Metropolitan Council

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TruthToTell Monday, June 23- 9AM: MINNESOTA ORCHESTRA TODAY: New Life for the World-Class Ensemble; TruthToTell Monday, June 16: ENCORE: TRANSIT EQUITY: Riders and Residents Deserve

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 23, 2014

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Today is something of departure from our usual public affairs focus to catch up with one of Minnesota’s critical cultural institutions – The Minnesota Orchestra. It’s actually back with a vengeance after nearly two years of roiled relationships between the Orchestral Association and its musicians. This group of extraordinary talents found itself confronted by the take-it-or-leave it offer during negotiations of a 32% cut in their pay, among other items, or face a lockout. The predictable outcome was to reject the offer. All music activity ceased.

Lockouts have increasingly used by management of all sorts of industries, but to counter strikes by union employees. The public simply was caught unaware that this could happen to a revered bunch of professionals like the 95 tuxedoed classical musicians. The management – Michael Henson and the board chair at the time, Jon Campbell, wanted to pare the orchestra’s size – significant, according to the members, to maintain the high quality of musicianship.

After 15 months of a very painful lockout during which the world class conductor, Osmo Vänskä, resigned when a Carnegie Hall concert long scheduled had to cancel. Last straw for Vänskä, so he moved to the sideline, but not too far. He conducted several concerts staged by the Musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra in a few local venues, joined by well-known concert soloists like pianist Emanuel Ax. Other former music directors came “home” to lead the ensemble in other concerts - Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Edo de Waart and Eiji Oue.

Finally, the swords were sheathed enough to come to agreement and the lockout ended January 14th.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS will talk with three men intimately in the Orchestra’s operation, negotiations, performing and reporting on it all. Then, we’ll hear selections from the Grammy-winning recording of the Jean Sibelius’ symphonies, and a treat – some live cello from Tony Ross, and the amazing season now planned.

GUESTS:

TONY ROSS - Principal Cellist, Minnesota Orchestra and part of the musicians’ negotiating team.

KEVIN SMITH - formerly President of the Minnesota Opera, will serve as interim President and CEO, following Michael Henson’s August 31 departure until a permanent successor is identified.

MICHAEL ANTHONY – Long-time StarTribune Minnesota Orchestra critic, reviewer and observer, now a Minneapolis-based free-lance writer and critic.

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, June 16, 2014

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This last weekend the Green Line (Central Corridor) started rolling for its inaugural trip along the 11 miles connected downtown St. Paul and Minneapolis, to the so-called “Target Central” station, where most of the rail systems serving the Cities and the region hereabouts will ultimately converge  and become the Metro region’s transit hub and even an entertainment venue (presumably to keep. Keeping our focus on the LRT and other transit equity issues seems apropos in returning to this topic this week.

A whole hell of a lot of angst emerged from the disruptions for small business outlets along University Ave, especially, in St. Paul, most of them owned and operated by entrepreneurs of color.

Equity issues can still be found in most aspects of the design and construction of the Green Line well beyond the impacts on business. New lines are planned to cut through sensitive neighborhoods, but not necessarily ready to serve the equity needs for the new parts of North Minneapolis and the entire Southwest Corridor stretching to Eden Prairie. Some of the issues rearing their heads again, many new ones have highlighted the uniqueness of each project – how does the Northwest-bound Bottineau Light Rail Transitway (Blue Line extension) actually serve the nerve center of the North Side’s African-American community. The natural corridor, Broadway Ave, weaves through already distressed neighborhoods, too narrow without the capacity to carry a standard light rail system. Smaller-gauge rails – like those of streetcars – would fit. Is that a solution to fair and equitable access to transit for Northsiders. Riders there could connect to the Bottineau via streetcar. But what other issues confront these folks?

Then, not far from the Bottineau, the Southwest Light Rail system (Green Line)planned through the near-North Harrison neighborhood before swinging Southwest through five cities – Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Hopkins, Minnetonka and Eden Prairie. The battle lines here have been complicated by the role older freight rails and the alignment through the Cedar Lake complex of lakes, bike and hiking trails.

Southwest will be covered as the Metropolitan Council, the Minneapolis City Counciland the City of St. Louis Park where well-heeled West Minneapolitans and St. Louis Parkers are demanding their amenities of one sort or another be preserved as they see it. Some of the issues have been partially resolved, but where does the equity play out in this scenario selecting the routes for those segments of the SWLRT.

This time out, we’ll explore the equity issues for the two lines on the west of the city and its suburban sisters and North Side under serious debate and organizing around them along their respective corridors.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS talk with the active organizers directing their efforts to ensure equity and neighborhood concerns are addressed.

GUESTS:

RUSS ADAMS – Executive Director, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability


KENNEDY WILLIS – Executive Director, Harrison Neighborhood Association, Mpls.

 

 


MICHAEL MCDOWELL – Transit Organizer, NOC (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change)

AASIM SHABAZZ – Co-Chair, Blue Line (Bottineau Transitway) Coalition (North Side)


 

TruthToTell Monday, June 16- 9AM: ENCORE: TRANSIT EQUITY: Riders and Residents Deserve Equal Transit Service - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7; Streaming @ KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Mon, 06/16/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This last weekend the Green Line (Central Corridor) started rolling for its inaugural trip along the 11 miles connected downtown St. Paul and Minneapolis, to the so-called “Target Central” station, where most of the rail systems serving the Cities and the region hereabouts will ultimately converge  and become the Metro region’s transit hub and even an entertainment venue (presumably to keep. Keeping our focus on the LRT and other transit equity issues seems apropos in returning to this topic this week.

A whole hell of a lot of angst emerged from the disruptions for small business outlets along University Ave, especially, in St. Paul, most of them owned and operated by entrepreneurs of color.

Equity issues can still be found in most aspects of the design and construction of the Green Line well beyond the impacts on business. New lines are planned to cut through sensitive neighborhoods, but not necessarily ready to serve the equity needs for the new parts of North Minneapolis and the entire Southwest Corridor stretching to Eden Prairie. Some of the issues rearing their heads again, many new ones have highlighted the uniqueness of each project – how does the Northwest-bound Bottineau Light Rail Transitway (Blue Line extension) actually serve the nerve center of the North Side’s African-American community. The natural corridor, Broadway Ave, weaves through already distressed neighborhoods, too narrow without the capacity to carry a standard light rail system. Smaller-gauge rails – like those of streetcars – would fit. Is that a solution to fair and equitable access to transit for Northsiders. Riders there could connect to the Bottineau via streetcar. But what other issues confront these folks?

Then, not far from the Bottineau, the Southwest Light Rail system (Green Line) planned through the near-North Harrison neighborhood before swinging Southwest through five cities – Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Hopkins, Minnetonka and Eden Prairie. The battle lines here have been complicated by the role older freight rails and the alignment through the Cedar Lake complex of lakes, bike and hiking trails.

Southwest will be covered as the Metropolitan Council, the Minneapolis City Council and the City of St. Louis Park where well-heeled West Minneapolitans and St. Louis Parkers are demanding their amenities of one sort or another be preserved as they see it. Some of the issues have been partially resolved, but where does the equity play out in this scenario selecting the routes for those segments of the SWLRT.

This time out, we’ll explore the equity issues for the two lines on the west of the city and its suburban sisters and North Side under serious debate and organizing around them along their respective corridors.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS talk with the active organizers directing their efforts to ensure equity and neighborhood concerns are addressed.

GUESTS:

RUSS ADAMS – Executive Director, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability


KENNEDY WILLIS – Executive Director, Harrison Neighborhood Association, Mpls.

 

 


MICHAEL MCDOWELL – Transit Organizer, NOC (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change)

AASIM SHABAZZ – Co-Chair, Blue Line (Bottineau Transitway) Coalition (North Side)


TruthToTell Monday, May 19- 9AM: TRANSIT EQUITY: Riders and Residents Deserve Full Service; TruthToTell Monday, May 12: ENCORE: From Minnesota to the Horn of Africa: Connections to the Past & Future - AUDIO HERE!

  1. UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, May 19, 2014

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page. 

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Less than four weeks out from the launch of the Green Line (Central Corridor), on the heels of opening the so-called “Target Central” station, where will ultimately converge all of the rail systems serving Minnesota and the region hereabouts and become the region’s transit hub and even an entertainment venue (presumably to keep  .

A whole hell of a lot of angst emerged from the disruptions for small business outlets along University Ave, especially, in St. Paul, most of them owned and operated by entrepreneurs of color.

Equity issues could be found in most aspects of the design and construction of the Green Line well beyond the impacts on business. For many residents living along this corridor, memories of the historic inequity visited on the central city of St. Paul dating back to first major divisive swath of freeway – I-94 – cutting through all many of the properties and the folks living around there remember Rondo. For the older folks displaced or friends and family of those going through the prime example of trampling on residents and businesses back now loomed large as they envisioned the Central Corridor wiping out another predominantly community of color in the same general vicinity.

Now, new lines are planned to cut through sensitive neighborhoods, but not necessarily ready to serve the equity needs for the new parts of North Minneapolis and the entire Southwest Corridor stretching to Eden Prairie. Some of the issues rearing their heads again, many new ones have highlighted the uniqueness of each project – how does the Northwest-bound Bottineau Light Rail Transitway (Blue Line extension) actually serve the nerve center of the North Side’s African-American community. The natural corridor, Broadway Ave, weaves through already distressed neighborhoods, too narrow without the capacity to carry a standard light rail system. Smaller-gauge rails – like those of streetcars – would fit. Is that a solution to fair and equitable access to transit for Northsiders. Riders there could connect to the Bottineau via streetcar. But what other issues confront these folks?

Then, not far from the Bottineau, the Southwest Light Rail system (Green Line)planned through the near-North Harrison neighborhood before swinging Southwest through five cities – Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Hopkins, Minnetonka and Eden Prairie. The battle lines here have been complicated by the role older freight rails and the alignment through the Cedar Lake complex of lakes, bike and hiking trails.

Southwest has been covered well as the Metropolitan Council, the Minneapolis City Council and the City of St. Louis Park where well-heeled West Minneapolitans and St. Louis Parkers are demanding their amenities of one sort or another be preserved as they see it. Some of the issues have been partially resolved, but where does the equity play out in this scenario selecting the routes for those segments of the SWLRT.

This time out, we’ll explore the equity issues for the two lines on the west of the city and its suburban sisters and North Side under serious debate and organizing around them along their respective corridors.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS talk with the active organizers directing their efforts to ensure equity and neighborhood concerns are addressed.

GUESTS:

RUSS ADAMS – Executive Director, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability


KENNEDY WILLIS – Executive Director, Harrison Neighborhood Association, Mpls.

 

 


MICHAEL MCDOWELL – Transit Organizer, NOC (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change)

LARRY HISCOCK – Program Officer, Transit-Way Engagement, Nexus Community Partners

 

 


AND YOU! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, May 12, 2014

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Local Somali and East African communities are fighting poverty, educating kids and promoting peace and development in the Horn of Africa as well as in their “new” US communities.

Ask your neighbor about the Somali Diaspora in Minnesota, and she is likely to tell you about the pirates in the academy awarded nominated film, Captain Phillips, young El Shabab recruits, and growing Somali power in local politics. Less understood is the major contribution Somalis and other East Africans make to their countries of origin. From the individual financial contributions that serve as a life line for relatives back home, to disaster relief and hunger alleviation, to an increasingly sophisticated range of education and development efforts, Minnesota’s East African community is making a difference.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and Guest Host, TOM O’CONNELL will be joined by three guests who are deeply familiar with these efforts.

GUESTS:

ABDURASHID ALI – Director of Somali Family Services, a Twin Cities based nonprofit with extensive programs in Puntland, Somalia. Beginning with the construction of Puntland’s first library and resource center, SFS has organized a series of impressive initiatives aimed at building a peaceful, democratic, and just Somalia.

 

JAYLANI HUSSEIN – Board Secretary, American Relief Agency For the Horn of Africa (ARAHA); Lead Consultant, Zeila Consultants; Planner, MN Department of Agriculture. Mr. Hussein has traveled the Horn of Africa on number of times on behalf of ARAHA – to open a regional field office as well as to oversee large‐scale humanitarian projects in the Somali Famine of 2011. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Community Development/City Planning and is currently pursuing a law degree.

AWO AHMED – Literacy Program Coordinator, Metropolitan State University. Awo plans to do graduate work in global health and use her knowledge to work with her father, who directs a health clinic in Lasbas, Somalia.

 

TruthToTell Monday, May 19- 9AM: TRANSIT EQUITY: Riders and Residents Deserve Full Service - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7; Streaming @ KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Mon, 05/19/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Less than four weeks out from the launch of the Green Line (Central Corridor), on the heels of opening the so-called “Target Central” station, where will ultimately converge all of the rail systems serving Minnesota and the region hereabouts and become the region’s transit hub and even an entertainment venue (presumably to keep  .

A whole hell of a lot of angst emerged from the disruptions for small business outlets along University Ave, especially, in St. Paul, most of them owned and operated by entrepreneurs of color.

Equity issues could be found in most aspects of the design and construction of the Green Line well beyond the impacts on business. For many residents living along this corridor, memories of the historic inequity visited on the central city of St. Paul dating back to first major divisive swath of freeway – I-94 – cutting through all many of the properties and the folks living around there remember Rondo. For the older folks displaced or friends and family of those going through the prime example of trampling on residents and businesses back now loomed large as they envisioned the Central Corridor wiping out another predominantly community of color in the same general vicinity.

Now, new lines are planned to cut through sensitive neighborhoods, but not necessarily ready to serve the equity needs for the new parts of North Minneapolis and the entire Southwest Corridor stretching to Eden Prairie. Some of the issues rearing their heads again, many new ones have highlighted the uniqueness of each project – how does the Northwest-bound Bottineau Light Rail Transitway (Blue Line extension) actually serve the nerve center of the North Side’s African-American community. The natural corridor, Broadway Ave, weaves through already distressed neighborhoods, too narrow without the capacity to carry a standard light rail system. Smaller-gauge rails – like those of streetcars – would fit. Is that a solution to fair and equitable access to transit for Northsiders. Riders there could connect to the Bottineau via streetcar. But what other issues confront these folks?

Then, not far from the Bottineau, the Southwest Light Rail system (Green Line) planned through the near-North Harrison neighborhood before swinging Southwest through five cities – Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Hopkins, Minnetonka and Eden Prairie. The battle lines here have been complicated by the role older freight rails and the alignment through the Cedar Lake complex of lakes, bike and hiking trails.

Southwest has been covered well as the Metropolitan Council, the Minneapolis City Council and the City of St. Louis Park where well-heeled West Minneapolitans and St. Louis Parkers are demanding their amenities of one sort or another be preserved as they see it. Some of the issues have been partially resolved, but where does the equity play out in this scenario selecting the routes for those segments of the SWLRT.

This time out, we’ll explore the equity issues for the two lines on the west of the city and its suburban sisters and North Side under serious debate and organizing around them along their respective corridors.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and SIOBHAN KIERANS talk with the active organizers directing their efforts to ensure equity and neighborhood concerns are addressed.

GUESTS:

RUSS ADAMS – Executive Director, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability


KENNEDY WILLIS – Executive Director, Harrison Neighborhood Association, Mpls.

 

 


MICHAEL MCDOWELL – Transit Organizer, NOC (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change)

AASIM SHABAZZ – Co-Chair, Blue Line (Bottineau Transitway) Coalition (North Side)


TruthToTell, Monday, April 8 - 9AM: MINNESOTA'S DREAM: Schooling and Driving without Deportation; TruthToTell, Monday, April 1 - 9AM: REPEAT SPECIAL: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going

UPCOMING SHOW

HEY! It’s SPRING MEMBERSHIP DRIVE TIME at KFAI – a perfect opportunity to show your support for BOTH KFAI – the Mother Ship for TruthToTell – ANDTruthToTell itself.

This year it’s a BIG DEAL! Why? Because the Mother Ship has so much in the offing to make your radio listening and grassroots participation in our Community-Based Independent Public Radio station 1,000 times better!! We’ll sound better and have much better equipment – with YOUR HELP.

Call us NOW and during TTT Monday at 612-375-9030 to pledge your support to this 35-year-old membership-driven, volunteer –driven community asset! 612-375-9030 – OR – PLEDGE at KFAI.org. – AND – Come on down or over to KFAI and volunteer to answer phones. That info is also available online.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, April 8, 2013

THEN: Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It’s possible that 2012’s Election results have significantly changed the climate for immigration reform across the US. Last June, President Obama has issued anExecutive Order allowing children of undocumented workers a great deal of leeway toward seeking education and serving in the military without fear of deportation.

Nevertheless, some barriers remain to making certain standards apply to those same young people and their parents when it comes to paying in-state or resident tuition rates and applying for and receiving drivers’ licenses not only in Minnesota, but many other states. This makes life uncertain for many of those aspiring new Americans in going from state to state or changing residence. One of the worst is surely the inability of Minnesota’s college-bound undocumented high-schoolers and adults the least expensive tuition rates possible.

For children living here to pay out-of-state or nonresident tuition, which can double and triple their cost of post-secondary education seems idiotic on its face. But the anti-immigrant, anti-undocumented fervor among certain blocs of legislators and voters that dictated the tougher stance in earlier years, despite the contributions those same workers make to the comfort of us all, not to mention the taxes they pay, may be melting under the  heat of the last election, including the shifting majorities in the Minnesota Legislature.

Bills in both houses to relieve such young people and their parents from facing those previous barriers to full resident privileges are wending their way through relevant committees, each sponsored by core constituent representative and senators and backed by a wide range of business and advocacy groups, and guided by several spokespeople, including our guests this week.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with those advocates and at least one sponsor of one of those bills about just what those new laws would allow, if passed.

GUESTS:

SEN. SANDY PAPPAS – President of the Minnesota Senate and Chair, State and Local Government Committee; Author of Senate File 723 (MN Dream Act), (co-sponsored by Sens.Torres Ray, Cohen, Franzen and Hayden; House Companion, HF875, Authored by Rep. Carlos Mariani and a bi-partisan list of co-sponsors).*


 

FRANCISCO SEGOVIA – Director, Waite House of Pillsbury United Communities

NESTOR GOMEZ – DEEP Youth Organizer, Tamales y Bicicletas (Food & Environmental Justice advocacy)

 

*Drivers’ License (Licencias para Todos – Licenses for All) bills HF348 and SF271 can also be found online.

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, April 1, 2013

NOTE: This IS A REPEAT of our Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

AUDIO HERE and below. VIDEO HERE

Television Repeats - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

TruthToTell, Monday, April 1 - 9AM: REPEAT SPECIAL: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - Audio Below & Video Archived

On-air date: 
Mon, 04/01/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

NOTE: This IS A REPEAT of our Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

AUDIO HERE and below. VIDEO HERE

Television Repeats - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

DATE CORRECTION and LINKS REPAIR: TruthToTell, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - Audio Below & Video Archived

UPCOMING SHOW

SO SORRY FOR THE REPEAT NEWSLETTERS, BUT THE CORRECT DATES AND LINKS NEEDED REPAIR. AND NOW WE HAVE LAST WEEK'S VIDEO UP!!!

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota

 

 


RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, February 18, 2013

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

AUDIO HERE and below. VIDEO HERE

Television Repeats - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

CORRECTION: TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - Audio Below & Video Archived

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

 

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

Look for Repeat telecasts - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part of NRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM – Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

DATE CORRECTION: TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 25 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Feb. 18: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - AUDIO HERE & VIDEO Coming

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

 

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

Look for Repeat telecasts - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist

 

 

 

 

TruthToTell, Monday, Feb. 18 - 9AM: WOMEN in the CONSTRUCTION TRADES: Still Struggling After All These Years; TruthToTell, Feb. 18: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS I: Bottineau: Coming or Going - AUDIO HERE & VIDEO Coming

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One entire section of Susan Eisenberg’s “Move the Decimal Point” blog poignantly remembers the names and stories of the many women who have died on the jobs they held in construction and related trades.

Eisenberg, a prominent Boston writer, poet, teacher and artist who was herself a tradeswoman, authored a breakthrough book of moving profiles relates the discouraging and dangerous encounters too many women have had struggling with threatened and threatening men for equality of position, pay and pride, and yes, power, in those traditionally male bastions of carpentry, electricity, plumbing, welding, labor, etc. – that is, all the many crafts that make up the construction trades.

The book, We’ll Call You If We Need You, published in 1999, is the natural outgrowth of Eisenberg’s own dilemmas as she grew from apprentice in 1978 to journeyman electrician and navigated the same rough waters as the women she writes about – and in some cases has had to mourn. A book of emotional poetry later reflected on the tales. Since then, she’s taken the stories on the road in a multimedia exhibit – “On Equal Terms” – a more visual assemblage representing those experiences.

As she and others joining us will tell you, all is still not tongue-in-groove joins of tradesmen and the women wanting to do the same work and, when given a chance, often more skilled and competent at their craft. In many cases, the men just cannot buy what they see as an intrusion into their realm.

What are the experiences of women in the trades today? Are the opportunities more prolific? Safer? More equal? Who’s working to overcome the barriers that still block many women from successfully entering the trades and working the wood and the wire, the beams and the pipes? Is this whole business a little like the deeply entrenched social issues that keep us divided, only plagued with even more gatekeeping of the union standard?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with author/artist Eisenberg as well as other tradeswomen past and present, one of whom is an independent contractor and a PhD candidate in Housing, no less.

GUESTS:

SUSAN EISENBERG – Tradeswoman Pioneer, Multidisciplinary Artist and Policy Consultant; Director, “On Equal Terms Project” – Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center; Poet & Author, We’ll Call You If We Need You; Blogger: Move the Decimal Point.

HEIDI WAGNER – Owner, Heidi Construction; PhD Candidate in Housing Studies-University of Minnesota


 

RASHEDA PETTIFORD – Apprentice, Laborers Local 563, Minneapolis

MARY DESJARLAIS – MN Department of Labor & Industry Apprenticeship Program

 

 


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

 

NOTE: This Special TruthToTell: Community Connections program can be seen and/or heard on the following:

Look for Repeat telecasts - SPNN Cable Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

Listeners to Niijii Radio/KKWE - White Earth: check TruthToTell's schedule of programs airing at 6:00PM Mondays following Democracy NOW!

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

This week we begin a year-long series of monthly special TruthToTell programs looking at key issues facing various communities around the Twin Cities Metro and across Minnesota.

We’re calling it Community Connections – and the whole idea is to bring conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native issues, youth and so on, into the communities across Minnesota where folks facing those issues can be a real part of them. We bring in a live and engaged audience each month to be an integral part of our examining those issues.

The series is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has allowed TruthToTell to partner with KFAI and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. The programs are recorded live for presentation beginning the following Monday – in our regular TruthToTell slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI and at 8:00 PM on television in St. Paul on SPNN’s Community Cable Channel 19 and Minneapolis Telecommunications Network (MTN) Channel 16. When possible, we will air live on KFAI on the Second Wednesday evening of some of those months. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for which ones we’re able to air live.

This month, we explore the issues arising from a plan to put a light rail line along what’s being called the Bottineau Transitway, starting in downtown Minneapolis and running through or around the North Side and out to Brooklyn Park. We gathered in the meeting rooms of the Minneapolis Urban League on the North Side of Minneapolis. We want to thank the Urban League as well as the Alliance for Metropolitan Stability (Russ Adams, Joan Vanhala and Ebony Adedayo), our true community partner on this issue – and perhaps others later. AMS will remain on top of regional transit issues throughout their development.

Bottineau will be among the last light rail corridors built, if it can get the necessary funding – and, as with so many other public issues, this line will serve communities of color in the main. Those communities, including North Minneapolis, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, especially the urban core, have watched their critical transit needs go unmet – and even existing ones cut back when others around the Metro were not. This means Bottineau represents a serious public investment in transit-dependent communities, and deserves the same level of fund all the other corridors seem to be receiving from the Feds, the state and local governments. Some other corridors will still have to decide whether they’ll run rails or what’s called bus rapid transit – a sort of souped-up bus to run at in its own lanes and at higher speeds.

This first conversation featured four outstanding contributors to the discussion from both relevant public agencies and some of the communities along this corridor to the northwest from Target Field.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI guide this conversation with our guests:

KENYA MCKNIGHT – Northside Transportation Network (part ofNRRC), member of the Metropolitan Council’s Transportation Advisory Board and a Bush Leadership Fellow

STATE SENATOR BOBBY JOE CHAMPION,  (DFL-Minneapolis Dist. 59); Vice Chair, Senate Finance Committee; Member of Transportation Finance and Policy Divisions

 

 

GARY CUNNINGHAM –Metropolitan Council member; Vice President, Northwest Area Foundation; former head of Hennepin County African American Men Project 

WYNFRED RUSSELL, Brooklyn Park – Executive Director, African Career, Education and Resource, Inc.; Liberian Community activist