Laura Wittstock

CORRECTION: First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 28 @9AM: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 7: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 28: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice - Listen Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/28/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's new release is available at http://www.larrylong.org/.


46:36 minutes (42.67 MB)

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate – AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/14/2011

Robert Desjarlait is Ojibwe-Anishinabe from Red Lake, Minnesota. He is a co-founder of Protect Our Manoomin – a Minnesota Anishinaabe grassroots organization that informs and educates on mining and its effects on manoomin. DesJarlait is involved as a facilitator for White Bison Wellbriety groups in the Twin Cities. He is a journalist and has written for The Circle Newspaper. He is also a member of the University of Minnesota Council of Elders.

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll get an update on the wild rice and other highly sensitive environmental issues threatening the survival of wild rice in the Upper Midwest ricing areas in Minnesota. Wild Rice - Mahnoomin - is one of the sacred foods of the Anishinabe. It has been harvested by environmentally protected processes for centuries by the Dakota and Anishinabe peoples.


50:59 minutes (46.69 MB)

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate - KFAI FM90.3/106.7/Streamed @KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 12: INSIDE KFAI: Become an Insider, Too - LISTEN BELOW and WATCH

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate - KFAI FM90.3/106.7/Streamed @KFAI.org

Robert Desjarlait is Ojibwe-Anishinabe from Red Lake, Minnesota. He is a co-founder of Protect Our Manoomin – a Minnesota Anishinaabe grassroots organization that informs and educates on mining and its effects on manoomin. DesJarlait is involved as a facilitator for White Bison Wellbriety groups in the Twin Cities. He is a journalist and has written for The Circle Newspaper. He is also a member of the University of Minnesota Council of Elders.

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll get an update on the wild rice and other highly sensitive environmental issues threatening the survival of wild rice in the Upper Midwest ricing areas in Minnesota. Wild Rice - Mahnoomin - is one of the sacred foods of the Anishinabe. It has been harvested by environmentally protected processes for centuries by the Dakota and Anishinabe peoples.

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TruthToTell, Sept 12: INSIDE KFAI: Become an Insider, Too - LISTEN HERE and/or WATCH HERE

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE to CivicMedia HERE!

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Most of you who see our announcements and hear our shows may not really know what KFAI is about deep down – at least not all of it. As a community-based station – YOUR station, to be sure – we’re made up of about five staff and a few hundred volunteers – including all of us programmers and producers, etc. None of us are paid.

We’re your basic nonprofit – and we survive and thrive on contributions from people and foundations, etc., but, like all nonprofits, we have a governing board and a mess of important committees who all toil in the background to keep us a viable operating radio station as well as a solvent nonprofit.

This week, we bring you inside KFAI and give you a chance to hear about us and ask questions of a few of the key people who help make KFAI tick, usually well out of the limelight, but willing to devote time and energy – and money, of course – to keep us going.

What you may not know is that you, too, could be a part of this crew and we’ll let our board and committee activists talk about what’s really needed around here and the opportunities you have to help us out.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL chats with four of our most active members, including our board’s chair – and we encourage you to get active with KFAI (and CivicMedia).

GUESTS:

JOEL ZIMMERMAN – Chair, KFAI, Fresh Air, Inc. Board of Directors/Executive Committee

ZUHUR AHMED – Board Member and Host of KFAI’s Somali Voices

TED SINGER – Chair, Governance Committee, KFAI Board and longtime KFAI Volunteer

JOHN SLADE – KFAI Board Second Vice President/Executive Committee, Nominations Committee, and Co-Convener, KFAI’s Strategic Planning Committee

First Person Radio-Weds, Aug 10 @9:00AM: DANIEL YANG: Author, Engaging Community-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

Join Laura Waterman Wittstock as she talks with Daniel YangCommunity Engagement Specialist with the Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI).

 Daniel grew up on the East Side of St. Paul and the Leech Lake Indian Reservation, reflecting his multi-cultural heritage of both Hmong and Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) ancestry. His first book, Kakuma-Turkana, Dueling Struggles: Africa’s Forgotten Peoples, is a photographic documentary of East African refugees and Indigenous communities, and includes a foreword by Nobel Prize recipient His Holiness the Dalai Lama.


As NACDI Community Engagement Specialist, Daniel led a community organizing campaign to install street light banners on Franklin Ave. designating it the American Indian Cultural Corridor, spearheaded the first community mural project in the American Indian Cultural Corridor, working with local American Indian artists and youth, and  organized a community planning committee for the largest Minnesota American Indian Month Kickoff Parade and Celebration to date.
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TruthToTell August 8: FACING RACE WINNERS: The Kids Have the Ideas - AudioHERE/Video COMING

TruthToTell has a policy of presenting programs that address the persistent problems of racism and poverty in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Those two social cancers combine to deprive huge groups of our neighbors from adequate food, housing, education and the other basic needs we all take for granted. Among the topics we’ve covered are race and discrimination in the classrooms around here, something we wish would simply disappear, but, according to UofM’s Institute on Law and Poverty, has become exponentially worse over the last several decades. All this, despite the lip service politicians give to efforts to desegregate and improve our schools.

It looks like it may be up to the children to help where we adults have failed
The Saint Paul Foundationits Facing Race Initiative, and the joint initiative for face-to-face civic engagement efforts known as InCommons have joined in one project with a competition for relative modest grants challenging organizations and individuals in reducing racism in their communities. The kids won out. And we’ll talk to representatives of the two winners about their plans and projects. Let’s meet the winners:

1. Project s.t.a.r.t. Leadership – Submitted by longtime schools advocate and activist Kate Towle of Minneapolis Idea Generator and Paul Robinson of Wilder Foundation.

  Kate Towle and Paul Robinson will apply the $2,500 Facing Race grant to support curriculum development, outreach and the ongoing work of Project s.t.a.r.t. Leadership – a youth-driven initiative that engages Minneapolis Public School students as leaders in racial equity work.

 “The heart of Project s.t.a.r.t. is that we can’t just rely on the adults in our schools to create the environment we want,” says Towle. “We have to engage students in making our schools safe, respectful and culturally-competent.” Towle, a Hamline University alumna, is an active racial justice facilitator who volunteers for the YWCA and consults with the Minneapolis Public Schools... s.t.a.r.t., named and created by students at South High School, stands for “students together against racial tension.”

2. Youth Peacekeepers – Submitted by Jake Branchaud-Linsk of Saint Paul.

 Jake Branchaud-Linsk, a philosophy and political science major at Hamline University, will use his grant to provide conflict resolution and communication training to groups of diverse high school students for use in facilitating conversations about race with younger peer groups. The inspiration for his idea came from his youth engagement work at the Dispute Resolution Center in Saint Paul, made possible by a Phillips Family Foundation scholarship. “I want to help youth apply good communication and mediation skills to discussions about race,” says Branchaud-Linsk. “Working with youth on this topic is exciting because we can make an early impact. They have their whole lives ahead of them to use the skills they’ll acquire through Youth Peacekeepers.”

Now, we’ll let the young people talk about doing something about this clinging issue. Thanks to Saint Paul Foundation’s Rowzat Shipchandler and Laura Mylan for helping us structure this show. 

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI lead the discussion with these committed young folks and 

 Rowzat Shipchandler

First Person Radio-Weds, Jul 27 at 9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org; TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government-AUDIO BELOW

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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First Person Radio-Weds,Jul 27@9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with AIM Co-founder, Clyde Bellecourt and Photographer Bob Zeller.

 Clyde Bellecourt and Bob Zeller have joined together to tell the story of the American Indian Movement's roots in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Indian community. Zeller began storytelling in video, audio, and photography after leaving Augsburg College in 1967. He taught film appreciation and coached debate. He chose to "drop out" as he puts it to "drop in" to the peace movement of the 1960s, whose Beat roots he found compelling.

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TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - AUDIO HERE

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

GUESTS:

REP. MINDY GREILING – DFL Lead, House Education Finance Committee

MIKE DEAN – President, CommonCause/Minnesota

RICH NEUMEISTER – longtime public interest citizen lobbyist and award-winning open government activist and blogger

It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

Worse, the Capitol itself was locked down to citizens and visitors. And just as disturbing was the absence of citizens and visitors knocking on those doors to get a look at the resulting process and package.

Secrecy is a public leprosy eroding public confidence in government more deeply than even the normal frustrations we feel with the occasional snail’s pace of bureaucracy and the unjustified decisions government agencies can impose. Secrecy is infecting every corner of government, leaving the public out in the cold to participate in and understand the agreement, bills, laws, rules and regulations – not to mention the unspoken barriers to access thrown up to citizens and the media by lawmakers and agency officials alike.

Crisis management reared its ugly head again earlier this last week when the bills written in the dark by Mr. Dayton and the GOP and presented to the full House and Senate under cover of speed and secrecy were barely seen even by those whose job it is to vote on these matters, let alone analyze them for their effect on constituents. Why the rush? Of course, 22,000 state employees, not to mention constituents were clamoring for a restart of state government.

CommonCause/Minnesota worked to ensure at least a 72-hour deliberation and study period for the bills submitted and passed without a moment’s discussion or a single amendment allowed during the Special Session Gov. Dayton called. Of course, the three-day period was rejected on the grounds that – Naomi, are you listening? – it would prolong the already protracted state government shutdown. Crisis decision-making at its finest. Skip the details. Pass the bills, open the doors and get those workers back on the job. What more could they have done? Plenty.

Two DFL legislators – Rep. Mindy Greiling and Sen. John Marty – have introduced bills that would require open processes in all legislative work, but primarily all budget negotiations between and among legislative leaders and even between those leaders and the governor.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with open government advocates (are there any real secrecy defenders out there?) and examine the trend toward increasing secrecy in all aspects of public governance and media coverages.

First Person Radio-July 27: CLYDE BELLECOURT and BOB ZELLER:Recording AIM's Twin Cities Roots-AUDIO HERE

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/27/2011

Audio is up on First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock's and Andy Driscoll's conversation with AIM Co-founder, Clyde Bellecourt and Photographer Bob Zeller.

Clyde Bellecourt's telling the story of AIM's founding and its subsequent Wounded Knee confrontation with every federal law enforcement agency, not to mention all four military branches, was a chilling tale of the extent to the government has been willing to go to keep "upstart" Indians in their places. This and other stories of the volatile 60s and 70s will all appear in Bob Zeller's chronicle of  the counterculture years in in MInnesota and around the country. Stay tuned for more of this work's revelations and oral histories through CivicMedia's auspices.

Clyde Bellecourt and Bob Zeller have joined together to tell the story of the American Indian Movement's roots in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Indian community.

Zeller began storytelling in video, audio, and photography after leaving Augsburg College in 1967. He taught film appreciation and coached debate. He chose to "drop out" as he puts it to "drop in" to the peace movement of the 1960s, whose Beat roots he found compelling.


53:59 minutes (49.43 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.orgFirst Person Radio Weds July 13 @9AM: DR. CHRIS MATO NUNPA: Author and Dakota Treaty Expert;

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

We’re living through an era where the notion of the common good has been overwhelmed by the idea of individualism; me and mine. This is manifested on many fronts. One of the most dramatic is this worship of the Constitution as a charter of limited government. We’re also witnessing the denigration of the public sphere and the selling of privatization as the remedy.

John Ritter

Dane Smith’s recent op-ed argues that the Federalists argued for ratification of the constitution because they believed that a strong national government was necessary to promote the common welfare. His work with Growth&Justice is predicated on the idea and the historic reality that government can and must play a strong role in achieving the public good.

Doug Rossinow will provide an historical perspective on this fundamental debate in America on contrasting ideas about the meaning of freedom. He teaches courses on the New Deal, Civil Rights and Reagan eras (among other things) — eras where these contrasting ideas (and practices) were in sharp conflict. His most recent book is Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

How can people be lured out of their self-imposed isolation – either technological or ideological – and see the value of working together toward the common good? How do you engage people, spurring both action on specific issues and reflection on the underlying values those actions represent? ISAIAH’s Doran Schrantz  will help answer those questions.

Guest Host PROFESSOR TOM O'CONNELL of Metropolitan State University and Board Chair of CivicMedia/Minnesota will ask these questions of his guests:

DANE SMITH – Veteran journalist and Executive Director of Growth & Justice, a progressive think tank dedicated to making Minnesota more prosperous and fair.

DOUG ROSSINOW – Professor of History at Metropolitan State University and author of Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

DORAN SCHRANTZ – Executive Director of ISAIAH, a congregation-based organization that engages Minnesotans of faith on issues of economic and racial justice.

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First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO HERE

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.

First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/13/2011

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.


56:38 minutes (51.85 MB)