green party

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A Green Agenda for the Attorney General’s Office? A conversation with Green Party candidate Andy Dawkins

On-air date: 
Mon, 10/06/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Andy Dawkins is running for attorney general as the endorsed candidate of the Minnesota Green Party.  A 15-year veteran of the State Legislature, former DFL endorsed candidate for mayor in St. Paul, and  an experienced lawyer and public administrator, Dawkins has a real opportunity to meet the 5 percent threshold required to restore major party status to the Greens, many political observers suggest.

That, in itself, would be a significant achievement if you believe that democracy in Minnesota is served by breaking the monopoly of the two-party system.  But even more significant are the policies an Attorney General Dawkins would pursue. They include:

  • Divestment of the $3 billion currently invested in fossil fuel companies by the State Investment Board
  • Opposition to the Polymet and Twin Metals copper nickel mining projects as currently proposed
  • Promotion of rank-choice voting statewide
  • Keeping a vigilant eye on corporate welfare schemes
  • Proposing specific policies to reduce gun violence
  • Supporting labor organizing—including in the attorney general’s office itself
  • Repealing Minnesota’s laws prohibiting cannabis use and replacing them with a system of government regulated use

Co-hosts Siobahn Kierens and Tom O’Connell will discuss candidate Dawkin’s positions on these and other issues, as well as the actual role of the attorney general’s office. What exactly is the job of the attorney general?  What are the opportunities as well as limits (legal and otherwise) of actually implementing a Green/Progressive agenda?

Support TruthToTell by donating whatever you can afford here: DONATE NOW

TruthToTell Monday, March 26-9AM: SOCIAL JUSTICE PROTEST: Minnesota’s Legacy; TruthToTell March 19: FLOODING THE BALLOT: Legislating by Constitutional Amendment

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WELCOME To WEEK ONE  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell Monday, March 26-9AM: SOCIAL JUSTICE PROTEST: Minnesota’s Legacy - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

The history of social activism in Minnesota is as much about protest as it is about advocacy. Social justice and protest are inextricably linked.

When it comes to legal dissent and embracing protest as political expression and free speech, official forces in the US and Minnesota have always resisted. When resistance meets resistance, when power resists those who speak to power, someone usually gets hurt. Such clashes date to the founding of all political entities everywhere – and Minnesota’s own history is rife and rich with the quest for justice, but recently – say, over the past 40-50 years of social and political upheaval – the forces of government have become more virulent, more dangerous in the name of homeland security and the so-called war on terror, than any previous periods, save those between the industrial giants and their exploited labor masses.

With every passing day, it seems, the government, even under Barak Obama, perhaps especially under this President, the Justice Department and local police forces keep stretching what they believe are justified intrusions into our private lives, not to mention our Constitutional right to publicly protest, to dissent from official policies maintaining our involvement in war and nation-building, in protecting despots over the people the rule. Thus do local and federal police forces now have the declared legal wherewithal to use any means necessary to quell such expression.

Those who have spent their lives or part of them standing up to these forces who would trample the rights of the rest of us to demand the elimination of discrimination, of racism, or the inequality of all humanity in every field of human endeavors are often praised in eulogies because they’ve died doing so.

Occasionally, some progress is claimed and rewarded with institutional change or with a cultural shift, slow as they all may be. Those still around to accept the kudos deserve them for their work as well as their survival.

The history of these phenomena is captured in a marvelous little volume by revered Minnesota Historian, Rhoda Gilman, one of the truly articulate chroniclers of Minnesota’s historical realities, including the definitive biography of Minnesota’s first state governor, Henry Sibley. Her latest book, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition, traces our conflicts beginning with the imposition on Minnesota’s Native peoples of the white man’s greed which itself came to a head during the Dakota Uprising 150 years ago this year, and takes us right up through the rise of the political right and the clashes in between.

Among the events demonstrating precisely the importance of protest was the 1969 takeover of the UofM’s Morrill Hall by African-American students. That upheaval led to the creation of the U’s first dedicated department – the African-American Studies Department, now the African-American and African Studies DepartmentMorrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund was established by alumni attending "We Still Have a Charge to Keep" events three years ago, the 40th Anniversary of V-DAY at Morrill Hall.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests how effective such work have been in altering the political and institutional landscape long considered uneven and unfair.

GUESTS:

RHODA GILMAN – Historian, retired from the Minnesota Historical Society; former Green Party candidate for Lieutenant Governor; Author, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition

ROSE MARY FREEMAN MASSEY – Original member and President, 1969 UofM Afro American Action Committee; co-founder with Dr. Horace Huntley of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund; Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College History Department.

MELVIN GILES – St. Paul Community activist, peace advocate, community gardener; One of the first two recipients of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund.

PROF. JOHN S. WRIGHT – Instructor, African American literature, art and history; Africa and African diasporic studies; namesake of the John S. Wright Scholarship Fund (study abroad).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell March 19: FLOODING THE BALLOT: Legislating by Constitutional Amendment - Audio Podcast HERE

Are we becoming California by a back door? California law is peppered with voter-passed initiatives and referenda. Is this true democracy? Or a denigration of representative government?

Photo by Shekleton (Shekshots) 

The Minnesota Constitution does not allow what California’s does: passing and repealing state statutes by IR&R – Initiative, Referendum and Recall. Not that Republicans haven’t tried to install that device in the Constitution (current House File 2562King Banaian [R-St. Cloud] would do just that), claiming that true democracy is when citizens vote directly for state laws, bypassing the Legislature. This would be 7th amendment offered up this year. (As this is written, the Minnesota Senate is  about to place the Voter ID issue on November's ballot.)

But to pass laws by popular vote right now, legislators can place them on the ballot only in the form of Constitutional amendments. (Referenda, or the repeal of existing state law, is not currently allowed at all. Recall of state office holders is allowed by a convoluted process involving the courts.)

So – this year and last – new but frustrated Republican majorities in both houses have found their rightwing agenda neutralized by the veto pen of DFL Governor Mark Dayton. In response they’re attempting to send their entire agenda to the ballot box – some bills already having been vetoed, others not. The issues already heading for the voters or possibly on the ballot thus far:

The Marriage Amendment – defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Placed on this year’s November ballot last session. (Vice Pres. Walter Mondale and fmr Chief Justice Kathleen Blatz just announced their opposition to this.)

Shoot First – Vetoed this session. So-called castle doctrine principle expanded to allow gun owners to shoot first much sooner – and ask questions later.

Voter ID – Vetoed last session, now on the docket for passage to the November ballot. Requires a photo ID before voting – never mind the millions with no access to such identification.

“Right-to-Work” – This may be floundering – but it would remove the requirement that a worker sign on to union membership in a union shop.

Tax Bill Supermajorities – This may be on the back burner as well. Would require a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to vote in the affirmative for any tax bill to pass.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests about individual and collective issues around the flood of Constitutional amendments this session and last – in search for answers about both the wisdom and strategy of piling amendments on the ballot in such a crucial election as this year’s – what with redistricting forcing legislators and Congressmen and women in new territories and a ballot full of offices from President and US Senate on down through judicial races and – yes, Constitutional amendments and, perhaps, even other local ballot questions.

GUESTS:

SUSIE BROWN – Public Policy DirectorMinnesota Council of Nonprofits

HEATHER MARTENS – President, Protect Minnesota

SHAR KNUTSON – President, MN AFL-CIO

TruthToTell Monday, March 26-9AM: SOCIAL JUSTICE PROTEST: Minnesota’s Legacy - AUDIO Podcast BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 03/26/2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WELCOME To WEEK ONE  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The history of social activism in Minnesota is as much about protest as it is about advocacy. Social justice and protest are inextricably linked.

When it comes to legal dissent and embracing protest as political expression and free speech, official forces in the US and Minnesota have always resisted. When resistance meets resistance, when power resists those who speak to power, someone usually gets hurt. Such clashes date to the founding of all political entities everywhere – and Minnesota’s own history is rife and rich with the quest for justice, but recently – say, over the past 40-50 years of social and political upheaval – the forces of government have become more virulent, more dangerous in the name of homeland security and the so-called war on terror, than any previous periods, save those between the industrial giants and their exploited labor masses.

With every passing day, it seems, the government, even under Barak Obama, perhaps especially under this President, the Justice Department and local police forces keep stretching what they believe are justified intrusions into our private lives, not to mention our Constitutional right to publicly protest, to dissent from official policies maintaining our involvement in war and nation-building, in protecting despots over the people the rule. Thus do local and federal police forces now have the declared legal wherewithal to use any means necessary to quell such expression.

Those who have spent their lives or part of them standing up to these forces who would trample the rights of the rest of us to demand the elimination of discrimination, of racism, or the inequality of all humanity in every field of human endeavors are often praised in eulogies because they’ve died doing so.

Occasionally, some progress is claimed and rewarded with institutional change or with a cultural shift, slow as they all may be. Those still around to accept the kudos deserve them for their work as well as their survival.

The history of these phenomena is captured in a marvelous little volume by revered Minnesota Historian, Rhoda Gilman, one of the truly articulate chroniclers of Minnesota’s historical realities, including the definitive biography of Minnesota’s first state governor, Henry Sibley. Her latest book, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition, traces our conflicts beginning with the imposition on Minnesota’s Native peoples of the white man’s greed which itself came to a head during the Dakota Uprising 150 years ago this year, and takes us right up through the rise of the political right and the clashes in between.

Among the events demonstrating precisely the importance of protest was the 1969 takeover of the UofM’s Morrill Hall by African-American students. That upheaval led to the creation of the U’s first dedicated department – the African-American Studies Department, now the African-American and African Studies DepartmentMorrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund was established by alumni attending "We Still Have a Charge to Keep" events three years ago, the 40th Anniversary of V-DAY at Morrill Hall.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests how effective such work have been in altering the political and institutional landscape long considered uneven and unfair.

GUESTS:

RHODA GILMAN – Historian, retired from the Minnesota Historical Society; former Green Party candidate for Lieutenant Governor; Author, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition

ROSE MARY FREEMAN MASSEY – Original member and President, 1969 UofM Afro American Action Committee; co-founder with Dr. Horace Huntley of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund; Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College History Department.

MELVIN GILES – St. Paul Community activist, peace advocate, community gardener; One of the first two recipients of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund.


42:32 minutes (38.94 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., Jan 9 @9AM: MEDICAL MARIJUANA: Fears Overcoming Reality?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Jan 9 @9AM: MEDICAL MARIJUANA: Fears Overcoming Reality?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

What is your perception of marijuana? Are you dead set against its use? Or could you be persuaded that what is actually calledcannabis (marijuana is a Spanish term assigned by someone a long time ago) is a plant about as beneficial as broccoli when consumed as directed?

 How much do we really know about this controversial plant called pot, weed, grass, reefer and, no doubt, a couple of other names – almost anything but “good” for most politicians and the larger law enforcement community?

Minnesota is not among the 16 states and the District of Columbia that have, by one means or another, usually by a citizens ballot petition, enacted laws removing most of their prior penalties for the cultivation, processing and distribution of cannabis for a significant number of ailments, most of them including AIDS, anorexia, arthritis, cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraine, persistent muscle spasms, including those associated with multiple sclerosis, seizures associated with but not limited to epilepsy, and severe nausea. Covered conditions vary, but, in every case, a doctor’s formal approval for its use is required and, in most instances, even an approved patient cannot possess more than one ounce or, perhaps an ounce-and-a-half.

However, although a law allowing the use of marijuana as a medical treatment has not yet passed in Minnesota (this state does not allow citizens initiative or referendum as most of those approving states do, but that’s another issue for another day), Minnesotadoes allow possession of one and one-half ounces of marijuana without penalty. Where you got the stuff might be interesting to law enforcement, since holding any amount above the 1-1/2 ounces is a felony (even in states where’s it’s been approved).

That said – the real arguments that haunt marijuana’s life in these United States, for either medical or recreational use, may be more political than scientific at this stage. Those who have discovered and benefitted from its salutary properties don’t give a hang about what makes it work so well for them. On the other hand, the spectre of reefer madness may be dancing through the memories and perceptions of others persuaded that cannabis is as addictive as cocaine and thus bound to ruin the life of anyone daring to consume it. The 1930s film of the same name depicts users as going off their nut in response to smoking marijuana. No one has ever witnessed such a reaction. But it was this perception that got the stuff placed on the Federal Government’s drug list as aSchedule I substance, right up there with heroine and cocaine.

It’s been condemned as a “gateway” drug to the worst of addictions, and yet its proponents insist that at least a half-dozen prescription drugs – namely oxycodoneoxycontin, and others – have been abused literally to death, especially young people, whereas no one is known to have overdosed on marijuana.

This week, we talk with advocates for legalizing cannabis in Minnesota (and elsewhere), at least for medical purposes, but, in the long run, to get the Feds to drop its ranking down to a Schedule III substance, available by prescription. The state of Washington has an initiative ballot question legalizing pot entirely, not just for medical purposes.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query three members of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) of Minnesota, each with their own stories about why they believe this stuff  is a godsend to sick people, and may, in fact, be highly beneficial to take in on a regular basis, illness or no.

GUESTS:

RANDY QUAST ~ Executive Director, MN NORML

KURT HANNA ~ Treasurer, MN NORML

KATHY RIPPENTROP ~ Medical Marijuana Caregiver, MN NORML Member

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell Jan 2: MOVE-TO-AMEND: The Case Against Corporate Personhood - AUDIO HERE

Back in early November TruthToTell brought you a great conversation with David Cobb, former Green Party Presidential candidate and national spokesperson for MoveToAmend – the strengthening effort to remove the designation of personhood from corporate entities in the United States. That corporate personhood has seriously damaged this republic is clear in any analysis of this nation’s economic, political and social history and the deference courts have paid to corporations regarding the Bill of Rightsand a myriad of other claims that compete with real persons.

 This week, we are presenting both an encore of that discussion and the remainder of the hour with MTA Minnesota Coordinator,Nathan John Ness and two of his colleagues with an update on MoveToAmend’s current wok in light of the Occupy movement and their symbiotic relationship.


Here’s a bit of what we used to announce that show last month:

 What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?


 In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend.

 GUESTS:

 

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded)

 

NATHAN JOHN NESS – Minnesota Organizer for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded and Live)

 

PHYLLIS RODEN – Move To Amend activist, Conference on a Constitutional Convention at Harvard participant (Live)

 

ROBIN MONAHAN – Move To Amend activist who, with his brother, Laird, walked the length of the US in 2010 to bring attention to corporate personhood. (Live)

 

 

 


ruthToTell, Mon., Jan 9 @9AM: MEDICAL MARIJUANA: Fears Overcoming Reality?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Jan 9 @9AM: MEDICAL MARIJUANA: Fears Overcoming Reality?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

What is your perception of marijuana? Are you dead set against its use? Or could you be persuaded that what is actually calledcannabis (marijuana is a Spanish term assigned by someone a long time ago) is a plant about as beneficial as broccoli when consumed as directed?

 How much do we really know about this controversial plant called pot, weed, grass, reefer and, no doubt, a couple of other names – almost anything but “good” for most politicians and the larger law enforcement community?

Minnesota is not among the 16 states and the District of Columbia that have, by one means or another, usually by a citizens ballot petition, enacted laws removing most of their prior penalties for the cultivation, processing and distribution of cannabis for a significant number of ailments, most of them including AIDS, anorexia, arthritis, cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraine, persistent muscle spasms, including those associated with multiple sclerosis, seizures associated with but not limited to epilepsy, and severe nausea. Covered conditions vary, but, in every case, a doctor’s formal approval for its use is required and, in most instances, even an approved patient cannot possess more than one ounce or, perhaps an ounce-and-a-half.

However, although a law allowing the use of marijuana as a medical treatment has not yet passed in Minnesota (this state does not allow citizens initiative or referendum as most of those approving states do, but that’s another issue for another day), Minnesotadoes allow possession of one and one-half ounces of marijuana without penalty. Where you got the stuff might be interesting to law enforcement, since holding any amount above the 1-1/2 ounces is a felony (even in states where’s it’s been approved).

That said – the real arguments that haunt marijuana’s life in these United States, for either medical or recreational use, may be more political than scientific at this stage. Those who have discovered and benefitted from its salutary properties don’t give a hang about what makes it work so well for them. On the other hand, the spectre of reefer madness may be dancing through the memories and perceptions of others persuaded that cannabis is as addictive as cocaine and thus bound to ruin the life of anyone daring to consume it. The 1930s film of the same name depicts users as going off their nut in response to smoking marijuana. No one has ever witnessed such a reaction. But it was this perception that got the stuff placed on the Federal Government’s drug list as aSchedule I substance, right up there with heroine and cocaine.

It’s been condemned as a “gateway” drug to the worst of addictions, and yet its proponents insist that at least a half-dozen prescription drugs – namely oxycodoneoxycontin, and others – have been abused literally to death, especially young people, whereas no one is known to have overdosed on marijuana.

This week, we talk with advocates for legalizing cannabis in Minnesota (and elsewhere), at least for medical purposes, but, in the long run, to get the Feds to drop its ranking down to a Schedule III substance, available by prescription. The state of Washington has an initiative ballot question legalizing pot entirely, not just for medical purposes.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query three members of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) of Minnesota, each with their own stories about why they believe this stuff  is a godsend to sick people, and may, in fact, be highly beneficial to take in on a regular basis, illness or no.

GUESTS:

RANDY QUAST ~ Executive Director, MN NORML

KURT HANNA ~ Treasurer, MN NORML

KATHY RIPPENTROP ~ Medical Marijuana Caregiver, MN NORML Member

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell Jan 2: MOVE-TO-AMEND: The Case Against Corporate Personhood - AUDIO HERE

Back in early November TruthToTell brought you a great conversation with David Cobb, former Green Party Presidential candidate and national spokesperson for MoveToAmend – the strengthening effort to remove the designation of personhood from corporate entities in the United States. That corporate personhood has seriously damaged this republic is clear in any analysis of this nation’s economic, political and social history and the deference courts have paid to corporations regarding the Bill of Rightsand a myriad of other claims that compete with real persons.

 This week, we are presenting both an encore of that discussion and the remainder of the hour with MTA Minnesota Coordinator,Nathan John Ness and two of his colleagues with an update on MoveToAmend’s current wok in light of the Occupy movement and their symbiotic relationship.


Here’s a bit of what we used to announce that show last month:

 What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?


 In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend.

 GUESTS:

 

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded)

 

NATHAN JOHN NESS – Minnesota Organizer for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded and Live)

 

PHYLLIS RODEN – Move To Amend activist, Conference on a Constitutional Convention at Harvard participant (Live)

 

ROBIN MONAHAN – Move To Amend activist who, with his brother, Laird, walked the length of the US in 2010 to bring attention to corporate personhood. (Live)

 

 

 


TruthToTell-Mon, Jan 2-9AM: MOVE-TO-AMEND: The Case Against Corporate Personhood-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

LAST CALL FOR 2011: PLEASE HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE – AND TAKE A TAX DEDUCTION FOR 2011!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell-Mon, Jan 2-9AM: MOVE-TO-AMEND: The Case Against Corporate Personhood-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Back in early November TruthToTell brought you a great conversation with David Cobb, former Green Party Presidential candidate and national spokesperson for MoveToAmend – the strengthening effort to remove the designation of personhood from corporate entities in the United States by way of aConstitutional amendment. That corporate personhood has seriously damaged this republic is clear in any analysis of this nation’s economic, political and social history and the deference courts have paid to corporations regarding the Bill of Rights and a myriad of other claims that compete with real persons.

This week, we are presenting both an encore of that discussion and the remainder of the hour with MTA Minnesota Coordinator, Nathan John Ness and two of his colleagues with an update on MoveToAmend’s current wok in light of the Occupy movement and their symbiotic relationship.

Here’s a bit of what we used to announce that show last month: 

What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?

In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend.

GUESTS:

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded)


NATHAN JOHN NESS – Minnesota Organizer for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded and Live)


PHYLLIS RODEN – Move To Amend activist, Conference on a Constitutional Convention at Harvard participant (Live)


ROBIN MONAHAN – Move To Amend activist who, with his brother, Laird, walked the length of the US in 2010 to bring attention to corporate personhood. (Live)

 


TruthToTell Jan 2: MOVE-TO-AMEND: The Case Against Corporate Personhood - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 01/02/2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back in early November TruthToTell brought you a great conversation with David Cobb, former Green Party Presidential candidate and national spokesperson for MoveToAmend – the strengthening effort to remove the designation of personhood from corporate entities in the United States. That corporate personhood has seriously damaged this republic is clear in any analysis of this nation’s economic, political and social history and the deference courts have paid to corporations regarding the Bill of Rights and a myriad of other claims that compete with real persons.

This week, we are presenting both an encore of that discussion and the remainder of the hour with MTA Minnesota Coordinator, Nathan John Ness and two of his colleagues with an update on MoveToAmend’s current wok in light of the Occupy movement and their symbiotic relationship.

Here’s a bit of what we used to announce that show last month: 

What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?

In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend.

GUESTS:

GUESTS:

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded)


NATHAN JOHN NESS – Minnesota Organizer for MOVE to AMEND (Recorded and Live)


PHYLLIS RODEN – Move To Amend activist, Conference on a Constitutional Convention at Harvard participant (Live)


ROBIN MONAHAN – Move To Amend activist who, with his brother, Laird, walked the length of the US in 2010 to bring attention to corporate personhood. (Live)

 


58:00 minutes (53.1 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon.,Nov 7@9AM: DAVID COBB-MOVE TO AMEND/ST PAUL'S RCV - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

GIVE TO THE MAX IS BACK - for 2011: PLEASE CLICK ON THE APPLICABLE BUTTON IN THE BOX AND HELP US HELP YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT'S GOING ON IN YOUR WORLD OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. DONATE TODAY!! And Thank You!

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes or under Archives tab above!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 A reminder for St. Paul Voters: Tuesday is Election Day, when all seven City Council seats and four of seven School Boardseats are up for election under the city’s new Ranked Choice Voting system, allowing you to cast your first-choice, second-choice and, if present, third and fourth-choices for City Council candidates in your ward. We’ve aired discussions among each of five of the contested races for Council over the last four weeks, and those are available by click on the Archives tab above and scrolling down to your particular race. Three of those four shows are also in video under the Archives tab. Our First Segment this week will cover some of the pitfalls of the new system, if you’re not careful. There was no Primary, so all candidates who filed for these offices are on your ballot. The tope four vote-getters among ten School Board candidates will win. 

RCV does not apply to the School Board race.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

GIVE TO THE MAX IS BACK - for 2011: PLEASE CLICK ON THE APPLICABLE BUTTON IN THE BOX AND HELP US HELP YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT'S GOING ON IN YOUR WORLD OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. DONATE TODAY!! And Thank You!

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes or under Archives tab above!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A reminder for St. Paul Voters: Tuesday is Election Day, when all seven City Council seats and four of seven School Boardseats are up for election under the city’s new Ranked Choice Voting system, allowing you to cast your first-choice, second-choice and, if present, third and fourth-choices for City Council candidates in your ward. We’ve aired discussions among each of five of the contested races for Council over the last four weeks, and those are available by click on the Archives tab above and scrolling down to your particular race. Three of those four shows are also in video under the Archives tab. Our First Segment this week will cover some of the pitfalls of the new system, if you’re not careful. There was no Primary, so all candidates who filed for these offices are on your ballot. The tope four vote-getters among ten School Board candidates will win. RCV does not apply to the School Board race.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?

Some history:

In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

Presidents and early political figures – including Lincoln, Cleveland [1888], Eisenhower [1958] and the original Progressive, Wisconsin’s Robert LaFollette [in 1897] – plus legal scholars –  have condemned the role of corporations in American political life and in every aspect our economy, many of those luminaries saying that uncontrolled corporations represent serious threats to our nation’s political and economic stability – and still they persist through their economic and political control, mergers, acquisitions, let alone their refusal to heed employee and consumer rights, to push for more.

Now comes an overt movement to reverse all of those rulings by means of a Constitutional amendment and calling itself Move to Amend. The amendment would add language that says Congress and the states can regulate campaign contributions and expenditures, rather than directly address the legal finding that election law denied corporations their right to free speech. Minnesota has its own chapter or branch and we’ll hear more about all of this as Move to Amend becomes one of the siren songs of theOccupy phenomenon.
TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend – after we highlight the practical pitfalls of Ranked Choice Voting in St. Paul tomorrow with our Resident Expert.

GUESTS:

Segment 1:

JEANNE MASSEY – President, FairVote/Minnesota, Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) Advocates

Segment 2:

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND

MARK HALVORSON – Board Member, fmr Director, Center for Election Integrity; Local Organizer, MOVE to AMEND

NATHAN JOHN NESS – Local Organizer, MOVE to AMEND 

TruthToTell, Nov 7: DAVID COBB-MOVE TO AMEND/ST PAUL'S RCV - Audio BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 11/07/2011
GIVE TO THE MAX IS BACK - for 2011: PLEASE CLICK ON THE APPLICABLE BUTTON IN THE BOX AND HELP US HELP YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT'S GOING ON IN YOUR WORLD OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. DONATE TODAY!! And Thank You!

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes or under Archives tab above!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A reminder for St. Paul Voters: Tuesday is Election Day, when all seven City Council seats and four of seven School Boardseats are up for election under the city’s new Ranked Choice Voting system, allowing you to cast your first-choice, second-choice and, if present, third and fourth-choices for City Council candidates in your ward. We’ve aired discussions among each of five of the contested races for Council over the last four weeks, and those are available by click on the Archives tab above and scrolling down to your particular race. Three of those four shows are also in video under the Archives tab. Our First Segment this week will cover some of the pitfalls of the new system, if you’re not careful. There was no Primary, so all candidates who filed for these offices are on your ballot. The tope four vote-getters among ten School Board candidates will win. RCV does not apply to the School Board race.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What do we mean by corporate personhood – and why is this not a good thing?

Some history:

In 1819, the Supreme Court, in Dartmouth College v. Woodward, recognized corporations as having the same rights as natural persons for the purpose of entering into contracts and enforcing those contracts. Later, in 1886, the Court’s Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad decision (118 U.S. 394 [1886]) recognized corporations as persons for the purposes of the Fourteenth Amendment (states must provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdiction).

Those two rulings have thus provided the century-old underpinnings for a number of subsequent decisions equating corporations with real people, two of the most recent being Buckley v. Valeo, which equates campaign finance with free speech – a true precedent in its own right – followed by last year’s 5-4 Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission) ruling, yanking all restrictions on corporate (and union) campaign monies and allowing unlimited dollars to flow directly to support or defeat candidates, just not to the campaigns themselves.

The 2010 elections demonstrated starkly the fallout from all of these rulings on the make-up of Congress, especially the reversal of the Democratic House majority to Republicans, and of several governorships and state legislative bodies. The best examples of the latter are Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Florida, and the passage of truly onerous, anti-worker, anti-teacher legislation. Corporate personhood gave life and power to the Koch brothers’ wealth as the primary financing tool of both the Tea Party entities and specific electoral contests in those states.

Presidents and early political figures – including Lincoln, Cleveland [1888], Eisenhower [1958] and the original Progressive, Wisconsin’s Robert LaFollette [in 1897] – plus legal scholars –  have condemned the role of corporations in American political life and in every aspect our economy, many of those luminaries saying that uncontrolled corporations represent serious threats to our nation’s political and economic stability – and still they persist through their economic and political control, mergers, acquisitions, let alone their refusal to heed employee and consumer rights, to push for more.

Now comes an overt movement to reverse all of those rulings by means of a Constitutional amendment and calling itself Move to Amend. The amendment would add language that says Congress and the states can regulate campaign contributions and expenditures, rather than directly address the legal finding that election law denied corporations their right to free speech. Minnesota has its own chapter or branch and we’ll hear more about all of this as Move to Amend becomes one of the siren songs of the Occupy phenomenon. 

David Cobb is National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited. He is a lawyer, political activist, and engaged citizen. He has sued corporate polluters, lobbied elected officials, run for political office himself, and has been arrested for non-violent civil disobedience. In 2002 David ran for Attorney General of Texas, pledging to use the office to revoke the charters of corporations that repeatedly violate health, safety and environmental laws. He did not win the office, but the Green Party of Texas grew dramatically during his campaign from four local chapters to twenty-six. In 2004, he ran for President of the United States on the Green Party ticket and successfully campaigned for the Ohio recount.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI engage local and national advocates on the role of corporations and Move to Amend – after we highlight the practical pitfalls of Ranked Choice Voting in St. Paul tomorrow with our Resident Expert.

GUESTS:

Segment 1:

JEANNE MASSEY – President, FairVote/Minnesota, Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) Advocates

Segment 2:

DAVID COBB – former Presidential Candidate for the US Green Party, National Projects Director of Democracy Unlimited and official spokesperson for MOVE to AMEND

NATHAN JOHN NESS – Minnesota Organizer, MOVE to AMEND


58:53 minutes (53.92 MB)