Peace

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Building Peace in Syria From the Ground Up: A Conversation with Mel Duncan, Co-Founder of the Nonviolent Peaceforce

On-air date: 
Mon, 02/23/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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When is the last time you heard President Obama, or any other national leader for that matter, proposing a major escalation in support for non-violent, community-centered approaches to conflict resolution?  Seems idealistic right? The only response to the violence in Syria—and other global “hotspots” is more violence.  Bring in the drones!

Mel Duncan, co-founder of the Nonviolent Peaceforce (NVPF), begs to differ. He joins TruthtoTell host Tom O’Connell for a conversation about lessons learned from 12 years of civilian peace-making in the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and South Sudan and how NVPF is teaming up with local leaders in Syria to create dialogue and conflict prevention across political and sectarian divides.  

Monday, Dec 23- Peace on Earth: A holiday conversation on peacemaking

In this holiday season, TruthtoTell pauses to reflect on the annual promise of peace on earth and good will to all.  Universal peace may seem an unattainable goal, at least in the short term, but that doesn’t stop peace makers (and war resisters) from working creatively to bring peace with justice to our neighborhoods and the world. 

Tune in this Monday as TTT hosts Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell talk with four Twin Cities’ peace makers about their work, the lessons they are learning, and what gives them hope. 

 

 

 

On-air guests:

Tim Wallis- Phd in peace studies, has worked on peacemaking all over the world, former Director, Nonviolent Peaceforce, currently working on The Futility of Force affirming diplomacy, mutual trust, and belief in common humanity.

Melvin Giles- Twin Cities Peacemaker, member of the Minnesota Alliance of Peacemakers.

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer- Associate Professor of Justice and Peace Studies at the University of St. Thomas, Founder, Minnesota Arms Spending Alternatives Project (MNASAP),  Author, Authentic Hope: It’s the End of the World as we know it, but soft landings are possible.

Lucia Wilkes-Smith - Long-time participant and former staff, Women Against Military Madness (WAMM).  Currently working with WAMM’s Middle East and Ground All Drones Committee, actively working to inform the public about the illegal SodaStream operation in the West Bank. 

TruthToTell - Monday, Dec 23: Peace on Earth: A holiday conversation on peacemaking around the world

On-air date: 
Mon, 12/23/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

In this holiday season, TruthtoTell pauses to reflect on the annual promise of peace on earth and good will to all.  Universal peace may seem an unattainable goal, at least in the short term, but that doesn’t stop peace makers (and war resisters) from working creatively to bring peace with justice to our neighborhoods and the world. 

Tune in this Monday as TTT hosts Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell talk with four Twin Cities’ peace makers about their work, the lessons they are learning, and what gives them hope. 

On-air guests:

Tim Wallis- Phd in peace studies, has worked on peacemaking all over the world, former Director, Nonviolent Peaceforce, currently working on The Futility of Force affirming diplomacy, mutual trust, and belief in common humanity.

Melvin Giles- Twin Cities Peacemaker, member of the Minnesota Alliance of Peacemakers.

 

 

 

 

Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer- Associate Professor of Justice and Peace Studies at the University of St. Thomas, Founder, Minnesota Arms Spending Alternatives Project (MNASAP),  Author, Authentic Hope: It’s the End of the World as we know it, but soft landings are possible.

Lucia Wilkes-Smith - Long-time participant and former staff, Women Against Military Madness (WAMM).  Currently working with WAMM’s Middle East and Ground All Drones Committee, actively working to inform the public about the illegal SodaStream operation in the West Bank. 

CORRECTION: TruthToTell Monday, APRIL 2-9AM: DICK BANCROFT: Native Protest Photographer - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

WELCOME To WEEK TWO  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. We're almost halfway to our goal halfway trhough our Membership period. CALL in and Pledge your support: 612-375-9030!

Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030! 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 He’s an unlikely radical. But his country’s hypocrisy, its lies about war and its clandestine destabilizing of democratically elected governments while propping up despots in others, when the conduct became as transparent as it did, drove Dick Bancroft round the bend back in the 1960s…and he’s seen no end of it in South America, in the Middle East, in Asia, Africa. This, after an affluent childhood in “old” St. Paul and an “iffy” education at the city’s primary private school – St. Paul Academy where his dyslexia contributed to less than stellar scholastics.

 Bancroft has never wanted for the resources to support his family, but the resources that turn most affluent Americans into Republicans (he voted for Eisenhower in 1952) couldn’t prevent his radicalization after witnessing racism and exploitation in both his own and other countries. Where a few economic interests have enslaved the indigenous peoples of others, aided and abetted by the political class of the United States, controlled and manipulated by the economic aristocracy, Bancroft’s gift of chronicling and recording on film the history and historiography of the exploited classes everywhere put Bancroft front and center of international intrigue and domestic rebellion by our country’s own Natives – including the founding and fostering of the American Indian Movement (AIM).

 

 

 

 

 

Stokely Carmichael, William Kunstler, Dennis Banks

Thus did Dick Bancroft and his wife, Debbie dedicate these last 50 years to fighting the barbarism and subversion of justice here and abroad through his camera lens and financial resources, hoping to expose the lies perpetrated by our governments in pursuit of profits and power across the prairie and around the globe.

Dick Bancroft continues our look into the history and work of protest and dissent in Minnesota and its export elsewhere to expose the violence and hypocrisy of a country whose founding documents say one thing about liberty, justice, peace and equality while its history and official decisions contradict all of them, year after year, decade after decade. (Listen to last week’s conversation with Historian Rhoda Gilman and African-American change agents of the 60s, Rose Mary Freeman Massey and Melvin Giles.)

 

 

 

 

 

Rigoberta Menchú

Bancroft has rubbed shoulders and noses with Nobel laureatesGuatemalan Rigoberta Menchú and Ireland’s Mairead Corrigan Maguire, photographed them and been their friend. He has earned blood-brotherhood with the Ojibwe and Dakota peoples of Minnesota and the Upper Midwest with his work with AIM. And he has created a pictorial history of the joys and tragedies that accompany the lives of native peoples everywhere.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with Dick Bancroft, now nearly 85 years old, and reflect with him about the events that most marked his abandonment of his family’s political underpinnings and racial prejudices to create a world of peace and justice with Debbie and their children, which include polar explorer Anne Bancroft.

Dick will offer signed posters as membership premiums that feature his iconic photo of Rigoberta Menchú – symbol of Guatemala’s indigenous fight for independence and outspoken advocate for justice in the banana fields of her country.

 GUEST:

 RICHARD BANCROFT – Global Photographer; Peace Advocate

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 26, 2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WELCOME To WEEK ONE  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030! 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The history of social activism in Minnesota is as much about protest as it is about advocacy. Social justice and protest are inextricably linked.

When it comes to legal dissent and embracing protest as political expression and free speech, official forces in the US and Minnesota have always resisted. When resistance meets resistance, when power resists those who speak to power, someone usually gets hurt. Such clashes date to the founding of all political entities everywhere – and Minnesota’s own history is rife and rich with the quest for justice, but recently – say, over the past 40-50 years of social and political upheaval – the forces of government have become more virulent, more dangerous in the name of homeland security and the so-called war on terror, than any previous periods, save those between the industrial giants and their exploited labor masses.

With every passing day, it seems, the government, even under Barak Obama, perhaps especially under this President, the Justice Department and local police forces keep stretching what they believe are justified intrusions into our private lives, not to mention our Constitutional right to publicly protest, to dissent from official policies maintaining our involvement in war and nation-building, in protecting despots over the people the rule. Thus do local and federal police forces now have the declared legal wherewithal to use any means necessary to quell such expression.

Those who have spent their lives or part of them standing up to these forces who would trample the rights of the rest of us to demand the elimination of discrimination, of racism, or the inequality of all humanity in every field of human endeavors are often praised in eulogies because they’ve died doing so.

Occasionally, some progress is claimed and rewarded with institutional change or with a cultural shift, slow as they all may be. Those still around to accept the kudos deserve them for their work as well as their survival.

The history of these phenomena is captured in a marvelous little volume by revered Minnesota Historian, Rhoda Gilman, one of the truly articulate chroniclers of Minnesota’s historical realities, including the definitive biography of Minnesota’s first state governor, Henry Sibley. Her latest book, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition, traces our conflicts beginning with the imposition on Minnesota’s Native peoples of the white man’s greed which itself came to a head during the Dakota Uprising 150 years ago this year, and takes us right up through the rise of the political right and the clashes in between.

Among the events demonstrating precisely the importance of protest was the 1969 takeover of the UofM’s Morrill Hall by African-American students. That upheaval led to the creation of the U’s first dedicated department – the African-American Studies Department, now the African-American and African Studies DepartmentMorrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund was established by alumni attending "We Still Have a Charge to Keep" events three years ago, the 40th Anniversary of V-DAY at Morrill Hall.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests how effective such work have been in altering the political and institutional landscape long considered uneven and unfair.

GUESTS:

RHODA GILMAN – Historian, retired from the Minnesota Historical Society; former Green Party candidate for Lieutenant Governor; Author, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition

ROSE MARY FREEMAN MASSEY – Original member and President, 1969 UofM Afro American Action Committee; co-founder with Dr. Horace Huntley of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund; Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College History Department.

 MELVIN GILES – St. Paul Community activist, peace advocate, community gardener; One of the first two recipients of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund.

TruthToTell Monday, March 26-9AM: DICK BANCROFT: Native Protest Photographer - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

WELCOME To WEEK TWO  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. We're almost halfway to our goal halfway trhough our Membership period. CALL in and Pledge your support: 612-375-9030!

Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030! 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 He’s an unlikely radical. But his country’s hypocrisy, its lies about war and its clandestine destabilizing of democratically elected governments while propping up despots in others, when the conduct became as transparent as it did, drove Dick Bancroft round the bend back in the 1960s…and he’s seen no end of it in South America, in the Middle East, in Asia, Africa. This, after an affluent childhood in “old” St. Paul and an “iffy” education at the city’s primary private school – St. Paul Academy where his dyslexia contributed to less than stellar scholastics.

 Bancroft has never wanted for the resources to support his family, but the resources that turn most affluent Americans into Republicans (he voted for Eisenhower in 1952) couldn’t prevent his radicalization after witnessing racism and exploitation in both his own and other countries. Where a few economic interests have enslaved the indigenous peoples of others, aided and abetted by the political class of the United States, controlled and manipulated by the economic aristocracy, Bancroft’s gift of chronicling and recording on film the history and historiography of the exploited classes everywhere put Bancroft front and center of international intrigue and domestic rebellion by our country’s own Natives – including the founding and fostering of the American Indian Movement (AIM).

 

 

 

 

 

Stokely Carmichael, William Kunstler, Dennis Banks

Thus did Dick Bancroft and his wife, Debbie dedicate these last 50 years to fighting the barbarism and subversion of justice here and abroad through his camera lens and financial resources, hoping to expose the lies perpetrated by our governments in pursuit of profits and power across the prairie and around the globe.

Dick Bancroft continues our look into the history and work of protest and dissent in Minnesota and its export elsewhere to expose the violence and hypocrisy of a country whose founding documents say one thing about liberty, justice, peace and equality while its history and official decisions contradict all of them, year after year, decade after decade. (Listen to last week’s conversation with Historian Rhoda Gilman and African-American change agents of the 60s, Rose Mary Freeman Massey and Melvin Giles.)

 

 

 

 

 

Rigoberta Menchú

Bancroft has rubbed shoulders and noses with Nobel laureatesGuatemalan Rigoberta Menchú and Ireland’s Mairead Corrigan Maguire, photographed them and been their friend. He has earned blood-brotherhood with the Ojibwe and Dakota peoples of Minnesota and the Upper Midwest with his work with AIM. And he has created a pictorial history of the joys and tragedies that accompany the lives of native peoples everywhere.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with Dick Bancroft, now nearly 85 years old, and reflect with him about the events that most marked his abandonment of his family’s political underpinnings and racial prejudices to create a world of peace and justice with Debbie and their children, which include polar explorer Anne Bancroft.

Dick will offer signed posters as membership premiums that feature his iconic photo of Rigoberta Menchú – symbol of Guatemala’s indigenous fight for independence and outspoken advocate for justice in the banana fields of her country.

 GUEST:

 RICHARD BANCROFT – Global Photographer; Peace Advocate

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 26, 2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WELCOME To WEEK ONE  of KFAI’s Spring Membership Drive. Please Support TruthToTell and our production Partner, KFAI. Call in your tax-deductible pledge: 612-375-9030! 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The history of social activism in Minnesota is as much about protest as it is about advocacy. Social justice and protest are inextricably linked.

When it comes to legal dissent and embracing protest as political expression and free speech, official forces in the US and Minnesota have always resisted. When resistance meets resistance, when power resists those who speak to power, someone usually gets hurt. Such clashes date to the founding of all political entities everywhere – and Minnesota’s own history is rife and rich with the quest for justice, but recently – say, over the past 40-50 years of social and political upheaval – the forces of government have become more virulent, more dangerous in the name of homeland security and the so-called war on terror, than any previous periods, save those between the industrial giants and their exploited labor masses.

With every passing day, it seems, the government, even under Barak Obama, perhaps especially under this President, the Justice Department and local police forces keep stretching what they believe are justified intrusions into our private lives, not to mention our Constitutional right to publicly protest, to dissent from official policies maintaining our involvement in war and nation-building, in protecting despots over the people the rule. Thus do local and federal police forces now have the declared legal wherewithal to use any means necessary to quell such expression.

Those who have spent their lives or part of them standing up to these forces who would trample the rights of the rest of us to demand the elimination of discrimination, of racism, or the inequality of all humanity in every field of human endeavors are often praised in eulogies because they’ve died doing so.

Occasionally, some progress is claimed and rewarded with institutional change or with a cultural shift, slow as they all may be. Those still around to accept the kudos deserve them for their work as well as their survival.

The history of these phenomena is captured in a marvelous little volume by revered Minnesota Historian, Rhoda Gilman, one of the truly articulate chroniclers of Minnesota’s historical realities, including the definitive biography of Minnesota’s first state governor, Henry Sibley. Her latest book, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition, traces our conflicts beginning with the imposition on Minnesota’s Native peoples of the white man’s greed which itself came to a head during the Dakota Uprising 150 years ago this year, and takes us right up through the rise of the political right and the clashes in between.

Among the events demonstrating precisely the importance of protest was the 1969 takeover of the UofM’s Morrill Hall by African-American students. That upheaval led to the creation of the U’s first dedicated department – the African-American Studies Department, now the African-American and African Studies DepartmentMorrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund was established by alumni attending "We Still Have a Charge to Keep" events three years ago, the 40th Anniversary of V-DAY at Morrill Hall.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests how effective such work have been in altering the political and institutional landscape long considered uneven and unfair.

GUESTS:

RHODA GILMAN – Historian, retired from the Minnesota Historical Society; former Green Party candidate for Lieutenant Governor; Author, Stand UP! The Story of Minnesota’ Protest Tradition

ROSE MARY FREEMAN MASSEY – Original member and President, 1969 UofM Afro American Action Committee; co-founder with Dr. Horace Huntley of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund; Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College History Department.

 MELVIN GILES – St. Paul Community activist, peace advocate, community gardener; One of the first two recipients of the Morrill Hall/Rachel Tilsen Social Justice Fund.

TruthToTell, April 2: DICK BANCROFT: Native Protest Photographer - AUDIO PODCAST BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 04/02/2012

He’s an unlikely radical. But his country’s hypocrisy, its lies about war and its clandestine destabilizing of democratically elected governments while propping up despots in others, when the conduct became as transparent as it did, drove Dick Bancroft round the bend back in the 1960s…and he’s seen no end of it in South America, in the Middle East, in Asia, Africa. This, after an affluent childhood in “old” St. Paul and an “iffy” education at the city’s primary private school – St. Paul Academy where his dyslexia contributed to less than stellar scholastics.

Bancroft has never wanted for the resources to support his family, but the resources that turn most affluent Americans into Republicans (he voted for Eisenhower in 1952) couldn’t prevent his radicalization after witnessing racism and exploitation in both his own and other countries. Where a few economic interests have enslaved the indigenous peoples of others, aided and abetted by the political class of the United States, controlled and manipulated by the economic aristocracy, Bancroft’s gift of chronicling and recording on film the history and historiography of the exploited classes everywhere put Bancroft front and center of international intrigue and domestic rebellion by our country’s own Natives – including the founding and fostering of the American Indian Movement (AIM).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stokely Carmichael, William Kunstler, Dennis Banks

Thus did Dick Bancroft and his wife, Debbie dedicate these last 50 years to fighting the barbarism and subversion of justice here and abroad through his camera lens and financial resources, hoping to expose the lies perpetrated by our governments in pursuit of profits and power across the prairie and around the globe.

 Dick Bancroft continues our look into the history and work of protest and dissent in Minnesota and its export elsewhere to expose the violence and hypocrisy of a country whose founding documents say one thing about liberty, justice, peace and equality while its history and official decisions contradict all of them, year after year, decade after decade. (Listen to last week’s conversation with Historian Rhoda Gilman and African-American change agents of the 60s, Rose Mary Freeman Massey and Melvin Giles.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rigoberta Menchú

Bancroft has rubbed shoulders and noses with Nobel laureatesGuatemalan Rigoberta Menchú and Ireland’s Mairead Corrigan Maguire, photographed them and been their friend. He has earned blood-brotherhood with the Ojibwe and Dakota peoples of Minnesota and the Upper Midwest with his work with AIM. And he has created a pictorial history of the joys and tragedies that accompany the lives of native peoples everywhere.

Here's a new addition: a 1970s photo of Dick Bancroft (with hair still dark) with L-R, Troubadour Larry Long (and still writing and singing), Painter Jan Attridge (another illustrator of nature and Native life in Minnesota and the Dakotas and still painting) and The Circle Native newspaper contributor, Mordecai Specktor (also Editor of the American Jewish World):

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with Dick Bancroft, now nearly 85 years old, and reflect with him about the events that most marked his abandonment of his family’s political underpinnings and racial prejudices to create a world of peace and justice with Debbie and their children, which include polar explorer Anne Bancroft.

Dick will offer signed posters as membership premiums that feature his iconic photo of Rigoberta Menchú – symbol of Guatemala’s indigenous fight for independence and outspoken advocate for justice in the banana fields of her country.

 

 GUEST:

  RICHARD BANCROFT – Global Photographer; Peace Advocate


44:08 minutes (40.41 MB)