for those living in and around the worst of them.

GUESTS:

KAREN MONAHAN – Environmental Justice Community Organizer, Sierra Club North Star Chapter

LOUIS ALEMAYEHUEnvironmental Justice Advocates of Minnesota (EJAM) officer; Board member, North American Water Office; Writer, educator, activist, poet, father, grandfather of African and Native American heritage

SAM GRANT – Principal, Ujima Consulting and Movement Center for Deep Democracy; Founder and consultant with Full Circle Community Institute and Afro Eco


56:35 minutes (51.81 MB)