Richard LaFortune

TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.orgFirst Person Radio Weds July 13 @9AM: DR. CHRIS MATO NUNPA: Author and Dakota Treaty Expert;

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell, Mon., July 18@9AM: THE COMMON GOOD v. INDIVIDUALISM: Founding Falters - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

We’re living through an era where the notion of the common good has been overwhelmed by the idea of individualism; me and mine. This is manifested on many fronts. One of the most dramatic is this worship of the Constitution as a charter of limited government. We’re also witnessing the denigration of the public sphere and the selling of privatization as the remedy.

John Ritter

Dane Smith’s recent op-ed argues that the Federalists argued for ratification of the constitution because they believed that a strong national government was necessary to promote the common welfare. His work with Growth&Justice is predicated on the idea and the historic reality that government can and must play a strong role in achieving the public good.

Doug Rossinow will provide an historical perspective on this fundamental debate in America on contrasting ideas about the meaning of freedom. He teaches courses on the New Deal, Civil Rights and Reagan eras (among other things) — eras where these contrasting ideas (and practices) were in sharp conflict. His most recent book is Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

How can people be lured out of their self-imposed isolation – either technological or ideological – and see the value of working together toward the common good? How do you engage people, spurring both action on specific issues and reflection on the underlying values those actions represent? ISAIAH’s Doran Schrantz  will help answer those questions.

Guest Host PROFESSOR TOM O'CONNELL of Metropolitan State University and Board Chair of CivicMedia/Minnesota will ask these questions of his guests:

DANE SMITH – Veteran journalist and Executive Director of Growth & Justice, a progressive think tank dedicated to making Minnesota more prosperous and fair.

DOUG ROSSINOW – Professor of History at Metropolitan State University and author of Vision of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

DORAN SCHRANTZ – Executive Director of ISAIAH, a congregation-based organization that engages Minnesotans of faith on issues of economic and racial justice.

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First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO HERE

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

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Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.

First Person Radio, July 13: CHRIS MATO NUNPA/JIM ANDERSON: Dakota Treaty Experts-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/13/2011

They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one - They promised to take our land...and they took it. -- Chief Red Cloud

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll tomorrow on First Person Radio as we talk with Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa on Dakota treaty issues and the stipulations of the Treaty of 1805 which confirms the "Sioux Nation" rights to hunt and fish in what is now Minneapolis and other parts covered by the treaty language. Dr. Mato Nunpa is an expert on the treaty and he was recently stopped from fishing at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. The treaty says in part:

ARTICLE 3. The United States promise on their part to permit the Sioux to pass, repass, hunt or make other uses of the said districts, as they have formerly done, without any other exception, but those specified in article first. (note: which was the creation of Ft. Snelling by Zebulon Pike, the white/US Treaty signatory).

Dr. Chris Mato Nunpa is a Wahpetunwan (“Dwellers In The Leaves,” or Wahpeton) Dakota from the Pezihuta Zizi Otunwe, “Yellow Medicine Community” (BIA name, Upper Sioux Community), in southwestern Minnesota. Dr. Mato Nunpa is now retired, having served as an Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations & Dakota Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota, for his last sixteen (16) years of his professional career, from August 1992 through May 2008. Dr. Mato Nunpa’s special research interest is Genocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S. in general, and Genocide of the Dakota People of Minnesota, specifically. Dr. Mato Nunpa is currently working on a book titled A Sweet-Smelling Savour: Genocide, the Bible, and the Indigenous Peoples of the U.S.

Jim Anderson is the recently elected Chairman of Minnesota’s Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota CommunityAnderson is a longtime Dakota activist, fluid in his storytelling and challenging to those who would flout the treaties he insists protect Indian rights to land uses others would deny his people. Back in February, Anderson and his family, usurped for a home a Mendota building that had served as a community center until the land’s owners – the owners of Axel’s Bonfire restaurants – decided to tear the building down for parking. Anderson was protesting the US government’s failure to recognize his tribe. His other protests have included re-asserting Indian rights to the sacred Coldwater site further north off Highway 55.

Together, Anderson and Mato Nunpa are taking their message of Dakota genocide and treaty violations to audiences and readers across the US.


56:38 minutes (51.85 MB)

First Person Radio:Weds, July 6 @9:00AM: JAMES ROCK/JOEL HALVORSON: Astronomers to Natives; TruthToTell, Mon., July 4 @ 9AM: POLICE OVERREACHING-AND COVERING UP: Dangerous Liaisons-AUDIO BELOW

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with Jim Rock and Joel Halvorson about American Indian astronomy. This will be a very special program, not to be missed! The progress being made in recognition of American Indian views in the often reluctant science of astronomy is spectacular and due in no small part to the work of these two professionals: one Dakota and one white, working side by side.

 James Rock (Dakota) Jim has a Masters degree in education and has taught astronomy, chemistry and physics for almost 30 years. He has taught courses in Native Skywatchers Astronomy and American Indian Philosophy at Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Macalester and the University of Minnesota’s Indigenous Summer Science & Math Program called Andogiikendassowin /Wasdodyawacinpi (Seek To Know) in partnership with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Jim also works as an independent consultant and has worked for organizations such as NASA, NOAA, Native Americans in Philanthropy, Minnesota Planetarium Society and Dakota Wicohan.

 Joel Halvorson is a Program Consultant for the Minnesota Planetarium Society (MNPS). His responsibilities involve developing programs like the ExploraDome outreach program for a new state funded Planetarium. This future facility is now in the process of merging with the Bell Museum of Natural History as part of a future on campus facility at the University of Minnesota.

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IT'S TTT's 4TH ANNIVERSARY ON KFAI! LISTEN IN OR WATCH US ONLINE - AND PLEASE DONATE HERE:

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell now live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

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The fallout from RNC 2008 police abuse continues to ripple through the courts and common sense – not to mention fundamental Constitutional underpinnings. No matter what you want to believe about anarchists and purported violence and the like, police and media accounts of the threats posed by anti-war activists have been shown to be little more than exaggeration designed to instill fear first, among delegates to that year’s Republican National Convention delegates, and second, among average Joes and Janes throughout the state.

 Lingering police and FBI paranoia, much of it generated and unleashed by the Patriot Act and, eventually, two administrations’ Justice departments, feeds the use of federal and local law enforcement as powerful resistors to political dissent. Recently, the Obama Justice Department’s FBI has beefed up its domestic spying and organized resistance to anti-public policy protesters, continuing and expanding Bush domestic spying policies and activities. Support for Palestine gets you arrested or a grand jury subpoena in this country. Demonstrating against this President’s war policies can get you arrested and/or a phone tap. Worse, fear-mongering by both the right wing and the government is eroding support for all First Amendment rights to free speech and assembly.

So sure were both the police and the RNC that such lawsuits would probably be filed – and won – they bonded themselves against financial losses to the tune of $10 million. Much of that money has been recently paid out – mostly in settlements, not jury awards. One of those awards have gone to people whose rights were violated during raids. One of those went to St. Paul homeowner Mike Whelan and a trio of vegans who rented his duplex during the RNC. Representing Whelan and several other plaintiffs has been St. Paul Attorney, Ted Dooley.

But this overreaching by law enforcement, the violence too many cops use against average citizens, even in the normal course of duties, like traffic stops – then lying to cover it in reports and protected by other officers under the unwritten Code of Silence, has reached epidemic levels, especially in the Minneapolis Department. This culture has fed on itself and turned otherwise conscientious cops into lying and covering for their brothers and sisters in blue for over a Century. Chronicling this festering sore is retired Minneapolis police sergeant, Mike Quinn, whose book, Walking with the Devil: The Police Code of Silence, is in its second and revised printing.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with Quinn, Dooley and Whelan (sounds like an Irish law firm) about these very serious breaches of Constitutional guarantees and what they represent in the treatment of minorities and political dissenters throughout this area and the United States as a whole.

GUESTS:

MIKE QUINN – Retired Police Officer and Author of Walking with the Devil (Inside the Code of Silence)

TED DOOLEY – Plaintiffs’ Attorney for several RNC Activists

MIKE WHELAN – Civil lawsuit awardee in raid on his St. Paul home by Officers and Deputies  before the RNC

First Person Radio July 6: JAMES ROCK/JOEL HALVORSON: Astronomers to Natives - Audio BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 07/06/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune with Andy Driscoll talk with Jim Rock and Joel Halvorson about American Indian astronomy. This will be a very special program, not to be missed! The progress being made in recognition of American Indian views in the often reluctant science of astronomy is spectacular and due in no small part to the work of these two professionals: one Dakota, one white, working side by side.

 

 James Rock (Dakota) Jim has a Masters degree in education and has taught astronomy, chemistry and physics for almost 30 years. He has taught courses in Native Skywatchers Astronomy and American Indian Philosophy at Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Macalester and the University of Minnesota’s Indigenous Summer Science & Math Program called Andogiikendassowin /Wasdodyawacinpi (Seek To Know) in partnership with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Jim also works as an independent consultant and has worked for organizations such as NASA, NOAA, Native Americans in Philanthropy, Minnesota Planetarium Society and Dakota Wicohan.

 

  Joel Halvorson is a Program Consultant for the Minnesota Planetarium Society (MNPS). His responsibilities involve developing programs like the ExploraDome outreach program for a new state funded Planetarium. This future facility is now in the process of merging with the Bell Museum of Natural History as part of a future on campus facility at the University of Minnesota.

56:41 minutes (51.9 MB)

First Person Radio:Weds, Jun 29 @9:00AM: HULLEAH J. TSINHNAHJINNIE: Artist-Photographer-Memoirist -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie.

Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie began her art education at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. Since 2004, Tsinhnahjinnie has been faculty in the Department of Native American studies at University of California, Davis, where she is an Associate Professor and serves as Director of the C. N. Gorman Museum

Tsinhnahjinnie was born into the Bear and Raccoon Clans of the Seminole and Muscogee Nations and the Tsinajinnie Clan of the Navajo Nation. Her mother was Seminole and Muscogee and her father, Andrew Van Tsinajinnie, was Diné and a painter and muralist who studied at the Studio in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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TruthToTell, Mon., June 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right? - Audio UP HERE

This week, we bring you an excellent talk by former Washington Post correspondent, T.R. Reid, who spoke to a gala gathering of some 250-300 single-payer advocates at Macalester College in mid-June. The event brought together the Minnesota Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP) and the Minnesota Universal Health Care Coalition (MUHCC). Reid spoke about his experiences research and writing his book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, on the differences among health care systems throughout the industrialized world and asking us all why reasonably priced universal health care continues to elude us even as our friends and enemies overseas and next door cover everyone from womb to tomb and still pay less than half that of the US health system.

T.R. Reid is one of those people whose conversational tone makes it seem as though you’re talking over the backyard fence, but whose deep insights brought us a flavor of his overseas assignments, especially Japan, on National Public Radio for many years.

From his website:

T. R. Reid has become one of the nation’s best-known correspondents through his coverage of global affairs for the Washington Post, his books and documentary films, and his light-hearted commentaries on National Public Radio. He majored in Classics at Princeton University, where he has since done some teaching, and served as a naval officer, a teacher, and various other jobs. At the Washington Post, he covered Congress and four presidential campaigns. He was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo and in London. His story revealing the secret engagement of Crown Prince Naruhito is known in Japan as the dai-sukoopu – that is, “the great scoop.”

Reid has written and hosted documentary films for National Geographic TV, for PBS, and for the A&E network. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” He has written six books in English and three in Japanese and has translated one book from the Japanese. His most recent book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, came out in 2009 and became a national best-seller. PBS Frontline produced two documentary films, “A Second Opinion” and “Sick Around the World,” following Reid as he reported that book.

First Person Radio:June 29: HULLEAH J. TSINHNAHJINNIE: Artist-Photographer-Memoirist -AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 06/29/2011

First Person Radio host Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie.

Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie began her art education at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. Since 2004, Tsinhnahjinnie has been faculty in the Department of Native American studies at University of California, Davis, where she is an Associate Professor and serves as Director of the C. N. Gorman Museum

Tsinhnahjinnie was born into the Bear and Raccoon Clans of the Seminole and Muscogee Nations and the Tsinajinnie Clan of the Navajo Nation. Her mother was Seminole and Muscogee and her father, Andrew Van Tsinajinnie, was Diné and a painter and muralist who studied at the Studio in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


56:54 minutes (91.16 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., June 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org; First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist

We’re recorded this week, but check us out next week and call in to talk about Cops and the Code of Silence once again. Also, back next week on Livestream.com/TruthToTellMN .

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell, Mon., June 20-9AM: T.R. REID: Why Can't The US Do Healthcare Right?

This week, we bring you an excellent talk by former Washington Post correspondent, T.R. Reid, who spoke to a gala gathering of some 250-300 single-payer advocates at Macalester College in mid-June. The event brought together the Minnesota Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP) and the Minnesota Universal Health Care Coalition (MUHCC). Reid spoke about his experiences research and writing his book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, on the differences among health care systems throughout the industrialized world and asking us all why reasonably priced universal health care continues to elude us even as our friends and enemies overseas and next door cover everyone from womb to tomb and still pay less than half that of the US health system.

T.R. Reid is one of those people whose conversational tone makes it seem as though you’re talking over the backyard fence, but whose deep insights brought us a flavor of his overseas assignments, especially Japan, on National Public Radio for many years.

From his website:

T. R. Reid has become one of the nation’s best-known correspondents through his coverage of global affairs for the Washington Post, his books and documentary films, and his light-hearted commentaries on National Public Radio. He majored in Classics at Princeton University, where he has since done some teaching, and served as a naval officer, a teacher, and various other jobs. At the Washington Post, he covered Congress and four presidential campaigns. He was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo and in London. His story revealing the secret engagement of Crown Prince Naruhito is known in Japan as the dai-sukoopu – that is, “the great scoop.”

Reid has written and hosted documentary films for National Geographic TV, for PBS, and for the A&E network. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” He has written six books in English and three in Japanese and has translated one book from the Japanese. His most recent book, The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care, came out in 2009 and became a national best-seller. PBS Frontline produced two documentary films, “A Second Opinion” and “Sick Around the World,” following Reid as he reported that book.

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First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist -AUDIO HERE

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE: 

Listen to last week's program with L. Frank Manriquez HERE.

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First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune talk with Sarah James, a native Gwich'in from Arctic Village, Alaska, USA, and a board member of the International Indian Treaty Council. She was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2002, together with Jonathon Solomon and Norma Kassi. They received the prize for their struggles for protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) from plans of oil exploration and drilling. Oil and gas exploration would disturb the life cycle of the Porcupine caribou, a foundation of the Gwich'in culture for 20,000 years.

Sarah is the board chair and a spokesperson for the Gwich’in Steering Committee, and has educated people around the world about the porcupine-caribou herd and the importance of protecting “the Sacred Place where Life Begins” (the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) from oil exploration and drilling. She has received many awards, including the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, the National Conservation Land Trust Award and the Ecotrust Award for Indigenous Leadership

First Person Radio-Jun 22: SARAH JAMES: Arctic Village Activist -AUDIO UP BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 06/22/2011

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE: 

Listen to last week's program with L. Frank Manriquez HERE.

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First Person Radio hosts Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune talk with Sarah James, a native Gwich'in from Arctic Village, Alaska, USA, and a board member of the International Indian Treaty Council. She was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2002, together with Jonathon Solomon and Norma Kassi. They received the prize for their struggles for protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) from plans of oil exploration and drilling. Oil and gas exploration would disturb the life cycle of the Porcupine caribou, a foundation of the Gwich'in culture for 20,000 years.

Sarah is the board chair and a spokesperson for the Gwich’in Steering Committee, and has educated people around the world about the porcupine-caribou herd and the importance of protecting “the Sacred Place where Life Begins” (the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) from oil exploration and drilling. She has received many awards, including the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, the National Conservation Land Trust Award and the Ecotrust Award for Indigenous Leadership


55:38 minutes (50.93 MB)

First Person Radio: June 15: L. FRANK MANRIQUEZ: Artist, Writer, Tribal Scholar- AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 06/15/2011

L. FRANK MANRIQUEZ (Tongva-Acjachemen) – Artist, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist, and indigenous language activis

L. Frank is the nom d'arte of c artist, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist, and indigenous language activist. She lives and works in California.

In 1990, L. Frank was Artist in Residence at the Headland Center for the Arts in Sausalito, California; her artwork has been exhibited widely throughout California and appears in several publications.

Her regular column/graphic, "Acorn Soup," has appeared in the quarterly newsletter News from Native California[2] since 1992. "Acorn Soup" features the comic adventures of Coyote in his various guises.

FPR's Laura Waterman Wittstock and Richard LaFortune (with Andy Driscoll) talk with Ms. Manriquez about her work, her quest and her Two-Spirit activism.


55:24 minutes (50.72 MB)

First Person Radio:Nov 10: ANTON TREUER: Ojibwe Language Teacher and Advocate-AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Wed, 11/10/2010

Dr. Anton Treuer (pronounced troy-er) is Professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University. He has a B.A. from Princeton University, M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He is Editor of the Oshkaabewis (pronounced o-shkaah-bay-wis) Native Journal, the only academic journal of the Ojibwe language. His published books include Ojibwe in Minnesota (2010), The Assassination of Hole in the Day (2010), Awesiinyensag: Dibaajimowinan Ji-gikinoo’amaageng (2010), Living Our Language: Ojibwe Tales & Oral Histories (2001), Aaniin Ekidong: Ojibwe Vocabulary Project (2009), and Omaa Akiing (2002). Dr. Treuer has sat on many organizational boards, ranging from the White Earth Land Recovery Project to MeritCare Health System.

Dr. Treuer has received prestigious awards and fellowships from the American Philosophical Society, National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Minnesota Historical Society, the Minnesota Humanities Commission, the Experienced Faculty Development Program, the Institute for the Study of World Politics, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Grotto Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Bush Foundation, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.


53:48 minutes (24.63 MB)