First Person Radio

First Person Radio:Weds, Aug 24 @9:00AM: NATIVE AMERICAN PHILANTHROPY: Funding Self-Determination - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org; TruthToTell ENCORE, Aug 22: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-AUDIO BELOW

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First Person Radio:Weds, Aug 24 @9:00AM: NATIVE AMERICAN PHILANTHROPY: Funding Self-Determination - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks about philanthropy in the American Indian community. The foundations represented by our guests have committed their resources to fostering Native self-determination, empowerment, education, leadership and community development. We’ll hear from program officers the role they see for Native philanthropy’s role in driving development and public policy through indigenous cultural values, organizing, and sense of community.

Guests:

CARLY HARE – Executive Director, Native Americans in Philanthropy

TONY GENIA – Senior Program Officer, Northwest Area Foundation

KELLY DRUMMER – Director of Fund Development and Programs, Tiwahe Foundation

DAVID NICHOLSON – Program Director, Headwaters Foundation

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Back next week on Livestream.com/TruthToTellMN .

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell ENCORE, Aug 22: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-AUDIOHERE

This week, we bring you an ENCORE of former Washington Post correspondent, T.R. Reid's excellent talk last June, who spoke to a gala gathering of some 250-300 single-payer advocates at Macalester College. The event brought together the Minnesota Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP) and the Minnesota Universal Health Care Coalition (MUHCC). Reid spoke about his experiences research and writing his book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, on the differences among health care systems throughout the industrialized world and asking us all why reasonably priced universal health care continues to elude us even as our friends and enemies overseas and next door cover everyone from womb to tomb and still pay less than half that of the US health system.

T.R. Reid is one of those people whose conversational tone makes it seem as though you’re talking over the backyard fence, but whose deep insights brought us a flavor of his overseas assignments, especially Japan, on National Public Radio for many years.

From his website:

T. R. Reid has become one of the nation’s best-known correspondents through his coverage of global affairs for the Washington Post, his books and documentary films, and his light-hearted commentaries on National Public Radio. He majored in Classics at Princeton University, where he has since done some teaching, and served as a naval officer, a teacher, and various other jobs. At the Washington Post, he covered Congress and four presidential campaigns. He was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo and in London. His story revealing the secret engagement of Crown Prince Naruhito is known in Japan as the dai-sukoopu – that is, “the great scoop.”

Reid has written and hosted documentary films for National Geographic TV, for PBS, and for the A&E network. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” He has written six books in English and three in Japanese and has translated one book from the Japanese. His most recent book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, came out in 2009 and became a national best-seller. PBS Frontline produced two documentary films, “A Second Opinion” and “Sick Around the World,” following Reid as he reported that book.

First Person Radio Aug 24: NATIVE AMERICAN PHILANTHROPY: Funding Self-Determination - AUDIO and LINKS BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 08/24/2011

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks about philanthropy in the American Indian community. The foundations represented by our guests have committed their resources to fostering Native self-determination, empowerment, education, leadership and community development. We’ll hear from program officers the role they see for Native philanthropy’s role in driving development and public policy through indigenous cultural values, organizing, and sense of community.

Guests:

CARLY HARE – Executive Director, Native Americans in Philanthropy

TONY GENIA – Senior Program Officer, Northwest Area Foundation (651-225-3878)

KELLY DRUMMER – Director of Fund Development and Programs, Tiwahe Foundation

DAVID NICHOLSON – Program Director, Headwaters Foundation


56:02 minutes (51.31 MB)

TruthToTell ENCORE, Mon, Aug 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio, Aug 17: DIANE WILSON: Dakota Author, Native Food Grower-Audio is UP BELOW

Back next week on Livestream.com/TruthToTellMN .

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell ENCORE, Mon, Aug 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

 This week, we bring you an ENCORE of former Washington Post correspondent, T.R. Reid's excellent talk last June, who spoke to a gala gathering of some 250-300 single-payer advocates at Macalester College. The event brought together the Minnesota Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP) and the Minnesota Universal Health Care Coalition (MUHCC). Reid spoke about his experiences research and writing his book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, on the differences among health care systems throughout the industrialized world and asking us all why reasonably priced universal health care continues to elude us even as our friends and enemies overseas and next door cover everyone from womb to tomb and still pay less than half that of the US health system.

T.R. Reid is one of those people whose conversational tone makes it seem as though you’re talking over the backyard fence, but whose deep insights brought us a flavor of his overseas assignments, especially Japan, on National Public Radio for many years.

From his website:

T. R. Reid has become one of the nation’s best-known correspondents through his coverage of global affairs for the Washington Post, his books and documentary films, and his light-hearted commentaries on National Public Radio. He majored in Classics at Princeton University, where he has since done some teaching, and served as a naval officer, a teacher, and various other jobs. At the Washington Post, he covered Congress and four presidential campaigns. He was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo and in London. His story revealing the secret engagement of Crown Prince Naruhito is known in Japan as the dai-sukoopu – that is, “the great scoop.”

Reid has written and hosted documentary films for National Geographic TV, for PBS, and for the A&E network. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” He has written six books in English and three in Japanese and has translated one book from the Japanese. His most recent book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, came out in 2009 and became a national best-seller. PBS Frontline produced two documentary films, “A Second Opinion” and “Sick Around the World,” following Reid as he reported that book.

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First Person Radio, Aug 17: DIANE WILSON: Dakota Author, Native Food Grower-Audio is UPHERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Diane Wilson, operations director of Dream of Wild Health Farm, is the author of Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past, which won a Minnesota Book award. She is a Mdewakanton descendent; her mother was enrolled on the Rosebud Reservation. Andy Driscoll co-hosts.

First Person Radio-Weds, Aug 17 @9:00AM: DIANE WILSON: Dakota Author, Native Food Grower -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org;TruthToTell, Aug.15: RADIO-CONTROLLED METERING: Are Those Electrical Waves Safe?

First Person Radio-Weds, Aug 17 @9:00AM: DIANE WILSON: Dakota Author, Native Food Grower -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org;

Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Diane Wilson, operations director of Dream of Wild Health Farm, is the author of Beloved Child: A Dakota Way of Life and Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past, which won a Minnesota Book award. She is a Mdewakanton descendent; her mother was enrolled on the Rosebud Reservation. Andy Driscoll co-hosts.

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TruthToTell, Aug.15: RADIO-CONTROLLED METERING: Are Those Electrical Waves Safe?-AUDIO is UP HERE. VIDEO is HERE!


Money invariably supersedes safety in the regulatory arena in Minnesota and most other states, and the damages done are always assessed after the fact, the burden always placed on the victim(s) to prove in administrative or legal proceedings that they and/or the public have/has been harmed by such operations.

One of the issues now being raised – perhaps a bit late in the game, but raised nevertheless is that of the so-called mandatory conversion of St. Paul’s water meters, currently read electronically by way of a little black panel mounted on the outside of our houses wired to the meter inside, to a new, radio-controlled meter which pulses every 14 seconds and can be read by a drive-by receiver. For some citizens and scientists, this is one electromagnetic signal too many ­– creating electronic pollution – and these people have descended on the St. Paul Regional Water System (SPRWS) Board to demand either that they halt the installation the 94,000 meters and transmitters (24,000 have already been installed) or that the department give residents the chance to opt-out, including those already in.

These advocates have met a stone wall downtown. The Board, which is chaired by City Councilmember Pat Harris, had already approved these new meters, but, nevertheless held a hearing to listen to presentations by neighborhood activists insisting that the signals produced are dangerous to our health. The department’s General Manager, Steve Schneider, insists that, no matter what some studies may say, they’re within federal and state regulations and the experience of the meter-makers themselves to install them and save money.

What is the science here that make these people crazy and their cats throw up? We know that EMF waves can cause problems, but are these meters a public health nuisance by their size and intensity? Or not?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL will talk with a couple of the advocates and a consultant who insist the science is solid that this is trouble pulsing away in our basements or water meter pits.

GUESTS:

PETRA BROKKEN – Community Advocate

LEO CASHMAN – Physicist, Health Educator, Community Advocate

DAMON COYNE – Building Biology Environmental Consultant; Principal, Intentional Environment

First Person Radio, Aug 17: DIANE WILSON: Dakota Author, Native Food Grower-Audio is UP BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 08/17/2011

Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Diane Wilson, operations director of Dream of Wild Health Farm, is the author of Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past, which won a Minnesota Book award. She is a Mdewakanton descendent; her mother was enrolled on the Rosebud Reservation. Andy Driscoll co-hosts.


56:05 minutes (51.35 MB)

First Person Radio-Weds, Aug 10 @9:00AM: DANIEL YANG: Author, Engaging Community-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

Join Laura Waterman Wittstock as she talks with Daniel YangCommunity Engagement Specialist with the Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI).

 Daniel grew up on the East Side of St. Paul and the Leech Lake Indian Reservation, reflecting his multi-cultural heritage of both Hmong and Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) ancestry. His first book, Kakuma-Turkana, Dueling Struggles: Africa’s Forgotten Peoples, is a photographic documentary of East African refugees and Indigenous communities, and includes a foreword by Nobel Prize recipient His Holiness the Dalai Lama.


As NACDI Community Engagement Specialist, Daniel led a community organizing campaign to install street light banners on Franklin Ave. designating it the American Indian Cultural Corridor, spearheaded the first community mural project in the American Indian Cultural Corridor, working with local American Indian artists and youth, and  organized a community planning committee for the largest Minnesota American Indian Month Kickoff Parade and Celebration to date.
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TruthToTell August 8: FACING RACE WINNERS: The Kids Have the Ideas - AudioHERE/Video COMING

TruthToTell has a policy of presenting programs that address the persistent problems of racism and poverty in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Those two social cancers combine to deprive huge groups of our neighbors from adequate food, housing, education and the other basic needs we all take for granted. Among the topics we’ve covered are race and discrimination in the classrooms around here, something we wish would simply disappear, but, according to UofM’s Institute on Law and Poverty, has become exponentially worse over the last several decades. All this, despite the lip service politicians give to efforts to desegregate and improve our schools.

It looks like it may be up to the children to help where we adults have failed
The Saint Paul Foundationits Facing Race Initiative, and the joint initiative for face-to-face civic engagement efforts known as InCommons have joined in one project with a competition for relative modest grants challenging organizations and individuals in reducing racism in their communities. The kids won out. And we’ll talk to representatives of the two winners about their plans and projects. Let’s meet the winners:

1. Project s.t.a.r.t. Leadership – Submitted by longtime schools advocate and activist Kate Towle of Minneapolis Idea Generator and Paul Robinson of Wilder Foundation.

  Kate Towle and Paul Robinson will apply the $2,500 Facing Race grant to support curriculum development, outreach and the ongoing work of Project s.t.a.r.t. Leadership – a youth-driven initiative that engages Minneapolis Public School students as leaders in racial equity work.

 “The heart of Project s.t.a.r.t. is that we can’t just rely on the adults in our schools to create the environment we want,” says Towle. “We have to engage students in making our schools safe, respectful and culturally-competent.” Towle, a Hamline University alumna, is an active racial justice facilitator who volunteers for the YWCA and consults with the Minneapolis Public Schools... s.t.a.r.t., named and created by students at South High School, stands for “students together against racial tension.”

2. Youth Peacekeepers – Submitted by Jake Branchaud-Linsk of Saint Paul.

 Jake Branchaud-Linsk, a philosophy and political science major at Hamline University, will use his grant to provide conflict resolution and communication training to groups of diverse high school students for use in facilitating conversations about race with younger peer groups. The inspiration for his idea came from his youth engagement work at the Dispute Resolution Center in Saint Paul, made possible by a Phillips Family Foundation scholarship. “I want to help youth apply good communication and mediation skills to discussions about race,” says Branchaud-Linsk. “Working with youth on this topic is exciting because we can make an early impact. They have their whole lives ahead of them to use the skills they’ll acquire through Youth Peacekeepers.”

Now, we’ll let the young people talk about doing something about this clinging issue. Thanks to Saint Paul Foundation’s Rowzat Shipchandler and Laura Mylan for helping us structure this show. 

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead the discussion with these committed young folks and 

 Rowzat Shipchandler

First Person Radio-Weds, Jul 27 at 9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org; TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government-AUDIO BELOW

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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First Person Radio-Weds,Jul 27@9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with AIM Co-founder, Clyde Bellecourt and Photographer Bob Zeller.

 Clyde Bellecourt and Bob Zeller have joined together to tell the story of the American Indian Movement's roots in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Indian community. Zeller began storytelling in video, audio, and photography after leaving Augsburg College in 1967. He taught film appreciation and coached debate. He chose to "drop out" as he puts it to "drop in" to the peace movement of the 1960s, whose Beat roots he found compelling.

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TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - AUDIO HERE

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GUESTS:

REP. MINDY GREILING – DFL Lead, House Education Finance Committee

MIKE DEAN – President, CommonCause/Minnesota

RICH NEUMEISTER – longtime public interest citizen lobbyist and award-winning open government activist and blogger

It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

Worse, the Capitol itself was locked down to citizens and visitors. And just as disturbing was the absence of citizens and visitors knocking on those doors to get a look at the resulting process and package.

Secrecy is a public leprosy eroding public confidence in government more deeply than even the normal frustrations we feel with the occasional snail’s pace of bureaucracy and the unjustified decisions government agencies can impose. Secrecy is infecting every corner of government, leaving the public out in the cold to participate in and understand the agreement, bills, laws, rules and regulations – not to mention the unspoken barriers to access thrown up to citizens and the media by lawmakers and agency officials alike.

Crisis management reared its ugly head again earlier this last week when the bills written in the dark by Mr. Dayton and the GOP and presented to the full House and Senate under cover of speed and secrecy were barely seen even by those whose job it is to vote on these matters, let alone analyze them for their effect on constituents. Why the rush? Of course, 22,000 state employees, not to mention constituents were clamoring for a restart of state government.

CommonCause/Minnesota worked to ensure at least a 72-hour deliberation and study period for the bills submitted and passed without a moment’s discussion or a single amendment allowed during the Special Session Gov. Dayton called. Of course, the three-day period was rejected on the grounds that – Naomi, are you listening? – it would prolong the already protracted state government shutdown. Crisis decision-making at its finest. Skip the details. Pass the bills, open the doors and get those workers back on the job. What more could they have done? Plenty.

Two DFL legislators – Rep. Mindy Greiling and Sen. John Marty – have introduced bills that would require open processes in all legislative work, but primarily all budget negotiations between and among legislative leaders and even between those leaders and the governor.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with open government advocates (are there any real secrecy defenders out there?) and examine the trend toward increasing secrecy in all aspects of public governance and media coverages.

First Person Radio-July 27: CLYDE BELLECOURT and BOB ZELLER:Recording AIM's Twin Cities Roots-AUDIO HERE

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/27/2011

Audio is up on First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock's and Andy Driscoll's conversation with AIM Co-founder, Clyde Bellecourt and Photographer Bob Zeller.

Clyde Bellecourt's telling the story of AIM's founding and its subsequent Wounded Knee confrontation with every federal law enforcement agency, not to mention all four military branches, was a chilling tale of the extent to the government has been willing to go to keep "upstart" Indians in their places. This and other stories of the volatile 60s and 70s will all appear in Bob Zeller's chronicle of  the counterculture years in in MInnesota and around the country. Stay tuned for more of this work's revelations and oral histories through CivicMedia's auspices.

Clyde Bellecourt and Bob Zeller have joined together to tell the story of the American Indian Movement's roots in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Indian community.

Zeller began storytelling in video, audio, and photography after leaving Augsburg College in 1967. He taught film appreciation and coached debate. He chose to "drop out" as he puts it to "drop in" to the peace movement of the 1960s, whose Beat roots he found compelling.


53:59 minutes (49.43 MB)

First Person Radio:Weds, July 6 @9:00AM: SHIRLEY K. SNEVE: Native Media Storyteller -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

First Person Radio:Weds, July 6 @9:00AM: SHIRLEY K. SNEVE: Native Media Storyteller -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

Please join Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Shirley K. Sneve. 

 She is the Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications, whose mission is to share Native stories with the world through support of the creation, promotion, and distribution of Native public media. She moved to Nebraska from Amherst, MA, where she was director of Arts Extension Service, a national arts service organization, based at the University of Massachusetts, from 2001-2004. A member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Sicangu Lakota) in South Dakota, Shirley was a founder of Northern Plains Tribal Arts Juried Show and Market, the Oyate Trail cultural tourism byway, and the Alliance of Tribal Tourism Advocates.

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TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

APOLOGIES TO ALL WHO TRIED LISTENING MONDAY MORNING!!

KFAI went off the air for quite some time this morning when a transformer outside the building, well, crapped out - as it were - made worse by the fact that someone really wise had planted a wrought iron fence in front of the transformer's access doors.

This program will be rescheduled for the latter part of August. Keep an eye - and ear - out for that. It should still be a very important topic at that time - unless our self-destructive sensibilities disappear before then.

First Person Radio July 6: SHIRLEY K. SNEVE: Native Media Storyteller - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/20/2011

Laura Waterman Wittstock  and Andy Driscoll of First Person Radio talk with Shirley K. Sneve, Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications, whose mission is to share Native stories with the world through support of the creation, promotion, and distribution of Native public media. Shirley moved to Nebraska from Amherst, MA, where she was director of Arts Extension Service, a national arts service organization, based at the University of Massachusetts, from 2001-2004. A member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Sicangu Lakota) in South Dakota, Shirley was a founder of Northern Plains Tribal Arts Juried Show and Market, the Oyate Trail cultural tourism byway, and the Alliance of Tribal Tourism Advocates.


55:38 minutes (50.93 MB)