First Person Radio

CORRECTION: First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 28 @9AM: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 7: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 28: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice - Listen Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/28/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's new release is available at http://www.larrylong.org/.


46:36 minutes (42.67 MB)

First Person Radio-Weds, Sept 21@9:00AM: DOUG AND RACHEL LIMóN: Native Artists and Art Activists; TruthToTell Sept 19: TEACHERS AND TENURE: Achievement, Contracts, Certification - Listen Below

First Person Radio-Weds, Sept 21@9:00AM: DOUG AND RACHEL LIMóN: Native Artists and Art Activists

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talks with husband and wife artists Doug and Rachel Limón. Their work has won awards all over the Upper Midwest Region. And their art has also become part of significant collections. Doug's recent cradleboard project to create four new cradleboards received matching funds needed to complete the project (one cradleboard shown below). Rachel's "Moondance" is hand-sculptured clay and paint of stingrays in the moonlight.

 

Doug Limón (Oneida/Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe) is on the Advisory Board of All My Relations Arts, Minneapolis, MN; a member of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association (IACA), Albuquerque, NM; listed in the Source Directory of Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Washington, DC; a member of the Turtle Foundation USA, Bellingham, WA; a member of the Southwest Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA), Santa Fe, NM; a member of the Ziibiwing Center, Mt. Pleasant, MI; a member of the Intertribal Agriculture Council, Billings, MT; a member of the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of New Mexico; a former board member of the Northside Arts Collective (NAC) in Minneapolis, MN; and former Chairman of the Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce (MAICC).

The focus of Rachel Limón's work is on the beauty and intrigue of nature, either people, animals, plant or sea life. Rachel uses raku clay to express her inner creativity. She has explored a multitude of mediums such as photography, jewelry, watercolor and sumi-e painting as well. Many of her pieces are functional with the hope that nature and art can be enjoyed and cherished everyday. She is committed to community development through the arts.

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TruthToTell Sept 19: TEACHERS AND TENURE: Achievement, Contracts, Certification - ListenHERE; Watch it HERE.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen on Blip.tv or in our Archives above.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Education in Minnesota seems ever in upheaval. Well, everywhere. Witness the assault on teaching and teachers by Tea Partiers over the last year or so, resulting in several states going after teacher pay, benefits and general rights. Major changes have been installed in the schools over the last year or two or more. Teachers, parents and administrators in all districts, especially, face renewed pressures to build in reliable systems for teacher accountability and, in core city systems in particular, aimed at significantly narrowing the well-known achievement gaps between students of color and their white counterparts, but also improving learning overall, what with recent math and reading scores hitting historic lows nationally.

Several perceived remedies have been passed by the State Legislature, including:

•  alternative licensing and certification of professionals outside the system to enter the classroom – with proper supervision (since teaching methods are themselves are part and parcel of the field);

• despite many doubts and failures, charter schools continue their increases in numbers as alternatives for parents concerned with system schools;

• private and nonprofit teachers corps, such as Teach for America have been introduced to Minnesota, permitting newly graduated semi-volunteers to enter our classrooms for a couple of years’ service, then depart.

• teacher tenure has come under fire, especially when teachers’ union contracts ensure seniority as the time-tested safety net for teachers, good and bad.

Minneapolis is in the midst of contract negotiations and some parents and activists are stepping up and insisting on historic shifts in how teachers are evaluated and whether contracts should use only seniority to release or retain teachers or base tenure on some combination of seniority and competence and other criteria. It’s possible Minneapolis will become the bellwether for contractual reform.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI examine these issues with our guests this week.

GUESTS:

REP. CARLOS MARIANI-ROSA – DFL Lead, Minnesota House Education Reform Committee, Member of Education Finance Committee and Executive Director, Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)

MARY CECCONI – Executive Director, Parents United for Public Schools

LYNNELL MICKELSEN – Minneapolis Education Parent Activist; Blogger (Put Kids First Minneapolis); Editorialist and former Co-host, TruthToTell

LOUISE SUNDIN, President Emeritus and Lobbyist, Minneapolis Federation of Teachers; Trustee, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities; Executive Vice President of the Minneapolis Regional Labor Federation, AFL-CIO.

First Person Radio-Weds, Sept 21@9:00AM: DOUG AND RACHEL LIMóN: Native Artists and Art Activists-LISTEN BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/21/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talks with husband and wife artists Doug and Rachel Limón. Their work has won awards all over the Upper Midwest Region. And their art has also become part of significant collections. Doug's recent cradleboard project to create four new cradleboards received matching funds needed to complete the project (one cradleboard shown below). Rachel's "Moondance" is hand-sculptured clay and paint of stingrays in the moonlight.

 

Doug Limón (Oneida/Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe) is on the Advisory Board of All My Relations Arts, Minneapolis, MN; a member of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association (IACA), Albuquerque, NM; listed in the Source Directory of Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Washington, DC; a member of the Turtle Foundation USA, Bellingham, WA; a member of the Southwest Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA), Santa Fe, NM; a member of the Ziibiwing Center, Mt. Pleasant, MI; a member of the Intertribal Agriculture Council, Billings, MT; a member of the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of New Mexico; a former board member of the Northside Arts Collective (NAC) in Minneapolis, MN; and former Chairman of the Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce (MAICC).

The focus of Rachel Limón's work is on the beauty and intrigue of nature, either people, animals, plant or sea life. Rachel uses raku clay to express her inner creativity. She has explored a multitude of mediums such as photography, jewelry, watercolor and sumi-e painting as well. Many of her pieces are functional with the hope that nature and art can be enjoyed and cherished everyday. She is committed to community development through the arts.


54:23 minutes (49.79 MB)

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author; TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

A craggy mesa once housed Monument No. 2, the hottest, richest, most productive uranium mine in the Navajo homeland, in a remote desert near the Arizona-Utah line. To the families who have dwelled for generations in the spring-fed valley below, the mesa is the wounded center of their world. They and the hundreds of Indians who labored at the mine have been forever changed by the government’s desperate press for more nuclear weapons than any other nation on Earth.

Yellow Dirt is their story.

It is the saga of four generations whose lives have been shaped by uranium.
What happened at Monument No. 2 was repeated in communities across the reservation. Despite warnings from doctors and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners worked unprotected. Long after the uranium boom ended, the neighbors continued to live with contamination. The radioactive “yellow dirt” ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, their bread ovens, their churches and even their garbage dumps.

Few knew what had happened until Judy Pasternak wrote a prizewinning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful Congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage.

In Yellow Dirt, Pasternak provides gripping new details. She introduces the family of Adakai the Gambler, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose fates were intertwined with that of Monument No. 2 and with decisions made without their knowledge in distant capitals and labs. She weaves the personal and the political into a chronicle of betrayal, of willful negligence, and ultimately, of reckoning.

Join us on September 7th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with award winning author Judy Pasternak about her stunning book: Yellow Dirt: An American Story of a Poisoned Land and a People Betrayed. The book examines in depth the effects of uranium mining on the Dine (Navajo) lands, looking closely at what happened to several families who built houses using contaminated materials and drank from water poisoned with uranium. The book is a must read for everyone in Indian Country and those concerned about Indian lands and rights.
Judy Pasternak is an editor with Bloomberg News in Washington and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote about subjects ranging from a band of right-wing extremist bank robbers to the giant black hole at the center of the Milky Way.Yellow Dirt, her first book, made two "Best of 2010" lists: Publisher's Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. The book has also won awards for literary non-fiction, investigative journalism and environmental journalism. She is married, with one son.
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TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO HERE; VIDEO ARCHIVE HERE

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

First Person Radio-Sep 7: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author -Audio Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/07/2011

From Judy Pasternak's Website:

A craggy mesa once housed Monument No. 2, the hottest, richest, most productive uranium mine in the Navajo homeland, in a remote desert near the Arizona-Utah line. To the families who have dwelled for generations in the spring-fed valley below, the mesa is the wounded center of their world. They and the hundreds of Indians who labored at the mine have been forever changed by the government’s desperate press for more nuclear weapons than any other nation on Earth.

Yellow Dirt is their story.

It is the saga of four generations whose lives have been shaped by uranium.
What happened at Monument No. 2 was repeated in communities across the reservation. Despite warnings from doctors and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners worked unprotected. Long after the uranium boom ended, the neighbors continued to live with contamination. The radioactive “yellow dirt” ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, their bread ovens, their churches and even their garbage dumps.

Few knew what had happened until Judy Pasternak wrote a prizewinning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful Congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage.

In Yellow Dirt, Pasternak provides gripping new details. She introduces the family of Adakai the Gambler, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose fates were intertwined with that of Monument No. 2 and with decisions made without their knowledge in distant capitals and labs. She weaves the personal and the political into a chronicle of betrayal, of willful negligence, and ultimately, of reckoning.

Join us on September 7th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with award winning author Judy Pasternak about her stunning book: Yellow Dirt: An American Story of a Poisoned Land and a People Betrayed. The book examines in depth the effects of uranium mining on the Dine (Navajo) lands, looking closely at what happened to several families who built houses using contaminated materials and drank from water poisoned with uranium. The book is a must read for everyone in Indian Country and those concerned about Indian lands and rights.
Judy Pasternak is an editor with Bloomberg News in Washington and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote about subjects ranging from a band of right-wing extremist bank robbers to the giant black hole at the center of the Milky Way. Yellow Dirt, her first book, made two "Best of 2010" lists: Publisher's Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. The book has also won awards for literary non-fiction, investigative journalism and environmental journalism. She is married, with one son.

 


55:17 minutes (50.62 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down; First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO Link Below

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down-KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org/Livestream.com

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

When the inevitable development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO HERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota and the Department's Community Outreach Coordinator, Miguel Vargas. 

At the University of Minnesota, Child was recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. She was born on and remains a citizen of the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

Miguel Vargas has been Outreach Coordinator since Fall 2007. He coordinates the Ojibwemodaa Eta! Language Programs and Scholarships, outreaching to K-12 Schools/Youth Programs for visiting opportunities, and moderating the Minnesota Indian Affairs Listserv (MINN-IND).

First Person Radio:Weds, Aug 31 @9:00AM: BRENDA CHILD, PhD: Boarding Schools to Indian Studies; TruthToTell Aug 29: THE COMMON GOOD v INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - LISTEN BELOW-VIDEO UP-see Archives

Join Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) as she talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. At the University of Minnesota, she was a recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. Child was born on the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota where she is a citizen.

 Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell Aug 29: THE COMMON GOOD v INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - LISTEN HERE - VIDEO UP HERE

TruthToTell is now seen after the show on Blip.tv and at www.TruthToTell.org/Archives.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Before the main topic got underway, MARCY SHAPIRO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of OPEN ACCESS CONNECTIONS (formerly Twin City Community Voicemail) joined us in-studio to talk about her organization's loss of funding at the hands of a single office within the Minnesota Department of Human Services. "Today, 350 agencies across the entire state of Minnesota partner with Open Access Connections to allow nearly 5,000 individuals and families each year to have a safe and secure place to receive messages from employers, landlords, children’s schools, doctors, social service providers, family members and friends." No organization in the state and few across the country offer this unique service. OAC needs your help to donate funds, contact legislators to talk with Governor Dayton and the Commissioner of Human Services to reinstate the funding that has forced the layoffs of the all staff members.

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We’re living through an era where the notion of the common good has been overwhelmed by the idea of individualism; me and mine. This is manifested on many fronts as you well know. One of the most dramatic is this worship of the Constitution as a charter of limited government. We’re also witnessing the denigration of the public sphere and the selling of privatization as the remedy.

Dane Smith’s recent op-ed argues that the Federalists sought ratification of the constitution because they believed that a strong national government was necessary to promote the common welfare. Dane's work with Growth&Justice is predicated on the idea and the historic reality that government can and must play a strong role in achieving the public good.

Doug Rossinow will provide an historical perspective on this fundamental debate in America on contrasting ideas about the meaning of freedom. He teaches courses on the New Deal, Civil Rights and Reagan eras (among other things) — eras where these contrasting ideas (and practices) were in sharp conflict. His most recent book is Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

How can people be lured out of their self-imposed isolation – either technological or ideological – and see the value of working together toward the common good? How do you engage people, spurring both action on specific issues and reflection on the underlying values those actions represent? ISAIAH’s Doran Schrantz  help answer those questions.

Guest Host PROFESSOR TOM O'CONNELL of Metropolitan State University and Board Chair of CivicMedia/Minnesota joinsTTT PRODUCER/HOST ANDY DRISCOLL ask these questions of our guests.

DANE SMITH – Veteran journalist and President of Growth & Justice, a progressive think tank dedicated to making Minnesota more prosperous and fair.

DOUG ROSSINOW – Professor of History at Metropolitan State University and author of Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

DORAN SCHRANTZ – Executive Director of ISAIAH, a congregation-based organization that engages Minnesotans of faith on issues of economic and racial justice.

First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 08/31/2011

Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota and the Department's Community Outreach Coordinator, Miguel Vargas. 

At the University of Minnesota, Child was recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. She was born on and remains a citizen of the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

Miguel Vargas has been Outreach Coordinator since Fall 2007. He coordinates the Ojibwemodaa Eta! Language Programs and Scholarships, outreaching to K-12 Schools/Youth Programs for visiting opportunities, and moderating the Minnesota Indian Affairs Listserv (MINN-IND).


57:14 minutes (52.4 MB)