phyllis kahn

warning: Parameter 2 to onepixelout_swftools_flashvars() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/langmul/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 476.

A Local Race With Historic Implications: Who Will Represent Residents of House District 60B

On-air date: 
Mon, 01/11/2016
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

In 1972, Phyllis Kahn made history when she was elected state representative as part of a feminist wave that put an end to what had been a male monopoly in the Minnesota Legislature. Four decades later, two challengers are seeking to make some history of their own. Community leaders Mohamud Noor and Ilhan Omar, both DFLers, are also running for the 60B seat. If elected, one of them would become Minnesota’s first Somali legislator. 

 A conversation with Representative Phyllis Kahn and challengers Ilhan Omar and Mohamud Noor (invited) on TruthtoTell, Monday morning, January 11, 9-10, KFAI Radio, 90.3 Minneapolis or 106.7 St. Paul.  You can live stream at www.kfai.org or catch it later on the KFAI archive.  Click ON DEMAND and search for TruthtoTell.   

TruthToTell Monday, March 19-9AM: FLOODING THE BALLOT: Legislating by Constitutional Amendment - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Photo by Shekleton (Shekshots)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell Monday, March 19-9AM: FLOODING THE BALLOT: Legislating by Constitutional Amendment - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Are we becoming California by a back door? California law is peppered with voter-passed initiatives and referenda. Is this true democracy? Or a denigration of representative government?

The Minnesota Constitution does not allow what California’s does: passing and repealing state statutes by IR&R – Initiative, Referendum and Recall. Not that Republicans haven’t tried to install that device in the Constitution (current House File 2562King Banaian [R-St. Cloud] would do just that), claiming that true democracy is when citizens vote directly for state laws, bypassing the Legislature. This would be 7th amendment offered up this year.

But to pass laws by popular vote right now, legislators can place them on the ballot only in the form of Constitutional amendments. (Referenda, or the repeal of existing state law, is not currently allowed at all. Recall of state office holders is allowed by a convoluted process involving the courts.)

So – this year and last – new but frustrated Republican majorities in both houses have found their rightwing agenda neutralized by the veto pen of DFL Governor Mark Dayton. In response they’re attempting to send their entire agenda to the ballot box – some bills already having been vetoed, others not. The issues already heading for the voters or possibly on the ballot thus far:

  1. The Marriage Amendment – defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Placed on this year’s November ballot last session. (Vice Pres. Walter Mondale and fmr Chief Justice Kathleen Blatz just announced their opposition to this.)
  2. Shoot First – Vetoed this session. So-called castle doctrine principle expanded to allow gun owners to shoot first much sooner – and ask questions later.
  3. Voter ID – Vetoed last session, now on the docket for passage to the November ballot. Requires a photo ID before voting – never mind the millions with no access to such identification.
  4. “Right-to-Work” – This may be floundering – but it would remove the requirement that a worker sign on to union membership in a union shop.
  5. Tax Bill Supermajorities – This may be on the back burner as well. Would require a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to vote in the affirmative for any tax bill to pass.

DFL Rep. Phyllis Kahn (Mpls) has answered with little-discussed bill of her own (HF2175 – companion S.F. No. 2017 [Pappas, et al]) to place on the ballot a question requiring a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to place any Constitutional amendment on the ballot. The theory, perhaps, being that, if the Constitutional amending process placing questions before the electorate continues to bypass any role for the Governor, then it should only be done so by a supermajority of its own. Looks like thus far Kahn’s bill may have languished, like Banaian’s, in the Government Operations and Elections Committee. No action is likely on those two with committee deadlines passing.

Just Friday, MPR's Tim Pugmire reported this on the question of this all perhaps backfiring: "....But Gov. Mark Dayton and other Democrats argue that many of those same voters are offended by the idea of lawmakers governing through the constitution. Dayton said the process not only bypasses him, but bypasses the intent of the state's founders who wanted the executive branch and legislative branch to work together.

DFL legislators insist that when they controlled the House and Senate they held back on using constitutional amendments to get around then-Gov. Tim Pawlenty, a Republican. They claim GOP leaders are now playing with fire. House Minority Leader Paul Thissen, DFL-Minneapolis, said the stage is now set for even more amendments down the road.

'If we start going down this path, it creates a very dangerous precedent," Thissen said. "At the end of the day, I think the fundamental principle is we've got to keep our constitution as limited and as sacred as possible, and it should be about expanding people's rights and not contracting them.'"

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests about individual and collective issues around the flood of Constitutional amendments this session and last – in search for answers about both the wisdom and strategy of piling amendments on the ballot in such a crucial election as this year’s – what with redistricting forcing legislators and Congressmen and women in new territories and a ballot full of offices from President and US Senate on down through judicial races and – yes, Constitutional amendments and, perhaps, even other local ballot questions.

GUESTS:

SUSIE BROWN – Public Policy DirectorMinnesota Council of Nonprofits

HEATHER MARTENS – President, Protect Minnesota

SHAR KNUTSON – President, MN AFL-CIO

INVITED: State Legislators

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell March 12: ALL ABOUT LOCAL: It Ain’t Just the Warm & Fuzzies-AUDIO Podcast HERE

Painting by Tom Slack "Main Street"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Those of who have lived around or near commercial areas in the core cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis for any length of time have noticed the incursion of chains into many of the spaces once occupied by businesses owned by your neighbor down the street or your fellow church or synagogue or mosque member, or by your brothers and sisters of the local lodges.

These people were like family. They weren’t in the business of faceless merchandising, they were in the business to serve and service their neighboring customers. No more in too many cases. Some of the in-town, neighborhood shopping strips like Hennepin Avenue, or Grand Ave. or Payne Avenue have evolved into a series of suburban mall-like stores with owners somewhere in California or New York and few of those relationships with owners and their pride and their workmanship and their locally based products and service operations have been able to survive under the weight of discounting or affordable merchandise and neighborly service.

Keeping the local tradition alive and expanding it has been the business of the Metropolitan Independent Business Association or MetroIBA – emphasis on “Independent” – for a number of years now, and it, too, has its ups and downs. After all, I know how trying to herd a bunch of entrepreneurs into a single-minded organization can be tough duty. Most couldn’t be bothered because most were trying to survive as the independent types they usually are. But Metro IBA has clearly thrived – under some committed leadership and now, energetic management.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI spend an hour with a few of the always interesting characters that comprise the MetroIBA and the concept of localism.

GUESTS:

MARY HAMEL – Executive Director, MetroIBA

JEFF WARNER – President, Warners’ Stellian Appliance Stores in Minneapolis, St. Paul, MetroIBA President

JOHN HOESCHEN – Owner/Pharmacist, St. Paul Corner Drug, St. Paul

TruthToTell March 19: FLOODING THE BALLOT: Legislating by Constitutional Amendment - Audio Podcast BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 03/19/2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Photo by Shekleton (Shekshots)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Are we becoming California by a back door? California law is peppered with voter-passed initiatives and referenda. Is this true democracy? Or a denigration of representative government?

The Minnesota Constitution does not allow what California’s does: passing and repealing state statutes by IR&R – Initiative, Referendum and Recall. Not that Republicans haven’t tried to install that device in the Constitution (current House File 2562, King Banaian [R-St. Cloud] would do just that), claiming that true democracy is when citizens vote directly for state laws, bypassing the Legislature. This would be 7th amendment offered up this year.

But to pass laws by popular vote right now, legislators can place them on the ballot only in the form of Constitutional amendments. (Referenda, or the repeal of existing state law, is not currently allowed at all. Recall of state office holders is allowed by a convoluted process involving the courts.)

So – this year and last – new but frustrated Republican majorities in both houses have found their rightwing agenda neutralized by the veto pen of DFL Governor Mark Dayton. In response they’re attempting to send their entire agenda to the ballot box – some bills already having been vetoed, others not. The issues already heading for the voters or possibly on the ballot thus far:

  1. The Marriage Amendment – defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Placed on this year’s November ballot last session. (Vice Pres. Walter Mondale and fmr Chief Justice Kathleen Blatz just announced their opposition to this.)
  2. Shoot First – Vetoed this session. So-called castle doctrine principle expanded to allow gun owners to shoot first much sooner – and ask questions later.
  3. Voter ID – Vetoed last session, now on the docket for passage to the November ballot. Requires a photo ID before voting – never mind the millions with no access to such identification.
  4. “Right-to-Work” – This may be floundering – but it would remove the requirement that a worker sign on to union membership in a union shop.
  5. Tax Bill Supermajorities – This may be on the back burner as well. Would require a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to vote in the affirmative for any tax bill to pass.

DFL Rep. Phyllis Kahn (Mpls) has answered with little-discussed bill of her own (HF2175 – companion S.F. No. 2017 [Pappas, et al]) to place on the ballot a question requiring a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to place any Constitutional amendment on the ballot. The theory, perhaps, being that, if the Constitutional amending process placing questions before the electorate continues to bypass any role for the Governor, then it should only be done so by a supermajority of its own. Looks like thus far Kahn’s bill may have languished, like Banaian’s, in the Government Operations and Elections Committee. No action is likely on those two with committee deadlines passing.

Just Friday, MPR's Tim Pugmire reported this on the question of this all perhaps backfiring: "....But Gov. Mark Dayton and other Democrats argue that many of those same voters are offended by the idea of lawmakers governing through the constitution. Dayton said the process not only bypasses him, but bypasses the intent of the state's founders who wanted the executive branch and legislative branch to work together.

DFL legislators insist that when they controlled the House and Senate they held back on using constitutional amendments to get around then-Gov. Tim Pawlenty, a Republican. They claim GOP leaders are now playing with fire. House Minority Leader Paul Thissen, DFL-Minneapolis, said the stage is now set for even more amendments down the road.

'If we start going down this path, it creates a very dangerous precedent," Thissen said. "At the end of the day, I think the fundamental principle is we've got to keep our constitution as limited and as sacred as possible, and it should be about expanding people's rights and not contracting them.'"

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI put it to our guests about individual and collective issues around the flood of Constitutional amendments this session and last – in search for answers about both the wisdom and strategy of piling amendments on the ballot in such a crucial election as this year’s – what with redistricting forcing legislators and Congressmen and women in new territories and a ballot full of offices from President and US Senate on down through judicial races and – yes, Constitutional amendments and, perhaps, even other local ballot questions.

GUESTS:

SUSIE BROWN – Public Policy DirectorMinnesota Council of Nonprofits

HEATHER MARTENS – President, Protect Minnesota

SHAR KNUTSON – President, MN AFL-CIO


59:51 minutes (54.79 MB)