First Person Radio

First Person Radio: Apr 13: ALBERT MCLEOD: Two-Spirit AIDS Advocate-AUDIO UP

On-air date: 
Wed, 04/13/2011

Albert McLeod is a fifth generation descendent of the Cree and Scottish families who worked in the Hudson Bay Company fur trade from 1832 to 1980. He was raised in Cormorant and The Pas in northern Manitoba during the 1960s and 70s.

Albert was one of the founders of the Manitoba Aboriginal AIDS Task Force where he was employed as the Program Manager from 1991-2001; and was also one of founders the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network in 1997. He has over twenty years experience as a human rights advocate and is one of the founding directors of the Two-Spirited People of Manitoba.

Albert is a free-lance educator specializing in Aboriginal cultural reclamation, textile art and community development. He is currently the Community Development Coordinator for the 595 Prevention Team (info) in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Canada's Gay/Lesbian News Service, XTRA, published a lengthy article on Albert McLeod's life pursuits.

First Person Radio's LAURA WATERMAN WITTSTOCK and RICHARD LaFORTUNE (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Albert McLeod about the issues and future of Two-Spirited Natives, especially those confronting the ravages of AIDS and HIV.


53:49 minutes (24.64 MB)

TTT This Week: Monday, April 11- 9AM: WHITE PRIVILEGE REDUX: Our Advantage Persists; First Person Radio -April 6: CLYDE BELLECOURT & CHIEF TERRY NELSON: Roseau River First Nation meets AIM Founder

REMEMBER TO CALL IN AND JOIN THE CONVERSATION – 612-341-0980

AND THANK YOU FOR PUTTING US OVER THE TOP OF OUR $80,000 MEMBERSHIP GOAL LAST WEEK!

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What does it mean to be white in America?

Today? Yesterday? Historically? Has anything really changed since slavery and colonialism enslaved and dismissed whole peoples the US Constitution defines “all men…” as in “all men are created equal”?

To understand what it means to be born into whiteness and the privilege automatically conferred on us because of that accident of birth, we must examine that privilege in both the choices we’re allowed to make and the assumptions others make about us.

To understand what it means to be white in America is to look honestly and deeply into what whites have done to others in the name of white superiority or white supremacy. And to admit that, in reality, little has changed in the minds of many, probably most white men and women in America requires the exercise of standing outside ourselves, outside our institutions and outside our subtle and/or behavior to really understand how we maintain our privilege.

The concept and the reality of white privilege has been explored in scholarly terms, in sociological treatises and in legal briefs. And, still we exercise that privilege deep inside our personal and collective cultures sometimes consciously, often unconsciously, and it’s the unconscious part that needs shaking loose in order to rid ourselves of the ignorance of our own racism, to be able to admit that even we progressives are afflicted with the ability to exclude others on the basis of color and culture.

White privilege has essentially meant living where we want, when we want and not to be shuffled into the only conclaves and neighborhoods that real estate agents, bankers and government financiers want us to live. And it means having greater influence over most of the means of production and services and governance.

White privilege has for years been the subject of the annual White Privilege Conference coming to Minneapolis-St Paul for the first time. It will gather at the Bloomington Sheraton, this coming Wednesday April 13th through Saturday, the 16th. Sponsored by the Minnesota Justice Collaborative, it brings together many of those scholars and advocates for giving greater visibility and deeper understanding of what makes America tick in ways that prevents us from growing into the country we claim to envision in the documents that created this country…after we ripped it violently from its indigenous people.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with the two primary organizers of this conference, themselves devoted to resolving this question of what it means to be white in America.

GUESTS:

LISA ALBRECHT – Morse-Minnesota Alumni Association Distinguished Professor of Teaching, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Co-Chair, White Privilege Conference 2011

RAUL RAMOS – Community Outreach & Training Specialist, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, Co-Chair, White Privilege Conference 2011

REMEMBER TO CALL IN AND JOIN THE CONVERSATION – 612-341-0980

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First Person Radio -April 6: CLYDE BELLECOURT & CHIEF TERRY NELSON: Roseau River First Nation meets AIM Founder  - Audio HERE

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Clyde Bellecourt and Chief Terry Nelson of Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation Tribe of Manitoba, Canada.


Clyde Bellecourt is a founder of the American Indian Movement in 1968. The Movement was founded in Minneapolis and although it became a worldwide activity, Clyde stayed and lived in Minneapolis, to make permanent change right here in his own local community. He has worked in education from the start of Heart of the Earth Survival School in 1972 to the present. He deeply believes that education is the key to the success of the Indian community. That has been his consistent message. The Clyde H. Bellecourt Scholarship Fund has awarded $222,687 in 22 college scholarships to both graduate and undergraduate since 2005 to American Indian students who are studying in the fields of Education, American Indian Studies, or Indigenous Languages.

Chief Terry Nelson of Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation Tribe of Manitoba, Canada, and was elected national Chief of Canada's Assembly of First Nations in 2009, has led the fight for a settlement over Indian lands surrendered in 1903. He is also warning both Canadian and American Indian Country of the damages sure to come from a pipeline connecting the expensive - and feared - tar sands oil extraction projects in Northern Alberta.

Together, Nelson and Bellecourt discuss the real history of their countries, especially the usurpation of lands and resources as well as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples - signed by Canada (finally) last November, more recently by President Barack Obama, making the the US the last resister to finally sign on to that resolution..

Mr. Bellecourt has traveled to many countries in the world, notably the United Nations Conferences in Geneva on Indigenous people; Ireland to develop culturally based schools that teach the native language; Germany to work with groups interested in studying American Indian culture and the political issues being faced by Indians in the United States; several Central and South American countries in coordination with the International Treaty Council; and within the United States, to reservation areas where he was called for help by elders and families.

Clyde Bellecourt regularly meets with a large number of community members in the American Indian and other communities of color, particularly when issues arise. Frequently called upon to mediate, represent, or conduct discussions or conflicts between groups, he carefully gathers the information on the issue, gains an understanding of the core demands or understandings and goes forward to negotiate or represent a minority view that is not being heard by authorities. The information can include documents, phone conversations, re-telling of what each side is saying, and an analysis of the best way to proceed.

As for Terry Nelson, here is an article written two years ago:

WINNIPEG - OTTAWA - An outspoken and controversial Manitoba chief is throwing his name in the race to replace outgoing Assembly of First Nations national chief Phil Fontaine.

Roseau River Anishnabe First Nation Chief Terry Nelson told the Free Press he will formally announce his candidacy Friday morning in Winnipeg.

Nelson said he will run on a platform to end dependence on Ottawa and turn instead to international investment in economic development for first nations in Canada.

"You can’t expect the governemnt will finance economic development on reserves," said Nelson.

He said he’s already spoken with various parties in the U.S., China, and other countries who appear interested in working with Canada’s first nations.

Fontaine, a Manitoban from Sagkeeng, will announce this afternoon he will not seek re-election after three terms at the helm of the AFN.

Nelson said he has nothing but respect for Fontaine but said the chiefs in Canada are ready for more action.

Nelson is himself a controversial figure, known to take hardline approaches to negotiations including blockades.

Nelson last week was returned to the helm of his own band following a bizarre electoral period that required Indian and NOrthern Affairs Canada to step in.

In March, two different chiefs were elected in Roseau River in two separate elections and both claimed victory. INAC set the results of both aside and called another election but it had to be postponed because Roseau River was evacuated due to spring flooding.

The election was finally held May 27; Nelson won.

First Person Radio -April 6: CLYDE BELLECOURT & CHIEF TERRY NELSON: Roseau River First Nation meets AIM Founder

On-air date: 
Wed, 04/06/2011

 

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Clyde Bellecourt and Chief Terry Nelson of Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation Tribe of Manitoba, Canada.

 Clyde Bellecourt is a founder of the American Indian Movement in 1968. The Movement was founded in Minneapolis and although it became a worldwide activity, Clyde stayed and lived in Minneapolis, to make permanent change right here in his own local community. He has worked in education from the start of Heart of the Earth Survival School in 1972 to the present. He deeply believes that education is the key to the success of the Indian community. That has been his consistent message. The Clyde H. Bellecourt Scholarship Fund has awarded $222,687 in 22 college scholarships to both graduate and undergraduate since 2005 to American Indian students who are studying in the fields of Education, American Indian Studies, or Indigenous Languages.

Chief Terry Nelson of Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation Tribe of Manitoba, Canada, and was elected national Chief of Canada's Assembly of First Nations in 2009, has led the fight for a settlement over Indian lands surrendered in 1903. He is also warning both Canadian and American Indian Country of the damages sure to come from a pipeline connecting the expensive - and feared - tar sands oil extraction projects in Northern Alberta.

Together, Nelson and Bellecourt discuss the real history of their countries, especially the usurpation of lands and resources as well as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples - signed by Canada (finally) last November, more recently by President Barack Obama, making the the US the last resister to finally sign on to that resolution.

 


59:02 minutes (27.03 MB)

First Person Radio: Feb 23rd: TIOKASIN GHOSTHORSE: First Voices Indigenous Radio - Audio BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 02/23/2011

Tiokasin Ghosthorse is from the Cheyenne River Lakota (Sioux) Nation of South Dakota. He is the host of First Voices Indigenous Radio on WBAI NY - Pacifica Radio. Tiokasin has been described as “a spiritual agitator, natural rights organizer, Indigenous thinking process educator and a community activator.” One reviewer called him “a cultural resonator in the key of life.”

Tiokasin has had a long history in Indigenous rights activism and advocacy. He spoke, as a teenager, at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. He has supported or participated in many of the major occupations including Wounded Knee, South Dakota, Lyle Point, Washington, Western Shoshone, Nevada, and Big Mountain, Arizona. Ever since his UN work, he has been actively educating people who live on Turtle Island (North America) and overseas about the importance of living with each other and with Mother Earth.

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and  Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with Tiokasin Ghosthorse, host of First Voices Indigenous Radio at WBAI, New York City.

LIVE on the web: www.kfai.org/

LATER on the web: www.kfai.org/firstpersonradio


55:31 minutes (25.41 MB)

First Person Radio: Feb 9: DR. KARINA WALTERS: On Two-Spirit Health - Audio Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 02/09/2011

First Person Radio hosts Richard LaFortune and Andy Driscoll talk with Karina L. Walters, Associate Professor and William P. and Ruth Gerberding Endowed Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington.

An enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Dr. Walters founded and directs the University-wide, interdisciplinary Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI). Her research focuses on historical, social, and cultural determinants of physical and mental health among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

One example of her work is the HONOR Project – a nationwide health survey that examines the impact of historical trauma, discrimination, and other stressors on the health and wellness of Native Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Two-Spirited men and women.

Dr. Walters has received multiple awards in recognition of her contribution to Native health research and in 2008 Dr. Walters was selected by Curve magazine as one of the top 20 lesbian academics in the world. She was also a Fulbright recipient and Honorary Visiting Scholar at Ngā Pae o te Maramatanga National Institute for Research Excellence in Maori Development and Advancement at the University of Auckland, NZ.

53:06 minutes (24.31 MB)

CHANGE! First Person Radio Weds, Feb 2-9AM: CORINE FAIRBANKS replaces Tiokasin Ghosthorse - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

CHANGE: Tiokasin Ghosthorse ran into the Chicago storm and will join FPR another day.

Corine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".

First Person Radio Weds, Feb 2-9AM: TIOKASIN GHOSTHORSE - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Tiokasin Ghosthorse is from the Cheyenne River Lakota (Sioux) Nation of South Dakota. He is the host of First Voices Indigenous Radio on WBAI NY - Pacifica Radio. Tiokasin has been described as “a spiritual agitator, natural rights organizer, Indigenous thinking process educator and a community activator.” One reviewer called him “a cultural resonator in the key of life.”

Politics for the Lakota is spiritual and is not separate from the rest of life. Indigenous peoples are after an inclusive politics, an inclusive world.

Tiokasin has had a long history in Indigenous rights activism and advocacy. He spoke, as a teenager, at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. He has supported or participated in many of the major occupations including Wounded Knee, South Dakota, Lyle Point, Washington, Western Shoshone, Nevada, and Big Mountain, Arizona. Ever since his UN work, he has been actively educating people who live on Turtle Island (North America) and overseas about the importance of living with each other and with Mother Earth.

He is a survivor of the “Reign of Terror” from 1972 to 1976 on the Pine Ridge, Rosebud and Cheyenne River Lakota Reservations, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs Boarding and Church Missionary School systems designed to “kill the Indian and save the man.”

Tiokasin Ghosthorse is also a master musician and one of the great exponents of the ancient red cedar Lakota flute, and plays traditional and contemporary music, using both Indigenous and European instruments. He has been a major figure in preserving and reviving the cedar wood flute tradition and has combined “spoken word” and music in performances since childhood. Tiokasin performs worldwide and has been featured at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, Lincoln Center, Madison Square Garden, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at the United Nations as well as at numerous universities and concert venues.

REMINDER: Fundraiser for TruthToTell - September 22nd - 3114 W 28th St Minneapolis, MN 55416

  JOIN US

TruthToTell and CivicMedia's first fundraiser Wednesday, September 22nd from 7:00-9:00PM, hosted by Barbra Wiener and co-hosted by 35 Friends and Fellow Travelers*

At the home of George Reid,  3114 W 28th St Minneapolis, MN 55416  View Larger Map 

Join us for an evening of great food and fun - and a little more about TTT and CivicMedia and First Person Radio, TTT's newest sibling.

DONATION: $50 - more if you can, less if you can't. 3114 W 28th St Minneapolis, MN 55416  View Larger Map 

Cohosts


REMINDER: Fundraiser for TruthToTell - September 22nd - 3114 W 28th St Minneapolis, MN 55416

JOIN US

TruthToTell and CivicMedia's first fundraiser Wednesday, September 22nd from 7:00-9:00PM, hosted by Barbra Wiener and co-hosted by 35 Friends and Fellow Travelers: 

At the home of George Reid,  3114 W 28th St Minneapolis, MN 55416  View Larger Map 

Cohosts


Join us for an evening of great food and fun - and a little more about TTT and CivicMedia and First Person Radio, TTT's newest sibling.

DONATION: $50 - more if you can, less if you can't. RSVP HERE. Hope to see you on the 22nd.

Also DONATE HERE