Ojibwe

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TruthToTell, Wednesday, AUG 14−7PM: LIVE from WHITE EARTH: Constitutional Milestone Debate - Who Will Be Enrolled? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming at KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Wed, 08/14/2013

TruthToTell: Community Connections to Broadcast LIVE Forum on proposed new White Earth Constitution – Weds, Aug 14th on KFAI FM 90.3 and 106.7 and KFAI.org - AND Niijii Radio/KKWE, White Earth - FM 89.9 and http://niijiiradio.com/.

Erma Vizenor- White Earth Tribal Chair

Gerald Vizenor – Author/Poet, Wordsmith of the Constitution

Michael Dahl - Opposition Leader – Community Liaison for the White Earth Land Recovery Project and Niijii Radio

Sharon Enjady - Opposition Leader

Terry Janis- Attorney, Bush-funded facilitator of the Constitutional referendum

Community Partners include the White Earth BandNiijii RadioHonor the Earth andShooting Star Casino. ALL area residents are welcome to attend and join the conversation.

The show will air live at 7:00PM KFAI (FM 90.3/106.7/streamed at KFAI.org) in the Twin Cities and KKWE/Niijii Radio, White Earth. 

Additional distribution will come on TruthToTell’s regular air slot at 9:00 AM Labor Day Monday on KFAI, and on television at 8:00 PM August 19 on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16. We will supply audio and video programs to all stations and channels wishing to air them.

TruthToTell, Monday, June 24-9AM: ENCORE: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS V: Deeper Issues of Sulfide Mining;

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, June 24, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

 

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

TruthToTell and CivicMedia/Minnesota traveled to the University of Minnesota at Duluth (UMD) to air/televise the 5th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums the night of June 12 in the auditorium of the Labovitz School of Business & Economics (LSBE) –this one on the impacts of copper/nickel mining enterprises on Northeastern Minnesota lives and natural resources just as a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed PolyMet sulfide mine will be released prior permitting by the MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Army Corps of Engineers.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, brought Community Connections to affected residents of neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the state’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated with Minnesota’s many Indian tribes over the ability to manage the resources of those lands for the benefit of all residents. At risk may well be the planet's entire supply of true wild rice–manoomin–as a sacred crop of Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Natives.

Community Partners signing on to help CMM and TTT produce this televised conversation among panelists and constituents immediately impacted if these new mines are permitted were the Master of Advocacy & Political Leadership (MAPL)Program at UMD; KUMD RadioWaterLegacyFriends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; and Friends of the Cloquet Valley State Forest with cooperation of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and some labor unions serving the area.  

 GUESTS:

Nancy Schuldt, Water Resource Policy Director for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Paula Maccabee, Policy Director for WaterLegacy


 

 

 Aaron Klemz, Policy and Communications Director for the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

 Tamara Jones, President of the Carlton County Central Labor Body and a Union Rep for the United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1189

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, June 17, 2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It could be rationally believed that, with the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) (read Obamacare)**, single-payeradvocates would pull in their horns on the strength of the coming 2014 implementation of that law that would seem to cover everyone (universal coverage) at some reasonable cost – see Health Insurance Exchanges –MNsure in Minnesota.

To that notion, Health Care for All-Minnesota (in league with Physicians for a National Health Plan Minnesota – PNHP) replies, “The federal reforms are a positive step that will provide coverage to many of the uninsured, but they do little to control the costs for those who already have insurance, and the skyrocketing cost of health care must be addressed. By delivering health care in an efficient, common sense manner, the MHP will make health care affordable to all.

MHP is the Minnesota Health Plan – an alternative to the ACA’s Health Insurance Exchanges and MNsure – is proposed as a system to cover everyone, leaving out no one and doing it all for less money, according to these proponents.

A few months ago, TTT’s Community Connections series brought you a one-hour special broadcast live from the Wilder Foundation and featured advocates and arguments in favor of Minnesota’s legislation to create its own version of a federally mandated health insurance exchange – an option for states to establish (some have, some refuse to, meaning the feds will step in and run one) a system allowing those without employer-supplied insurance or medical assistance to purchase some sort of plan. PNHP appeared in support of that plan, but stressed that the real answer for universal coverage at a minimal or no cost to patients while lowering the “skyrocketing” costs of healthcare, period.

And, so the push by supporters of single-payer – a system of mandated coverage paid for by your tax dollars with services provided by the same private providers (clinics and hospitals and professionals) now providing your care – maintain their belief and their campaign – and we’ll ask why all this is necessary under the circumstances.

And we’ll hear cuttings of a powerful one-man play – “Mercy Killers” – live from our studios with that show’s writer and performer, Michael Milligan, here to perform his entire play at HCA-MN and PNHP-MN’s Annual Summer Celebration, this year from the stage of Chanhassen Dinner Theatre this coming Thursday, June 20th. (A few seats are left for only the performance at this writing, so check here for ticket availability.)

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI bring you a discussion with the proponents of single-payer and an introduction to “Mercy Killers”.

** The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed by Congress and signed into law by the President in March 2010. On June 28, 2012, the Supreme Court rendered a final decision to uphold the health care law.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR JOHN MARTY (DFL-66) – Member, Health, Human Services and HousingCommittee (Also: Chair, Environment and Energy Committee).

 

ERIN ANDERSON – Executive Director, Health Care for All-Minnesota

 

 

 


MICHAEL MILLIGAN – Creator, Performer, “Mercy Killers.


AND YOU!! CALL US at 612-341-0980 or post a comment at TruthToTell's Facebook Page

 

 

TruthToTell, June 24: ENCORE: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS V: Deeper Issues of Sulfide Mining – Audio and Video BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 06/24/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell and CivicMedia/Minnesota traveled to the University of Minnesota at Duluth (UMD) to air/televise the 5th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums the night of June 12 in the auditorium of the Labovitz School of Business & Economics (LSBE) –this one on the impacts of copper/nickel mining enterprises on Northeastern Minnesota lives and natural resources just as a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed PolyMet sulfide mine will be released prior permitting by the MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Army Corps of Engineers.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, brought Community Connections to affected residents of neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the state’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated with Minnesota’s many Indian tribes over the ability to manage the resources of those lands for the benefit of all residents. At risk may well be the planet's entire supply of true wild rice–manoomin–as a sacred crop of Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Natives.

Community Partners signing on to help CMM and TTT produce this televised conversation among panelists and constituents immediately impacted if these new mines are permitted were the Master of Advocacy & Political Leadership (MAPL)Program at UMD; KUMD RadioWaterLegacyFriends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; and Friends of the Cloquet Valley State Forest with cooperation of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and some labor unions serving the area.  

 GUESTS:

Nancy Schuldt, Water Resource Policy Director for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Paula Maccabee, Policy Director for WaterLegacy


 

 

 Aaron Klemz, Policy and Communications Director for the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

 Tamara Jones, President of the Carlton County Central Labor Body and a Union Rep for the United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1189

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

DATE CORRECT: TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming @KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Mon, 03/25/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate – AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/14/2011

Robert Desjarlait is Ojibwe-Anishinabe from Red Lake, Minnesota. He is a co-founder of Protect Our Manoomin – a Minnesota Anishinaabe grassroots organization that informs and educates on mining and its effects on manoomin. DesJarlait is involved as a facilitator for White Bison Wellbriety groups in the Twin Cities. He is a journalist and has written for The Circle Newspaper. He is also a member of the University of Minnesota Council of Elders.

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll get an update on the wild rice and other highly sensitive environmental issues threatening the survival of wild rice in the Upper Midwest ricing areas in Minnesota. Wild Rice - Mahnoomin - is one of the sacred foods of the Anishinabe. It has been harvested by environmentally protected processes for centuries by the Dakota and Anishinabe peoples.


50:59 minutes (46.69 MB)

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate - KFAI FM90.3/106.7/Streamed @KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 12: INSIDE KFAI: Become an Insider, Too - LISTEN BELOW and WATCH

First Person Radio, Weds, Sept 14: ROBERT DESJARLAIT: Ojibwe Artist-Manoomin Advocate - KFAI FM90.3/106.7/Streamed @KFAI.org

Robert Desjarlait is Ojibwe-Anishinabe from Red Lake, Minnesota. He is a co-founder of Protect Our Manoomin – a Minnesota Anishinaabe grassroots organization that informs and educates on mining and its effects on manoomin. DesJarlait is involved as a facilitator for White Bison Wellbriety groups in the Twin Cities. He is a journalist and has written for The Circle Newspaper. He is also a member of the University of Minnesota Council of Elders.

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll get an update on the wild rice and other highly sensitive environmental issues threatening the survival of wild rice in the Upper Midwest ricing areas in Minnesota. Wild Rice - Mahnoomin - is one of the sacred foods of the Anishinabe. It has been harvested by environmentally protected processes for centuries by the Dakota and Anishinabe peoples.

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TruthToTell, Sept 12: INSIDE KFAI: Become an Insider, Too - LISTEN HERE and/or WATCH HERE

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE to CivicMedia HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Most of you who see our announcements and hear our shows may not really know what KFAI is about deep down – at least not all of it. As a community-based station – YOUR station, to be sure – we’re made up of about five staff and a few hundred volunteers – including all of us programmers and producers, etc. None of us are paid.

We’re your basic nonprofit – and we survive and thrive on contributions from people and foundations, etc., but, like all nonprofits, we have a governing board and a mess of important committees who all toil in the background to keep us a viable operating radio station as well as a solvent nonprofit.

This week, we bring you inside KFAI and give you a chance to hear about us and ask questions of a few of the key people who help make KFAI tick, usually well out of the limelight, but willing to devote time and energy – and money, of course – to keep us going.

What you may not know is that you, too, could be a part of this crew and we’ll let our board and committee activists talk about what’s really needed around here and the opportunities you have to help us out.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL chats with four of our most active members, including our board’s chair – and we encourage you to get active with KFAI (and CivicMedia).

GUESTS:

JOEL ZIMMERMAN – Chair, KFAI, Fresh Air, Inc. Board of Directors/Executive Committee

ZUHUR AHMED – Board Member and Host of KFAI’s Somali Voices

TED SINGER – Chair, Governance Committee, KFAI Board and longtime KFAI Volunteer

JOHN SLADE – KFAI Board Second Vice President/Executive Committee, Nominations Committee, and Co-Convener, KFAI’s Strategic Planning Committee

First Person Radio:Nov 10: ANTON TREUER: Ojibwe Language Teacher and Advocate-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 11/10/2010

Dr. Anton Treuer (pronounced troy-er) is Professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University. He has a B.A. from Princeton University, M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He is Editor of the Oshkaabewis (pronounced o-shkaah-bay-wis) Native Journal, the only academic journal of the Ojibwe language. His published books include Ojibwe in Minnesota (2010), The Assassination of Hole in the Day (2010), Awesiinyensag: Dibaajimowinan Ji-gikinoo’amaageng (2010), Living Our Language: Ojibwe Tales & Oral Histories (2001), Aaniin Ekidong: Ojibwe Vocabulary Project (2009), and Omaa Akiing (2002). Dr. Treuer has sat on many organizational boards, ranging from the White Earth Land Recovery Project to MeritCare Health System.

Dr. Treuer has received prestigious awards and fellowships from the American Philosophical Society, National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Minnesota Historical Society, the Minnesota Humanities Commission, the Experienced Faculty Development Program, the Institute for the Study of World Politics, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Grotto Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Bush Foundation, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.


53:48 minutes (24.63 MB)