First Person

First Person Radio: March 30: LEADERS IN NATIVE AMERICAN PHILANTHROPY - AUDIO is UP BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 03/30/2011

IT'S SPRING MEMBERSHIP DRIVE TIME ON KFAI. REMEMBER TO CALL IN AND CONTRIBUTE YOUR FAIR SHARE FOR THE KFAI PROGRAMS YOU HEAR EACH WEEK ON THIS COMMUNITY-BASED STATION. 612-375-9030.

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This week’s three guests are part of Native Americans in Philanthropy:

Carly Hare is Executive Director Native Americans in Philanthropy after having been a voting member for five years, serving on the institute planning committee for three years, and on the NAP Board of Directors for a year. Carly most recently held the position of the Director of Development for the Native American Rights Fund.

Yohantus Elaine Stephens is the Director of Development for Native Americans in Philanthropy. She began her philanthropy career as a clerical volunteer for the March of Dimes. At the March of Dimes, she used her creative relationship-building skills to foster relationships with key corporate donors to support high-profile events such as the Tribute Salute Dinner honoring producers Ron Howard and Brian Grazer and Celebrity Ski Bum Tournament.

Ron Rowell (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma/Kaskaskia/Chickasaw) is CEO of the Common Counsel Foundation. He earned his master¹s degree in public health from the University of California at Berkeley. His professional career has included health planning, refugee resettlement, economic development with American Indian tribes, and coordinating the HIV antibody-testing program at the San Francisco Department of Public Health. He founded the National Native American AIDS Prevention Center in 1987 with a group of Native health activists and became its first executive director in late 1988 where he served until August of 2000

FPR's RICHARD LaFORTUNE with Andy Driscoll interviews this week's guests.


37:37 minutes (17.22 MB)

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

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AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

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AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

me_nov_2010.jpgCorine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

 


Corine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

On-air date: 
Wed, 02/02/2011

CHANGE: Tiokasin Ghosthorse ran into the Chicago storm and will join FPR another day.

Corine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


53:26 minutes (24.46 MB)

TTT Dec 20: OPEN ACCESS CONNECTIONS to the Homeless; COMING DEC 27: 9-11 FALLOUT: Haunting Pain for Minnesotans; FirstPersonRadio Dec 15: WALTER ECHO-HAWK, Lawyer, Judge, Author

TruthToTell Dec 20: OPEN ACCESS CONNECTIONS: Putting Homeless with Work and Housing – KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org

THIS WEEK: OPEN ACCESS CONNECTIONS FOR THE HOMELESS

NEXT WEEK: 9-11 TRUTH SQUADS and GROUND ZERO RESPONDERS’ SICKNESSES AND DEATHS

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What most of us see of homelessness in the Twin Cities are men and women and some children layered in their remaining clothes, perhaps gathering in the courtyard at Dorothy Day Center or waiting for a slot at a St. Stephens shelter or something like it. What almost all of them are looking for, of course, besides a meal or place to stay – is a job and permanent housing. But they have no telephone, and certainly no way of leaving a number for a potential employer or landlord to call.

Almost invisible in this morass is a small nonprofit serving as a communications clearing house and message center for homeless men and women. Now called Open Access Connections, the former Twin Cities Community Voice Mail changed its name and expanded its reach beyond the Cities and is making technology work to connect those experiencing homelessness with people and opportunities to cut all of that short and to find housing and jobs a lot sooner than they could otherwise. It all sounds fairly simple; it’s anything but.

This week, TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with organizers, agencies and participants in this extraordinary effort to make homelessness go away and allow self-sufficiency to take over through technology.

GUESTS:

MARCY SHAPIRO– Co-Founder and Executive Director, Open Access Connections (OAC)

ED PETSCHE – OAC Community Organizer and Outreach Specialist

TED DENNIS – Open Access Board member; community organizer and advocate for people living in poverty and having experienced homelessness; Chair, Voices for Change; and has experienced homelessness

BRIAN SULLIVAN – Open Access Board member; recently homeless and former user of voice mail; member of Homeless Against Homelessness

LIZ KUOPPALA – Executive Director, Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless

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COMING! TruthToTell 9:00AM-Dec 27: 9-11 FALLOUT: Haunting Pain for Minnesotans – KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org

NEXT WEEK - evidence-based truths about 9-11 from architects and engineers, intelligence scholars, a victim's relative, a suffering Ground Zero responder. You may not like this or want to believe it, but the evidence is compelling that something's been amiss about this whole episode, made more likely by the very real evidence of this government's lying and its persistent denial of services and recompense, not only for first responders, but all responders for days, weeks, months and years thereafter, all working at Ground Zero and all either sick or dying or dead. Of the some 10,000 men and women who saw service in the toxic cocktail that comprised the air in and around the devastation, nearly 1,000 have died at the hands of those materials, inhaled or ingested, which destroyed one or many parts of their bodily functions. Others will soon follow.

At least a dozen professional organizations including those of pilots, physicists, architects, engineers and medical personnel have detailed that evidence in such a way as to make it difficult to buy the media-advanced US government claims that the damage done by planes and the collapse of three buildings triggered by those aircraft were physically possible under the most imaginative conditions.

TTT's ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several investigators and victims of this event.

GUESTS:

• CATHERINE STATZ - Sister of 9-11 Victim

• LUCIE FERRELL - Healthcare worker at Ground Zero now suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases.

• RUBEN ROSARIO - Columnist, St. Paul Pioneer Press - Author of article on Lucie Ferrell

• RUSSELL FELT – Engineer Researcher of 9-11

• PROF. MICHAEL ANDREGG - University of St. Thomas; 9-11 Intelligence Scholar

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First Person Radio–Dec 15: WALTER ECHO-HAWK: In The Courts of the Conqueror - AUDIO HERE

We talk with Walter Echo-Hawk about his illustrious career on behalf of American Indian people. And we discuss his newest book: In the Courts of the Conqueror: The Ten Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided

Walter Echo-Hawk wears 4 hats:

(1) Justice, Supreme Court of the Pawnee Nation;

(2) Chairman, Board of Directors, Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, a brand new national and permanently endowed foundation to support Native art and culture;

(3) Of CounselCrowe & Dunlevy, Oklahoma’s oldest and largest law firm; and

(4) Adjunct Professor, Tulsa University School of Law (2010). From 1973-2008, he was a staff attorney of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), where he represented Indian Tribes, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians on significant legal issues during the modern era of federal Indian law. Among his many awards are:

Governor’s Commendation (2010), Governor Brad Henry, for professional contributions on behalf of indigenous cultures throughout the nation, Judge Sarah Hughes Civil Liberties AwardFederal Bar Association (2009); Distinguished Native American Alumni, Oklahoma State University (2009); Martin Luther King Peace Award, Metropolitan College, Denver (1998); Spirit of Excellence Award, American Bar Association (1995); Civil Liberties Award, ACLU of Oregon (1991). 

TTT Mon, Nov 15 @9AM: RELIGION IN TWIN CITIES: Dividing or Uniting?; FirstPersonRadio: Tretter Collection; TTT Nov 7: Home Birthing

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: CALL 612-341-0980

Back on September 22nd, yet another attack in the Catholic Church’s war against gay marriage was launched, spending $1 million for the Knights of Columbus to produce and send 400,000 DVDs to Catholics throughout the realm of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. The DVD admonishes all Catholics – and sympathizers – to lobby the coming Legislature for a state Constitutional Amendment to essentially ban gay marriage by defining marriage as a union only of one man and one woman. That these weren’t out less than six weeks before the General Election couldn’t have been an accident, but their effect on the election remains to be tabulated, if ever. We know what happened to the DFL majorities in the House and Senate.

One response was the formation of a group calling itself ReturnTheDVDs, urging all DVD recipients to either refuse delivery or send back the DVD in protest. Another saw the Basilica of St. Mary’s artist-in-residence, Lucinda Naylor, deciding to gather up as many of the DVDs from volunteer donors to create a sculpture out of them. She painted the hundreds she received blue and turned them into a piece of interlocking discs called “The Wave.” Yet another was a scathing essay written by Father Mike Tegeder, pastor of St. Edward’s Catholic Church in Bloomington and another by the Rev. Clifford Robinson, St. Luke's Episcopal Church of Minneapolis. (Remember, elevation of the first openly gay bishop in the Episcopalian Church, V. Gene Robinson, sparked a schism among Anglicans everywhere, and Robinson is resigning or retiring in 2013 in part because persistent death threats have rocked his marriage.)

At about the same time this was happening locally, a new book co-written by author, Robert Putnam of Bowling Alone fame was published. CalledAmerican Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, the book attempts to explain the dichotomy between America’s penchant for religion and our concomitant tolerance for religions other than our own.

Andy Driscoll interviewed Robert Putnam for this show and we were to be graced with participation in this week’s conversation by his co-author, David Campbell. We’ll hear excerpts from that interview, but, sadly and inexplicably, Dr. Campbell canceled out this past week.

However, TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN welcome this week’s guests for a lively conversation about the role religion plays in uniting or dividing us, with an emphasis on religion’s, especially the Catholic and Episcopalian faiths’ responses to the reality of same-sex relationships, no longer as closeted and demanding a place not only in society but in the congregations of their choice. We’ll also discuss the roles churches should or should not play in mixing their spiritual missions with the more corporal business of secular politics. Join us and join in the discussion: Call 612-341-0980 and be a part of TruthToTell – always.

REV. LEEANNE WATKINS - Rector, St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Saint Paul

REV. MICHAEL TEGEDER - Pastor, St. Edward's Catholic Church, Bloomington, MN

LUCINDA NAYLOR – Former Artist-in-Residence at Basilica of St. Mary, Creator of "The Wave" DVD Sculpture

CANCELLED: DAVID CAMPBELL - Co-Author, AMERICAN GRACE: How Religion Unites Us and Divides Us 

The Archdiocese of St. Paul & Minneapolis (Dennis McGrath) stated that they do not participate in such discussions, unless there's a theological conference or something of similar gravity involved.

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Wednesday, November 17, 2010
 

Tretter collection a treasure trove for GLBT studies

After decades of gathering materials, Jean-Nickolaus Tretter has donated his considerable collection to the University's Special Collections and Rare Books library. One of the largest private collections of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) materials in the world, Tretter's collection is being installed at Andersen Library.

Jean-Nickolaus Tretter (left) with Timothy Johnson, U libraries curator. Photo by Amy Marie Amundson

Jean-Nickolaus Tretter (left) with Timothy Johnson, U libraries curator. Photo by Amy Marie Amundson

The Jean-Nickolaus Tretter Collection in GLBT Studies contains over 10,000 items such as personal papers and first-edition books. It includes items as ancient as Egyptian fertility objects, as campy as gay and lesbian pulp novels from the 1950s, as regional as Minnesota starolite orthorhombic prisms (known as “fairy stones"), and as historically important as a book pulled from the burning of the Hirschfeld library in Berlin in 1933.

“It is very gratifying to realize that now anyone interested in GLBT Studies or research will have to seriously consider the University of Minnesota as the place to go,” said Tretter. “No longer will those interested in researching our communities and cultures be restricted to the coastal universities to do work in this field.”

Linnea Stenson, program director of the Schochet Center for GLBT Studies, concurs. “The Tretter Collection, in all its depth and breadth, provides the very best kind of resource to accomplish valuable interdisciplinary work: a treasure trove of primary sources,” says Stenson. “It is foundational to the work the Schochet Center for GLBT Studies has set about doing.

Guest: JEAN-NICKOLAUS TRETTER – GLBT ARCHIVIST

 

Monday, November 15, 2010

After years of "professionalization" and “medicalization” of the entire parenting process from conception through delivery, many families, say, women, are opting for a simpler method, in the home with a successor to the old days of midwifery, the modern, professional midwife, or licensed midwife, or doula.

The medical profession appears pretty unhappy over this turn of events and is arguing against home birthing for all the reasons medical intervention was introduced to begin with decades ago: it’s essentially the only really safe way to deliver and, in that setting, all the options for emergency deliveries are close at hand.

TruthToTell’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN explore with advocates from all sides of this controversy, much of which has landed in the halls of state capitols and in the medical journals, especially those of the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the AMA. But midwives and home birthing advocates have successfully pushed for laws allowing the home birthing of children and still have access to and coverage for emergency medical procedures and pediatric follow-up care for infants.LISTEN BELOW for this fascinating discussion.

GUESTS:

KATHERINE PROWN, PhD – The Big Push for Midwives

KIM GARRETT – Dearborn Midwifery; Certified Professional Midwife, Licensed Midwife

SUNDEE KUECHLE - Home Birth Mother

JENNIFER PEOPLES, MD, OB/GYN (Called in voluntarily)

 

 

TruthToTell Mon 11/1 @9AM: COLLEGE ATTAINMENT: A Plan for Inclusion?; Also: Podcasts for First Person Radio 10/27 and TruthToTell on Redistricting 10/25

TruthToTell Mon, Nov 1 @9AM: COLLEGE ATTAINMENT: A Plan for Inclusion? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org

How in heaven’s name can Minnesota possibly achieve a 75% rate of  high-schoolers attending college by 2020 when the very survival of the state’s pre-school through senior high school system is in dire straits – facing a questionable future given recent budgets and a disastrous combination of  higher education tuition increases and  K-12 budget cuts and shifts over the last few years?

Moreover, the drop-out rates among large percentages of our kids of color, especially, would seem to work severely against any notion of successful educational attainment by anywhere near the 75% advanced as a goal by Growth and Justice Policy Research group and its partner in this enterprise, the Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP).

What to do about generating both the public will and the public pressure to act in the enlightened self-interest to adequately fund and invoke policies that favor the state’s economic future through education? TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with a few of the leaders in this effort.

REP. CARLOS MARIANI-ROSA – State Representative and Executive Director, Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)

JENNIFER GODINEZ – Associate Director, Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)

DANE SMITH - President, Growth and Justice Policy Research

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Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune interview the producer, John Whitehead, and others key to the making of this original documentary from Twin Cities Public Television about the restoration of the ancient language of the indigenous Ojibway people. The film is narrated by Native novelist and poet Louise Erdrich and features Ojibway elders, educators and students from Ojibway tribes at Bemidji, Leech Lake, Red Lake, St. Croix and Lac Courte Oreilles.

JOHN WHITEHEAD, Independent ProducerFIRST SPEAKERS: Restoring the Ojibway Language and LESLIE HARPER, Director, Niigaane Ojibway Language Immersion SchoolLeech Lake Ojibway Reservation were among the collaborators in this production highlighting the teaching of this ancient – and highly complex - indigenous language.

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TruthToTell Oct 25: REDISTRICTING 2011: First, Consider Your Cities - Audio file HERE

And now it begins - at least at the local level. The battle over who is represented by whom for the next ten years is under way with discussions about the upshot of population growth or shrinkage in some districts as well as shifts from one district to the next - or several miles away. As the 2010 Census figures are compiled for presentation early next year, coalitions are forming to ensure that statewide redistricting is seriously reformed after decades of Legislative redistricting wound up in the courts - and still safe districts for incumbents were the outcome. When once we thought it possible Minnesota's eight Congressional districts might be whittled to seven by the Census outcome, it now appears we'll hold the eight by a very slim margin - as little as 1,500 souls.

TTT's ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN query those zeroing in on this issue - some for the coming referendum in Minneapolis, the others for Saint Paul or the statewide planning process quickly coming into place for 2011 and 2012.

On-air guests:

KEESHA GASKINS - Executive Director, League of Women Voters of Minnesota

MIKE DEAN - President, Common Cause, Minnesota

BARRY CLEGG, Chair, Minneapolis Charter Commission and Attorney, Gray Plant Mooty

JOHN VAN HECKE - Chair, Saint Paul Charter Commission and Executive Director, Minnesota 2020

First Person Radio Sep 29: ELONA-STREET-STEWART: Native Life in Education

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/29/2010

This week's guest is Elona Street-Stewart, chair of the St. Paul Board of Education. Street-Stewart is the first American Indian elected to the Saint Paul School Board and the first to serve on an urban school district board in Minnesota. She also chairs the American Indian Family CenterHer focus has long been on multicultural and cross-cultural issues.

Street-Stewart was cited this year by WomenWinning , an organization dedicated to electing women to public office, as being committed to providing a respectful, safe, nurturing and equitable learning environment where a diverse student body can meet the highest district and state standards. She is also devoted to helping students understand the relationship between their lives and the lives of others, and the relevance of their educational experience to their roles in society.

An elder in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), and an advocate for racial justice, peace and equal opportunity, she has served at all levels of the church, becoming one of four women honored July 4th of this year for their passion, dedication and faithfulness at the church's annual Women of Faith Awards breakfast at the 219th General Assembly (2010).

 


53:13 minutes (24.36 MB)

First Person Radio: Sept 8: The Status of Nonprofits: Marcia Avner & Jon Pratt - MCN*

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/08/2010

Nonprofits are feeling the pinch - not only financially, but politically, in this economic climate. Why politically? Because nonprofits stand to lose their tax status if they promote candidates or become too political. But their hands aren't complete tied, and the *Minnesota Council of Nonprofits (MCN) counsels their thousands of members to advocate and collaborate and coalesce to push for public policies that benefit the organizations and their hurting constituencies.

FPR's LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK (Seneca) and RICHARD LaFORTUNE (Inuit) talk with MCN stalwarts, retired Public Policy Director, now Fellow, Marcia Avner and long-time Executive Director, Jon Pratt about the conditions nonprofits must face these days and days to come.

GUESTS:

JON PRATT – Executive Director, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

MARCIA AVNER – Public Policy Fellow (Retired Director), Minnesota Council of Nonprofits


56:07 minutes (25.69 MB)