troubadour

CORRECTION: First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 28 @9AM: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 7: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 28: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice - Listen Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/28/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's new release is available at http://www.larrylong.org/.


46:36 minutes (42.67 MB)