First Person Radio

TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.orgFirst Person Radio Weds July 13 @9AM: DR. CHRIS MATO NUNPA: Author and Dakota Treaty Expert;

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

We’re living through an era where the notion of the common good has been overwhelmed by the idea of individualism; me and mine. This is manifested on many fronts. One of the most dramatic is this worship of the Constitution as a charter of limited government. We’re also witnessing the denigration of the public sphere and the selling of privatization as the remedy.

John Ritter

Dane Smith’s recent op-ed argues that the Federalists argued for ratification of the constitution because they believed that a strong national government was necessary to promote the common welfare. His work with Growth&Justice is predicated on the idea and the historic reality that government can and must play a strong role in achieving the public good.

Doug Rossinow will provide an historical perspective on this fundamental debate in America on contrasting ideas about the meaning of freedom. He teaches courses on the New Deal, Civil Rights and Reagan eras (among other things) — eras where these contrasting ideas (and practices) were in sharp conflict. His most recent book is Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

How can people be lured out of their self-imposed isolation – either technological or ideological – and see the value of working together toward the common good? How do you engage people, spurring both action on specific issues and reflection on the underlying values those actions represent? ISAIAH’s Doran Schrantz  will help answer those questions.

Guest Host PROFESSOR TOM O'CONNELL of Metropolitan State University and Board Chair of CivicMedia/Minnesota will ask these questions of his guests:

DANE SMITH – Veteran journalist and Executive Director of Growth & Justice, a progressive think tank dedicated to making Minnesota more prosperous and fair.

DOUG ROSSINOW – Professor of History at Metropolitan State University and author of Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

DORAN SCHRANTZ – Executive Director of ISAIAH, a congregation-based organization that engages Minnesotans of faith on issues of economic and racial justice.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO HERE

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.

First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/13/2011

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.


56:38 minutes (51.85 MB)

First Person Radio:Weds, July 6 @9:00AM: JAMES ROCK/JOEL HALVORSON: Astronomers to Natives; TruthToTell, Mon., July 4 @ 9AM: POLICE OVERREACHING-AND COVERING UP: Dangerous Liaisons-AUDIO BELOW

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with Jim Rock and Joel Halvorson about American Indian astronomy. This will be a very special program, not to be missed! The progress being made in recognition of American Indian views in the often reluctant science of astronomy is spectacular and due in no small part to the work of these two professionals: one Dakota and one white, working side by side.

 James Rock (Dakota) Jim has a Masters degree in education and has taught astronomy, chemistry and physics for almost 30 years. He has taught courses in Native Skywatchers Astronomy and American Indian Philosophy at Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Macalester and the University of Minnesota’s Indigenous Summer Science & Math Program called Andogiikendassowin /Wasdodyawacinpi (Seek To Know) in partnership with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Jim also works as an independent consultant and has worked for organizations such as NASA, NOAA, Native Americans in Philanthropy, Minnesota Planetarium Society and Dakota Wicohan.

 Joel Halvorson is a Program Consultant for the Minnesota Planetarium Society (MNPS). His responsibilities involve developing programs like the ExploraDome outreach program for a new state funded Planetarium. This future facility is now in the process of merging with the Bell Museum of Natural History as part of a future on campus facility at the University of Minnesota.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

IT'S TTT's 4TH ANNIVERSARY ON KFAI! LISTEN IN OR WATCH US ONLINE - AND PLEASE DONATE HERE:

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell now live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The fallout from RNC 2008 police abuse continues to ripple through the courts and common sense – not to mention fundamental Constitutional underpinnings. No matter what you want to believe about anarchists and purported violence and the like, police and media accounts of the threats posed by anti-war activists have been shown to be little more than exaggeration designed to instill fear first, among delegates to that year’s Republican National Convention delegates, and second, among average Joes and Janes throughout the state.

 Lingering police and FBI paranoia, much of it generated and unleashed by the Patriot Act and, eventually, two administrations’ Justice departments, feeds the use of federal and local law enforcement as powerful resistors to political dissent. Recently, the Obama Justice Department’s FBI has beefed up its domestic spying and organized resistance to anti-public policy protesters, continuing and expanding Bush domestic spying policies and activities. Support for Palestine gets you arrested or a grand jury subpoena in this country. Demonstrating against this President’s war policies can get you arrested and/or a phone tap. Worse, fear-mongering by both the right wing and the government is eroding support for all First Amendment rights to free speech and assembly.

So sure were both the police and the RNC that such lawsuits would probably be filed – and won – they bonded themselves against financial losses to the tune of $10 million. Much of that money has been recently paid out – mostly in settlements, not jury awards. One of those awards have gone to people whose rights were violated during raids. One of those went to St. Paul homeowner Mike Whelan and a trio of vegans who rented his duplex during the RNC. Representing Whelan and several other plaintiffs has been St. Paul Attorney, Ted Dooley.

But this overreaching by law enforcement, the violence too many cops use against average citizens, even in the normal course of duties, like traffic stops – then lying to cover it in reports and protected by other officers under the unwritten Code of Silence, has reached epidemic levels, especially in the Minneapolis Department. This culture has fed on itself and turned otherwise conscientious cops into lying and covering for their brothers and sisters in blue for over a Century. Chronicling this festering sore is retired Minneapolis police sergeant, Mike Quinn, whose book, Walking with the Devil: The Police Code of Silence, is in its second and revised printing.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with Quinn, Dooley and Whelan (sounds like an Irish law firm) about these very serious breaches of Constitutional guarantees and what they represent in the treatment of minorities and political dissenters throughout this area and the United States as a whole.

GUESTS:

MIKE QUINN – Retired Police Officer and Author of Walking with the Devil (Inside the Code of Silence)

TED DOOLEY – Plaintiffs’ Attorney for several RNC Activists

MIKE WHELAN – Civil lawsuit awardee in raid on his St. Paul home by Officers and Deputies  before the RNC

First Person Radio July 6: JAMES ROCK/JOEL HALVORSON: Astronomers to Natives - Audio BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/06/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with Jim Rock and Joel Halvorson about American Indian astronomy. This will be a very special program, not to be missed! The progress being made in recognition of American Indian views in the often reluctant science of astronomy is spectacular and due in no small part to the work of these two professionals: one Dakota, one white, working side by side.

 

 James Rock (Dakota) Jim has a Masters degree in education and has taught astronomy, chemistry and physics for almost 30 years. He has taught courses in Native Skywatchers Astronomy and American Indian Philosophy at Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Macalester and the University of Minnesota’s Indigenous Summer Science & Math Program called Andogiikendassowin /Wasdodyawacinpi (Seek To Know) in partnership with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Jim also works as an independent consultant and has worked for organizations such as NASA, NOAA, Native Americans in Philanthropy, Minnesota Planetarium Society and Dakota Wicohan.

 

  Joel Halvorson is a Program Consultant for the Minnesota Planetarium Society (MNPS). His responsibilities involve developing programs like the ExploraDome outreach program for a new state funded Planetarium. This future facility is now in the process of merging with the Bell Museum of Natural History as part of a future on campus facility at the University of Minnesota.

56:41 minutes (51.9 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., June 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist

We’re recorded this week, but check us out next week and call in to talk about Cops and the Code of Silence once again. Also, back next week on Livestream.com/TruthToTellMN .

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

TruthToTell, Mon., June 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?

This week, we bring you an excellent talk by former Washington Post correspondent, T.R. Reid, who spoke to a gala gathering of some 250-300 single-payer advocates at Macalester College in mid-June. The event brought together the Minnesota Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP) and the Minnesota Universal Health Care Coalition (MUHCC). Reid spoke about his experiences research and writing his book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, on the differences among health care systems throughout the industrialized world and asking us all why reasonably priced universal health care continues to elude us even as our friends and enemies overseas and next door cover everyone from womb to tomb and still pay less than half that of the US health system.

T.R. Reid is one of those people whose conversational tone makes it seem as though you’re talking over the backyard fence, but whose deep insights brought us a flavor of his overseas assignments, especially Japan, on National Public Radio for many years.

From his website:

T. R. Reid has become one of the nation’s best-known correspondents through his coverage of global affairs for the Washington Post, his books and documentary films, and his light-hearted commentaries on National Public Radio. He majored in Classics at Princeton University, where he has since done some teaching, and served as a naval officer, a teacher, and various other jobs. At the Washington Post, he covered Congress and four presidential campaigns. He was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo and in London. His story revealing the secret engagement of Crown Prince Naruhito is known in Japan as the dai-sukoopu – that is, “the great scoop.”

Reid has written and hosted documentary films for National Geographic TV, for PBS, and for the A&E network. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” He has written six books in English and three in Japanese and has translated one book from the Japanese. His most recent book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, came out in 2009 and became a national best-seller. PBS Frontline produced two documentary films, “A Second Opinion” and “Sick Around the World,” following Reid as he reported that book.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist -AUDIO HERE

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE: 

Listen to last week's program with L. Frank Manriquez HERE.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune talk with Sarah James, a native Gwich'in from Arctic Village, Alaska, USA, and a board member of the International Indian Treaty Council. She was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2002, together with Jonathon Solomon and Norma Kassi. They received the prize for their struggles for protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) from plans of oil exploration and drilling. Oil and gas exploration would disturb the life cycle of the Porcupine caribou, a foundation of the Gwich'in culture for 20,000 years.

Sarah is the board chair and a spokesperson for the Gwich’in Steering Committee, and has educated people around the world about the porcupine-caribou herd and the importance of protecting “the Sacred Place where Life Begins” (the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) from oil exploration and drilling. She has received many awards, including the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, the National Conservation Land Trust Award and the Ecotrust Award for Indigenous Leadership

First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist -AUDIO UP BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 06/22/2011

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE: 

Listen to last week's program with L. Frank Manriquez HERE.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune talk with Sarah James, a native Gwich'in from Arctic Village, Alaska, USA, and a board member of the International Indian Treaty Council. She was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2002, together with Jonathon Solomon and Norma Kassi. They received the prize for their struggles for protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) from plans of oil exploration and drilling. Oil and gas exploration would disturb the life cycle of the Porcupine caribou, a foundation of the Gwich'in culture for 20,000 years.

Sarah is the board chair and a spokesperson for the Gwich’in Steering Committee, and has educated people around the world about the porcupine-caribou herd and the importance of protecting “the Sacred Place where Life Begins” (the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) from oil exploration and drilling. She has received many awards, including the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, the National Conservation Land Trust Award and the Ecotrust Award for Indigenous Leadership


55:38 minutes (50.93 MB)

First Person Radio: May 25: CHIEF ARVOL LOOKING HORSE: Peace Advocate; CLYDE BELLECOURT-AUDIO IS UP

On-air date: 
Wed, 05/25/2011

Arvol Looking Horse was born on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota in 1954.  Raised by his Grandparents Lucy and Thomas Looking Horse, he learned the culture and spiritual ways of the Lakota. He speaks both Lakota and English. At age twelve, he was given the enormous responsibility of becoming the 19th generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe, the youngest in history. He is a spiritual leader among the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota People. He holds an honorary Doctorate from the University of South Dakota, and travels and speaks extensively on peace, environmental and native rights issues. He has been the recipient of several awards, including the Wolf Award of Canada for his dedicated work for peace. A skilled horseman, he shares his knowledge with the youth on the long distance rides that take place in South Dakota throughout the year

Also, Clyde Bellecourt returns from his talk before the UN conference on Indigenous People and reads the speech he gave to the Assembly there.

Join Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) and their conversation with Arvol Looking Horse, founder of the annual World Peace and Prayer Day and the outgrowth organization, Wolakota Foundation


44:41 minutes (20.45 MB)

First Person Radio: May 4: AMERICAN INDIAN MONTH BEGINS: Heid Erdrich & Justin Huenemann-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 05/04/2011

May is Minnesota American Indian Month and First Person Radio presents several programs featuring Native leaders and a play by Laura Waterman Wittstock - The Visitor. This week, Laura and cohost, Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Poet Heid Erdrich and Indian Community Development leader, Justin Huenemann.

A member of the Turtle Mountain Band of OjibwayHeid E. Erdrich grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota. She earned degrees from Dartmouth College and The Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars.

Heid Erdrich is author of four poetry collections, most recently National Monuments from Michigan State University Press. Cell Traffic: New and Selected Poems is forthcoming in 2012. Her first book Fishing for Myth was recently re-issued from New Rivers Press. Heid Erdrich also authored The Mother’s Tongue, Salt Publishing’s Earthworks series, and co-edited Sister Nations: Native American Women on Community, Minnesota Historical Society Press. A recipient of Minnesota State Arts Board fellowships, awards from The Loft Literary Center, the Archibald Bush Foundation and elsewhere, Heid Erdrich has four times been nominated for the Minnesota Book Award which she won in 2009.

Justin Kii Huenemann (Navajo) is president and CEO of the Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI), an organization that's bringing other nonprofits together to buy land for use by Indian-owned for-profit businesses. The first of its kind in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, NACDI is configured as an alliance of major Indian nonprofits and several Indian businesses in the metropolitan area committed to community-building through sector economic development and large-scale development. Foremost in our transformation plan to develop a new community infrastructure is to build community capacity and assets within high growth economic sectors.

NACDI grew out of the work of the Hennepin County American Indian Families Project (AIFP), a partnership project between Hennepin County and the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors organization.  Through this community-driven initiative, the idea of focusing on American Indian community through community economic development came about.  The result was the formation of the NACDI Taskforce, a coalition of more than 60 individuals — including representatives from American Indian nonprofits, American Indian businesses, Hennepin County, the City of Minneapolis, Minneapolis Community and Technical College, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Minneapolis Public Schools, as well as community-based and philanthropic organizations. A strategic plan for NACDI was completed in October 2006 after a 10-month, community-engaged, strategic-planning process.


55:29 minutes (25.4 MB)

First Person Radio-Apr 27: KRIS RHODES & JOY RIVERA: American Indian Cancer Foundation-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 04/27/2011

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll on April 27th as we talk withKris Rhodes and Joy Rivera of the American Indian Cancer Foundation. We will discuss the many challenges confronting the Indian community in cancer areas where prevalence is high and growing. Kris was a long-time researcher at the University of MN and Joy Rivera is a well-known community organizer who worked with and taught Indian youth for decades.

Kris Rhodes is the director of the American Indian Cancer Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening Native communities through improved cancer prevention, early detection and access to quality cancer care. She is an enrolled member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe.  She was born and raised on the Fond du Lac Reservation in Northern Minnesota.  Ms. Rhodes has Master of Public Health degree in Public Health Administration & Policy and a Bachelor degree in Community Health Education both from the University of Minnesota.  Over the past two decades, Kris has worked in improving the health of American Indian communities. She has been involved in community-based research on topics such as, breastfeeding promotion, ear infections, teen pregnancy prevention, but is most deeply involved in and passionate about tobacco issues in American Indian populations.  Within this role, she directly supported the development and evaluation of activities related to these efforts, including education and promotion of cultural tobacco use, documenting prevalence rates among youth and adults, youth prevention programs, policies, smoking cessation and community events. 

Joy Rivera does outreach in the Twin Cities indigenous community as the colon cancer screening navigator of the American Indian Cancer Foundation.  In this work, she can tell you and anyone who will listen what to do to prevent colon cancer. She belongs to the Snipe Clan of the Seneca Nation Haudenosaunee People. She has more than 30 years teaching experience in the Indigenous community at the junior high, senior high and adult levels of education. Joy taught at both the late Heart of the Earth Survival School and the Red School House. For the past 17 years, she coordinated the nationally-recognizedOgitchidag Gikinooamaagad Peer Education Program that traveled throughout Indian County teaching other Indigenous youth about health-related topics through live theater. This program developed and implemented its own culturally-specific peer education curriculum to Indigenous youth grades 7-12. 


55:06 minutes (25.23 MB)

First Person Radio: April 20: JOHN ECHOHAWK: Native American Rights Fund-Audio Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 04/20/2011

John Echohawk, a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, was a co-founder of the Native American Rights Fund in 1970 and has been its Executive Director since 1977.

The Native American Rights Fund has been involved in most of the major Indian rights litigation since 1970. John serves on many national boards and has received numerous service awards and other recognition for his leadership in the Indian law field. In 1992, he served on the Clinton-Gore transition team for the Department of the Interior and in 2008 he served on the Obama-Biden transition team for the Department of the Interior. B.A., University of New Mexico (1967); J.D., University of New Mexico (1970); admitted to practice law in Colorado.

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with John Echohawk (Pawnee) about his illustrious legal career as an attorney, as leader of the Native American Rights Fund, and about his political work on behalf of Indian Country. This is a show not to be missed!

Quick Note: Monday evening, April 18, Laura Waterman Wittstock was presented with the Frank Premack Farr Award for a life of service to Indian journalism, education and advocacy. There to chant an Honor Song in her behalf was the Little Earth of United Tribes Drum and players. It was stunning and stirring - and we congratulate our colleague, once more.

“Laura was the quiet force behind the scenes cultivating the next group of young journalists through her programming at Migizi Communications. She provided young people with an opportunity to learn about the communications industry and gave them the tools to tell their own stories,” said board chairman Art Coulson.


53:33 minutes (24.52 MB)