small business

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DATE CORRECT: TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

 

TruthToTell, Monday, March 25-9AM: SPREADING JUSTICE: Idle No More Unites & Confronts; REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

Here in the United States, the Canadian-originated Idle No More movement has had little mainstream media play, but spreading anger among Native communities of both countries over continued exploitation of what they maintain are indigenous lands – lands ceded to colonial powers in exchange for preserved protection of those lands for all future generations – especially that of the land, air and waters “and all creation.”

Canada’s Indians – called Aboriginals – comprising First NationsMétis and Inuit peoples – initiated the Idle No More movement largely in response to Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government rewriting of the critical Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) of 1882, loosening built-in restrictions on “construction of any kind …(taking) place in or around any water which could, in principle, be navigated by any kind of floating craft. Under the newly-named NPA, the approval process would only be required for development around one of a vastly circumscribed list of waterways set by the Minister of Transportation. Many of the newly deregulated waterways passed through traditional First Nations land.” (Wikipedia entry on Idle No More – for a much more detailed explanation of this campaign).

Needless to say, navigable waters salt the whole of the Canadian landscape, giving the NWPA more importance for First Nations as an instrument of environmental protection – but which would be gutted and many protections removed under Harper’s C-45 bill – a 450-page part ofso-calleed Omnibus bills package to smooth the way for much more industrial development.

In fact, as First Nations people see it, the NPA rewrite has legitimized one of the great and egregious violations of indigenous sovereignty over those protections has been the Canadian Government’s “…campaign for approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines Project, a proposal to build a pipeline for bitumen condensate connecting the Athabasca tar sands with the Pacific Ocean, facilitating unprocessed bitumen exports to China.” (Ibid.)

This is the origin of infamous Keystone Pipeline – now familiar to US residents, not to mention the American Indian community in solidarity with their Canada-based brothers and sisters. (The US and Canada are not precisely recognized as separate countries under the concept of indigenism and the designation of all North America as Turtle Island – home to all Native peoples in this hemisphere.)

Idle No More is leading the protests over tar sands oil development and the shipment of this expensively extracted crude oil down through the US by way of the Keystone Pipeline.

Even though the Senate overwhelmingly approved the pipeline in the early hours of Saturday’s marathon budget session with a mixture of Republican and vulnerable Democratic incumbents in 2014, President Obama has held off on his approval of the Keystone which would traverse the Dakotas and other Midwestern states. (It’s possible the lame duck President will not approve, letting those Dems off the hook in both left and right camps.)

The Idle No More movement has been inspired in large measure “…by the liquid diet hunger strikeof Attawapiskat Cree Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. Solidarity sessions have sprung up throughout Canada and the US, including last Friday’s symposium in Minneapolis’ American Indian Center on these issues and featuring many speakers connected not only to resisting the Keystone pipeline and tar sands oil extraction in general, but by others battling  other environmental threats, one of which we have covered extensively – the introduction of sulfide mining – copper and nickel – in Minnesota’s North Country and newer iron ore mining operations sought for the Penokee Mountains of Northern Wisconsin.

Attawapiskat Grand Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Attawapiskat Elder Ray Robinson, far left, Nina Wilson (with yellow shirt), Marty Cobenais (right behind)

Under the top layers Northeastern Minnesota lands and lakes – much of it part of areas ceded but still protected against fouling by treaties over century-and-a-half old – lies a large and rich lode of those precious metals, extraction of which could turn the waters of the entire area to sulfuric acid and kill off the lakes we all deem precious and Indians consider sacred for their Manoomin (wild rice) stands.

The issues are many and complex – often colliding with corporate and governmental powers now seen as an extension of the persistent colonialism around Native lands and peoples in both countries. – aided and abetted by state and local politicians under duress from labor unions trying to rekindle a job market for miners and related craftsmen long idled (pardon the pun) by the Great Recession of 2008 and their slow or stagnant growth in employment opportunities.

Of course, the same can be said of Indians residing throughout those same areas. State legislators from the Iron Range and DFLers still reliant on labor support for reelection have joined with mining companies and the Departments of National Resources and the Pollution Control Agency to advance Minnesota’s exploitation of those resources for jobs and the billions awaiting those companies under the crust and cover of lands up north.

Idle No More was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon. While no one personality is leading the movement, these women and their supporters are traveling around. The idea’s caught on and the name usurped as the basis for political action at many levels – right down to a high school in Minneapolis.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with leaders of the movement – locally and internationally – about the successes and the struggles of Turtle Islanders to preserve the environmental integrity of their lands and waters under the Idle No More rubric – and how the contagion of solidarity is taking hold.

GUESTS:

NINA WILSON (Ojibwe) – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Co-Founder, Idle No More

RAY ROBINSON (Cree/Anishinaabe) – Grand Elder from Quebec

PATRICIA SHEPARD, MSW (Prairie Band Potawatomi/Ojibwe), Minneapolis, founder of the Native Youth Crisis Hotline; Honor the Youth Organization Project Coordinator.

WINONA VIZENOR (Ojibwe) – South High School Student – Minneapolis

No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

 

REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II-Monday March 18, 9AM–Health Insurance Exchanges - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming @ KFAI.org

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis). Here is the description of that program:

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, orMA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN MinneapolisCable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes ofCommunity Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

REPEAT SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II- March 18–Health Insurance Exchanges - AUDIO & VIDEO HERE

On-air date: 
Mon, 03/18/2013

 

This is a repeat of TruthToTell: Community Connection series originally broadcast LIVE on KFAI last Wednesday, March 13th  from the WILDER FOUNDATION and to be televised Monday night at 8:00 on SPNN Channel 19 (St. Paul) and MTN Channel 16 (Minneapolis)

(WATCH VIDEO HERE-<http://bit.ly/TTT-HealthExchVIDEO>)

Here is the description of that program 

The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts took place on March 13, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building in Saint Paul near University Ave starting. This important discussion featured key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, or MA. MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). Wednesday was the first of our live productions.

GUESTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – Co-Chair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

SPECIAL TruthToTell: Community Connections II–Health Insurance Exchanges under “Obamacare” Taping/Airing March 13th at the Wilder Foundation–St. Paul

On-air date: 
Wed, 03/13/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

COME JOIN THE CONVERSATION on HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGES!!!

LIVE FROM THE WILDER FOUNDATION this WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH. BE THERE BY 6:30PM.


The second in our series and first of these live broadcasts will take place on March 13th, originating from the Wilder Foundation Building (map) at 451 Lexington Parkway in Saint Paul near University Ave starting at 6:30PM. This important discussion will cover the key players in the development of the Health Insurance Exchanges mandated by the 2010 Affordable Care Act. ALL Minnesotans are invited and encouraged to join the audience that night ... or LISTEN in at 7:00 PM on KFAI FM 90.3/106.7 or streamed at www.KFAI.org.

Most Minnesotans now meet their healthcare needs through HMO's – nonprofit Health Maintenance Organizations – groups like BlueCross Blue Shield or Health Partners – or private Fee-for-Service Plans. Many get all or part of their health insurance through their employers – a dwindling benefit for most. Thousands get none of those benefits at all. Several other plans serve us here:

129,000 residents are covered through MinnesotaCare. MinnesotaCare is a publicly subsidized program for mostly working residents with no other access to affordable health care coverage. Members pay a monthly premium on a sliding scale based on their income.

Another 26,000 Minnesotans are covered by the little-known Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, or MCHA. MCHA offers individual coverage to state residents the private market has turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing condition.

Yet another 733,000  – fully 14% of the state's population – are on Medical Assistance, or MA.MA is Minnesota's version of Medicaid. Eligibility is based on income. For example, a single adult making less than $700 a month may be eligible for MA.

Still, nearly 440,000 – about 8% of all Minnesotans – have no health insurance at all.

Come 2014, however, the healthcare landscape in Minnesota will change – dramatically.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law almost exactly three years ago – March 23, 2010. In 2014, a new way to get health coverage will be what the act calls the Health Insurance Marketplace - what we call Health Insurance Exchanges.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, are bringing to live audiences – right in their neighborhoods/communities – conversations on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics.

We've added an important perspective to our conversation today, Tuesday, March 12 - that of progressive small businesses.**

TruthToTell: Community Connections  and CivicMedia/MN are partnering with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners** to present these discussions and dialogues for radio, television and online distribution. Each program is recorded live before a studio audience the second Wednesday of every month and aired the following Monday – in TruthToTell’s regular slot at 9:00 AM on KFAI, 90.3FM, Minneapolis, 106.7FM, St. Paul, and online at KFAI.org, and at 8:00 PM on television on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16.

KFAI Radio (FM90.3/106.7 and streamed live at KFAI.org) will occasionally air episodes of Community Connections live on selected Second Wednesday evenings at 7pm (check our websites for which). This coming Wednesday is the first of our live productions.

GUEST PANELISTS:

SARAH GREENFIELD – Health Care Program Manager for TakeAction/Minnesota and policy lead on Health Benefits Exchanges at the Legislature

PAUL SOBOCINSKI – Rural Health Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project based in Wabasso, Minnesota

ELIZABETH FROST, MD – CoChair, Physicians for a National Health Plan - Minnesota

**AUDREY BRITTON – Board Member, Small Business Minnesota

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author; TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

A craggy mesa once housed Monument No. 2, the hottest, richest, most productive uranium mine in the Navajo homeland, in a remote desert near the Arizona-Utah line. To the families who have dwelled for generations in the spring-fed valley below, the mesa is the wounded center of their world. They and the hundreds of Indians who labored at the mine have been forever changed by the government’s desperate press for more nuclear weapons than any other nation on Earth.

Yellow Dirt is their story.

It is the saga of four generations whose lives have been shaped by uranium.
What happened at Monument No. 2 was repeated in communities across the reservation. Despite warnings from doctors and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners worked unprotected. Long after the uranium boom ended, the neighbors continued to live with contamination. The radioactive “yellow dirt” ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, their bread ovens, their churches and even their garbage dumps.

Few knew what had happened until Judy Pasternak wrote a prizewinning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful Congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage.

In Yellow Dirt, Pasternak provides gripping new details. She introduces the family of Adakai the Gambler, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose fates were intertwined with that of Monument No. 2 and with decisions made without their knowledge in distant capitals and labs. She weaves the personal and the political into a chronicle of betrayal, of willful negligence, and ultimately, of reckoning.

Join us on September 7th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with award winning author Judy Pasternak about her stunning book: Yellow Dirt: An American Story of a Poisoned Land and a People Betrayed. The book examines in depth the effects of uranium mining on the Dine (Navajo) lands, looking closely at what happened to several families who built houses using contaminated materials and drank from water poisoned with uranium. The book is a must read for everyone in Indian Country and those concerned about Indian lands and rights.
Judy Pasternak is an editor with Bloomberg News in Washington and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote about subjects ranging from a band of right-wing extremist bank robbers to the giant black hole at the center of the Milky Way.Yellow Dirt, her first book, made two "Best of 2010" lists: Publisher's Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. The book has also won awards for literary non-fiction, investigative journalism and environmental journalism. She is married, with one son.
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TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO HERE; VIDEO ARCHIVE HERE

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down; First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO Link Below

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down-KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org/Livestream.com

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

When the inevitable development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO HERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota and the Department's Community Outreach Coordinator, Miguel Vargas. 

At the University of Minnesota, Child was recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. She was born on and remains a citizen of the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

Miguel Vargas has been Outreach Coordinator since Fall 2007. He coordinates the Ojibwemodaa Eta! Language Programs and Scholarships, outreaching to K-12 Schools/Youth Programs for visiting opportunities, and moderating the Minnesota Indian Affairs Listserv (MINN-IND).

TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO BELOW; VIDEO UNDER ARCHIVES

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/05/2011

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our Homes; Central Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION



57:04 minutes (52.25 MB)