Minnesota legislature

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A Local Race With Historic Implications: Who Will Represent Residents of House District 60B

On-air date: 
Mon, 01/11/2016
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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In 1972, Phyllis Kahn made history when she was elected state representative as part of a feminist wave that put an end to what had been a male monopoly in the Minnesota Legislature. Four decades later, two challengers are seeking to make some history of their own. Community leaders Mohamud Noor and Ilhan Omar, both DFLers, are also running for the 60B seat. If elected, one of them would become Minnesota’s first Somali legislator. 

 A conversation with Representative Phyllis Kahn and challengers Ilhan Omar and Mohamud Noor (invited) on TruthtoTell, Monday morning, January 11, 9-10, KFAI Radio, 90.3 Minneapolis or 106.7 St. Paul.  You can live stream at www.kfai.org or catch it later on the KFAI archive.  Click ON DEMAND and search for TruthtoTell.   

Citizen Lobbies: Three Perspectives on Critical Issues at the Minnesota Legislature

On-air date: 
Sun, 04/12/2015

From bridges to bicycle paths; poverty prevention to river protection, citizen organizations are once again hard at work at the Minnesota Legislature.  Join TruthtoTell co-hosts Tom O’Connell and Lisa Bryant as they discuss a range of critical legislative issues with staff from three of Minnesota’s most impressive citizen lobby efforts:

Bethany Winkels, field coordinator, Move Minnesota   www.movemn.org

Brian Rusche, executive director, Joint Religious Legislative Task Force  www.jrcl.org

Paul Sobocinski, policy program organizer, Land Stewardship Project  www.landstewardshipproject.org

The Arc of Justice Bends, But in What Direction: Reports From Four Social Justice Campaigns at the Minnesota Legislature

On-air date: 
Sun, 03/29/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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The 2015 legislative session began with hope and a question mark.  After important progressive gains in 2013-2014, voters returned the Minnesota House to Republican control.  Through persistent lobbying and powerful personal testimony, campaigns to restore voting rights to felons and allow Minnesotans access to a driver’s license regardless of immigration status passed the state senate and have won support from many Republican House members where these issues currently hang in the balance.

Meanwhile,  Minnesota home care workers, fresh off their historic organizing campaign of 2014, have bargained the first-ever contract for home health care working in Minnesota and are working hard to secure legislative approval.   And Invest in Minnesota, a broad-based coalition of labor, religious, and community organizations, is back once again to fight for a progressive and fair tax system.

 

First Person Radio-Weds, Jul 27 at 9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org; TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government-AUDIO BELOW

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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First Person Radio-Weds,Jul 27@9AM: CLYDE BELLECOURT/BOB ZELLER:AIM's Twin Cities Roots-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming@ www.KFAI.org

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with AIM Co-founder, Clyde Bellecourt and Photographer Bob Zeller.

 Clyde Bellecourt and Bob Zeller have joined together to tell the story of the American Indian Movement's roots in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Indian community. Zeller began storytelling in video, audio, and photography after leaving Augsburg College in 1967. He taught film appreciation and coached debate. He chose to "drop out" as he puts it to "drop in" to the peace movement of the 1960s, whose Beat roots he found compelling.

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TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - AUDIO HERE

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GUESTS:

REP. MINDY GREILING – DFL Lead, House Education Finance Committee

MIKE DEAN – President, CommonCause/Minnesota

RICH NEUMEISTER – longtime public interest citizen lobbyist and award-winning open government activist and blogger

It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

Worse, the Capitol itself was locked down to citizens and visitors. And just as disturbing was the absence of citizens and visitors knocking on those doors to get a look at the resulting process and package.

Secrecy is a public leprosy eroding public confidence in government more deeply than even the normal frustrations we feel with the occasional snail’s pace of bureaucracy and the unjustified decisions government agencies can impose. Secrecy is infecting every corner of government, leaving the public out in the cold to participate in and understand the agreement, bills, laws, rules and regulations – not to mention the unspoken barriers to access thrown up to citizens and the media by lawmakers and agency officials alike.

Crisis management reared its ugly head again earlier this last week when the bills written in the dark by Mr. Dayton and the GOP and presented to the full House and Senate under cover of speed and secrecy were barely seen even by those whose job it is to vote on these matters, let alone analyze them for their effect on constituents. Why the rush? Of course, 22,000 state employees, not to mention constituents were clamoring for a restart of state government.

CommonCause/Minnesota worked to ensure at least a 72-hour deliberation and study period for the bills submitted and passed without a moment’s discussion or a single amendment allowed during the Special Session Gov. Dayton called. Of course, the three-day period was rejected on the grounds that – Naomi, are you listening? – it would prolong the already protracted state government shutdown. Crisis decision-making at its finest. Skip the details. Pass the bills, open the doors and get those workers back on the job. What more could they have done? Plenty.

Two DFL legislators – Rep. Mindy Greiling and Sen. John Marty – have introduced bills that would require open processes in all legislative work, but primarily all budget negotiations between and among legislative leaders and even between those leaders and the governor.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with open government advocates (are there any real secrecy defenders out there?) and examine the trend toward increasing secrecy in all aspects of public governance and media coverages.

ANDY DRISCOLL: THE SHOCK DOCTRINE OF BUDGET-MAKING

It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

TruthToTell, Mon., July 25 @9AM: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

TruthToTell, Mon., July 25 @9AM: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

Worse, the Capitol itself was locked down to citizens and visitors. And just as disturbing was the absence of citizens and visitors knocking on those doors to get a look at the resulting process and package.

Secrecy is a public leprosy eroding public confidence in government more deeply than even the normal frustrations we feel with the occasional snail’s pace of bureaucracy and the unjustified decisions government agencies can impose. Secrecy is infecting every corner of government, leaving the public out in the cold to participate in and understand the agreement, bills, laws, rules and regulations – not to mention the unspoken barriers to access thrown up to citizens and the media by lawmakers and agency officials alike.

Crisis management reared its ugly head again earlier this last week when the bills written in the dark by Mr. Dayton and the GOP and presented to the full House and Senate under cover of speed and secrecy were barely seen even by those whose job it is to vote on these matters, let alone analyze them for their effect on constituents. Why the rush? Of course, 22,000 state employees, not to mention constituents were clamoring for a restart of state government.

CommonCause/Minnesota worked to ensure at least a 72-hour deliberation and study period for the bills submitted and passed without a moment’s discussion or a single amendment allowed during the Special Session Gov. Dayton called. Of course, the three-day period was rejected on the grounds that – Naomi, are you listening? – it would prolong the already protracted state government shutdown. Crisis decision-making at its finest. Skip the details. Pass the bills, open the doors and get those workers back on the job. What more could they have done? Plenty.

Two DFL legislators – Rep. Mindy Greiling and Sen. John Marty – have introduced bills that would require open processes in all legislative work, but primarily all budget negotiations between and among legislative leaders and even between those leaders and the governor.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with open government advocates (are there any real secrecy defenders out there?) and examine the trend toward increasing secrecy in all aspects of public governance and media coverages.

REP. MINDY GREILING – DFL Lead, House Education Finance Committee

MIKE DEAN – President, CommonCause/Minnesota

RICH NEUMEISTER – longtime public interest citizen lobbyist and award-winning open government activist and blogger

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First Person Radio July 6: SHIRLEY K. SNEVE: Native Media Storyteller - AUDIO HERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock and Andy Driscoll of First Person Radio talk with Shirley K. Sneve, Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications, whose mission is to share Native stories with the world through support of the creation, promotion, and distribution of Native public media. Shirley moved to Nebraska from Amherst, MA, where she was director of Arts Extension Service, a national arts service organization, based at the University of Massachusetts, from 2001-2004. A member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Sicangu Lakota) in South Dakota, Shirley was a founder of Northern Plains Tribal Arts Juried Show and Market, the Oyate Trail cultural tourism byway, and the Alliance of Tribal Tourism Advocates.

TruthToTell, July 25: BUDGET SECRECY:Opening Windows on Government - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 07/25/2011

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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GUESTS:

REP. MINDY GREILING – DFL Lead, House Education Finance Committee

MIKE DEAN – President, CommonCause/Minnesota

RICH NEUMEISTER – longtime public interest citizen lobbyist and award-winning open government activist and blogger

It’s was an episode to do Naomi Klein proud. The author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism should have been taking notes for her third revision of that seminal book on crisis management and the use of chaos to push through unConstitutional policy and legislation based on fear-mongering and tight deadlines.

President Obama and Speaker John Boehner – essentially leaving the Senate, let alone the public – out of the loop – continue to meet behind closed doors. Then, there’s the US Senate Gang of Six – more secret meetings with direct fiscal effects on American and Minnesota lives – with no input from us.

Such was the case with the newly “negotiated” deal struck between Governor Mark Dayton and the GOP legislative majority leadership last weekend – deals and dynamics that all took place behind closed doors – inside the “cone of silence” – ostensibly to allow greater candor between the parties.

Think about this. Why is candor reserved for hidden talks and not for public consumption as our tax dollars are made to work against the general well-being, not to mention the vast majorities of Minnesotans willing to pay a bit more toward a balanced budget without saddling our kids with future debt and slicing and dicing the all-important  state programs and services that actually help us all?

Worse, the Capitol itself was locked down to citizens and visitors. And just as disturbing was the absence of citizens and visitors knocking on those doors to get a look at the resulting process and package.

Secrecy is a public leprosy eroding public confidence in government more deeply than even the normal frustrations we feel with the occasional snail’s pace of bureaucracy and the unjustified decisions government agencies can impose. Secrecy is infecting every corner of government, leaving the public out in the cold to participate in and understand the agreement, bills, laws, rules and regulations – not to mention the unspoken barriers to access thrown up to citizens and the media by lawmakers and agency officials alike.

Crisis management reared its ugly head again earlier this last week when the bills written in the dark by Mr. Dayton and the GOP and presented to the full House and Senate under cover of speed and secrecy were barely seen even by those whose job it is to vote on these matters, let alone analyze them for their effect on constituents. Why the rush? Of course, 22,000 state employees, not to mention constituents were clamoring for a restart of state government.

CommonCause/Minnesota worked to ensure at least a 72-hour deliberation and study period for the bills submitted and passed without a moment’s discussion or a single amendment allowed during the Special Session Gov. Dayton called. Of course, the three-day period was rejected on the grounds that – Naomi, are you listening? – it would prolong the already protracted state government shutdown. Crisis decision-making at its finest. Skip the details. Pass the bills, open the doors and get those workers back on the job. What more could they have done? Plenty.

Two DFL legislators – Rep. Mindy Greiling and Sen. John Marty – have introduced bills that would require open processes in all legislative work, but primarily all budget negotiations between and among legislative leaders and even between those leaders and the governor.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with open government advocates (are there any real secrecy defenders out there?) and examine the trend toward increasing secrecy in all aspects of public governance and media coverages.


55:27 minutes (50.77 MB)