light rail

warning: Parameter 2 to onepixelout_swftools_flashvars() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/langmul/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 476.

A New Challenge to Southwest LRT

On-air date: 
Sun, 08/17/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

A lawsuit has been filed by the Lakes and Parks Alliance of Minneapolis, alleging that the SWLRT does not comply with state law. The lawsuit is addressed to the mayor and the City Council, and also to the Federal Transit Administration (Chicago) and to the Compliance Office of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) at the office of the US Environmental Protection Agency (Chicago), stating that there was a failure to perform an environmental review by SWLRT.  Some groups believe that the environmental concerns have been satisfied and that the risks to the environment are minor by comparison to the benefits it will bring to the Twin Cities.  While many residents of Minneapolis don’t have a problem with the new system, many have a problem with the process by which the decisions have been made.

Join TTT co-hosts Siobhan Kierans and Tom O’Connell as they discuss this contentious issue with Pastor Paul Slack (ISAIAH and a member of the People’s Transit Coalition), Judy Meath & Mary Pattock (LRT Done Right), Stuart Chazin (Lakes Park Alliance), Susu Jeffrey (Friends of Coldwater) and Anthony Newby (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change).

 

Call and join the conversation at 612/341-0980 or post on Truth To Tell's Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 TO HELP TTT HERE!

TruthToTell: Community Connections- Bottineau: Coming or Going?

This is the first edition of the TruthToTell: Community Connections series, a 12 episode series of special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

TTT Feb 7-9AM: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember - join the conversation: 612-341-0980.

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave.through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - CEO, Bywater Business Solutions; Chair, Community Agreement Committee, Central Corridor; Chair,Business Resource Collaborative

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL ADVISERS and LINKS:

Veronica Burt – Policy Advocate/Cultural Rondo Community

•Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AUDIO HERE: First Person Radio: Feb 2: CORINE FAIRBANKS: AIM's Work in California

me_nov_2010.jpgCorine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

 


Corine Fairbanks is Oglala Lakota and is the Director of Development for the American Indian Movement Santa Barbara Chapter.  Fairbanks has been involved in social, cultural, and political organizing for most of her life, having first been involved with the American Indian Movement in 1986. She is a dedicated and proud employee of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County and in her few spare moments she is also involved with the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate Santa Barbara chapter.  Her greatest achievements have been, "the mother of four wonderful and very cool souls: my children are my motivation, inspiration and my reward for everything I do".


Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Corine about the strange things going on in California.

TruthToTell Feb 7: CENTRAL CORRIDOR: Lingering Issues - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 02/07/2011

The 11-mile ribbon of rail that will wend its way through downtown St. Paul and out past the Capitol on University Ave. through the University of Minnesota campus and hook up with the Hiawatha line near the Humphrey Dome has actually been under construction for some time, especially in downtown St. Paul. Streets on which the Central Corridor light rail cars will run have been altered and utilities moved to accommodate tracks end at the art deco Depot and beyond to the repair and storage facility across from the Farmer’s Market.

Still, consternation reigns all along the line and in the communities about the disruption the light rail project will impose on residents, small businesses and future development sure to follow. African-American advocates, in particular, their memories not yet faded from the cleaving ditch that I-94 represented over 40 years ago, carving their once-cohesive Rondo community enclave in half, have tried to either stop or force changes in the light rail plan to accommodate their concerns. Among those worries, at least initially, were those involving the number of stops along University, originally a mile apart and forcing a transit dependent community to walk at least a half-mile to those planned stops.

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for managing this project, although many agencies and levels of government are part of its construction and financing. The Council, then chaired by Pawlenty appointee, Peter Bell, balked at the idea of shortening the distance between stops before being pushed to find the money for them. Those same African-Americans filed a lawsuit on Federal District Court, in essence shaking their collective fists over the attitude and neglect the Corridor’s Management Committee was showing in its decision-making, even as it responded favorably to Minnesota Public Radio’s demands for a quieter, smoother train past its building. It didn’t add up.

Last week, Federal District Judge Donovan Frank ruled that, while he found it true that the Met Council had behaved badly in responding to community concerns – essentially running roughshod over people of color, he would not halt the project as the plaintiffs had requested. That was a given.

Now what? What will be the fallout of that suit? Will plaintiffs appeal? Or move on and make the best of the inevitable? Other very obvious questions is what the Central Corridor will look like and how well it will serve the communities around it as well as the small businesses along the avenue afraid of suffering a drop in patronage, even shutdowns. Can accommodations be made for the many Asian entrepreneurs – the stores and restaurants serving thousands daily right now – to mitigate the potential losses if people can’t get to them when streets are torn up?

How about future development? Will new housing sure to be built be affordable? Will property taxes remain stable in light of the inevitable rise in property values that come with such massive projects? One thing is sure: dozens of coalitions, consortia, task forces, committees and collaboratives have formed and themselves coalesced to address just about any concern that could arise. But not all players are so certain that community interests will be met.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and LYNNELL MICKELSEN talk with several key players – certainly not all – in updating you and us on the Central Corridor’s latest milestones on its way to a 2014 completion.

GUESTS:

Nieeta Presley, President, Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation

Jim Erkel – Attorney, Land Use and Transportation Program Director, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

•Chris Ferguson - Chair, Central Corridor Business Resource CollaborativeCEO, Bywater Business Solutions

Tim Thompson – President, Housing Preservation Project

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Discover Central Corridor

February 17 - 8:00-10:00 AM and 6:00-8:00 PM: Public Commentary hearing on Lawsuit Ruling - Brownstone Bldg., 849 University Ave, St. Paul.


58:20 minutes (26.7 MB)