TruthToTell

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10-9-13 TruthToTell: Community Connections VIII- Who runs Minneapolis, Who should?

Who are the key people, or institutions that are making things happen in Minnesota's biggest city? More importantly, we'll discuss with our panelists and audience members 'Who should run Minneapolis?' We'll consider what all of our roles are as citizen, voters, tax-payers, parents, students, and the like. How do we make Minneapolis a city that truly works for everyone?

VIKINGS STADIUM: Skirting the Voters Legal?

While the state and Stadium Authority wrangle with the Wilf family over the latter's personal and business financials before it approves a new Viking Stadium, a Hennepin County District Court case is asking a judge to order enforcement of a City Charter provision for a public vote on any city expenditure of $10 million or more on private entities has been awaiting a ruling.

Encore - TruthToTell: Community Connections- Insert Your Ideas Here- The Twin Cities Youth Empowerment Forum

On-air date: 
Mon, 07/15/2013

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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VIDEO: YouTube or watch our broadcast on SPNN St. Paul cable channel 19 or MTN Minneapolis cable channel 16 at 8pm CST, Monday, July 15. 

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!

That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

 


In the sixth edition of the TruthToTell:Community Connections Series*, we look to the youth.TruthToTell's Michelle Alimoradi and special guest RayLynn Prokasky will host a conversation at St Paul's Avalon Charter School on Wednesday, July 10 about how to help youth help themselves. In this era of rapidly changing technology, widening access to information, an unsure economic future, and drastically changing ethnic and racial demographics, is it time to start radically rethinking our systems for preparing and supporting young people? Do we rely on test scores and statistics to tell us what's wrong? Or should we go straight to the source and ask youth what they want to achieve? Local researchers, including the McKnight foundation’s recent spin-off Youthprise, are saying that perhaps it's a mix of both, but this Wednesday night, we'll talk to members of the community, particularly the younger Twin Cities residents, find out what they think.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

Vested community members of all ages are welcome to attend this open forum discussion as we help youth define the terms of their own success, discuss what's working, and what barriers still exist for youth struggling to achieve their goals. TTT has teamed up with St. Paul Parks & Recreation's Youth Job Corps program, Minneapolis Step-Up, Youthprise, St. Paul Sprockets, The Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College, Youth Express, and Cookie Cart as well as our production partners St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) and KFAI Fresh Air Radio to bring you this special discussion.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

Our panelists, speaking from their various experience levels of working with youth, researching youth habits, or being engaged in their communities as a young person.

 

Caritza Mariani- Caritza directs youth work for the Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College.

Jeron Mariani- Jeron Mariani is a 2013 graduate of Saint Paul Academy, a Board Member and Leadership Team member of Youthrive, a youth leadership-based nonprofit organization that focuses on peace-building skills following the vision of Nobel Peace Laureates.

Rhiannon Magee- Rhiannon is an entering sophomore at Avalon High School, an active member of the student congress, and active volunteer in her community serving at the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota (DSAM) and the AFS study abroad program.

 

Paris Curruthers – Member of the Youth Innovator Collective at Youthprise

Naomi Montgomery- Marketing Intern at Cookie Cart, and Psychology Major at Metropolitan State

 

 

62:01 minutes (56.78 MB)

TruthToTell, Monday July 8 - 9AM: CHATs and THE BACKYARD INITIATIVE: Community Health Building; TruthToTell, July 1: MINNESOTA MARIJUANA: Medical and Moral Dilemma

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, July 8, 2013

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us@TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US with Just $10 – DONATE HERE!

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Sometimes one is brought up short by the sheer numbers of remarkable efforts of Twin Cities communities or neighborhoods to improve life and return to the same level of collective existence under which almost all of our forebears operated, sometime in small towns, sometimes in ethnic and spiritual enclaves within very large cities, sometimes in small fiefdoms in developing areas of the world. Such is the case with the Back Yard Initiative (BYI) in South Minneapolis.

The American experience, we can admit, especially now as we examine our cultural and political history in light of the near two and a half centuries of what the colonial system brought forth to this nation. We say, examine less than universally celebrate because not all parts of what has always purported to be cemented equity in our Constitution has borne the fruits of that equity in reality.

There’s more to be said about that, of course, but the one ingredient lost since pioneer families settled these lands and worked side-by-side to create communities of immigrants, often at the expense of the Natives already planted there, was the sense that to really accomplish the better life for their members and their offspring, functions of a society were necessarily collective efforts, not characterized by the individualism that has rent us from each other over time, too many left to fend for themselves in a so-called democracy gone rogue. And, so, any effort to reestablish the connectedness needed to maintain the health of communities, some of them neglected in the extreme, has to be welcome in those urban places where the difficulties of existence multiply too quickly.

So was revived the concept of the Back Yard and how that symbolizes this return to collective action for community benefits and, while this may take place in some other places around the Twin Cities Metro and other locales, the Back Yard Initiative of South Minneapolis emerges as an extraordinary example of how neighborhood and community folks can come together in pockets of human endeavor to build the better overall health of the entire area – physically

Born with seed money from the Midtown headquarters of Allina Health Systems (which community folk boast is in their backyard), the system known as the Cultural Wellness Center (CWC), a broadbased effort with a mission “to unleash the power of citizens to heal themselves and to build community.” Community Action Health Teams, orCHATs were developed to help nurture the mission across a wide swath of both Minneapolis and St. Paul.

From this base came the Back Yard Initiative covering seven primary neighborhoods of Southeast Minneapolis (Powderhorn, Corcoran, Central and the four Phillips neighborhoods of West, East, Midtown and Ventura Village) and over 15,000 households. The BYI fostered what they call their three pillars of community health – Community’s Commission on Health (Leadership), the Community Resource Body (Economic leveraging) and severalCHATs.

Three BYI CHATs will visit TruthToTell this week to talk about their work: Anchor Families, Project S.E.L.F., and the Communities of Light (part of the Rebirthing Community CHAT). This whole thing can sort of blow you away with its complexities because the sheer diversity of people and CHAT programs cover almost every facet of community health stabilization.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL talks with key members of those three BYI CHATs and we’ll hear some African drumming, along with announcements of the annual Midtown Global Market Music Festival July 13th and the separate Midtown Phillips Festival coming up on July 20.

GUESTS:

KHUSABA SEKA – Representing Anchor Families CHAT

AMGED YUSEF – Representing Project S.E.L.F. CHAT (with BROTHER MAO on Drum)

 

 

 


QUEEN INSHALLAH TOLBERT – Representing Communities of Light, part of the Rebirthing Communities CHAT

 

 


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SUSAN GUST – The Alley Newspaper – Communications CHAT

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DAN WILDER – Representing the Midtown Phillips Festival

AND YOU!!! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, July 1, 2013

 

HELP US INFORM YOU  – DONATE HERE!

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VIDEO OF THIS SHOW HERE and HERE

 

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

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Some questions begging for your comments. Listen to or watch our show and answerthese questions in our survey - or in our comments section or email them to andydriscoll@TruthToTell.org. We'll make sure our guests and their organizations and the policymakers get your answers:

1. Do you support medical marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

2. Do you support recreational use of marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

3. Have you tried marijuana?  If so, what was your experience? Answer HERE.

4. Has the War on Drugs hurt our society or helped our society?  Yes / No Why? Answer HERE.

5. What do you think of private prisons lobbying against the legalization of marijuana? Answer HERE.

6. Henry Ford made a car from hemp fibers.  He said, "Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?" Should this be considered for future policies on marijuana?  Answer HERE.

7. Is there an aspect to the legalization of marijuana discussion that is missing?  If so, what is it?  Answer HERE.

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What a difference a year can make.

When last we visited this issue of marijuana legalization, we tapped the Minnesota Chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) to explain just why this controversial weed, as many call it, should be legalized or decriminalized in this state. We come back to this not because of any major shift in state policy –yet – but because the subject has again gained currency with both the introduction of medial marijuana bills here and the passage of significant changes in four other states last Fall.

Although some state legislatures– twelve this year to be exact – have either affirmatively rejected or allowed to die bills to legalize even the medical use of cannabis, last fall three states’ electorates voted not only to decriminalize marijuana, they passed initiatives or referenda legalizing its regulated recreational use. Montana and Massachusetts passed medical marijuana reform initiatives. And Colorado and Washington legalized personal use of marijuana outright for those 21 and over.

Bills to authorize medical marijuana in Minnesota, introduced in both houses last Session (SF 1641/HF 1818), remain in their respective Health and Human Services committees, because they were introduced too late in the session, but because Minnesota works on a biennial legislative calendar, the bills stay alive through next year's session.

At the moment, Minnesota ranks the personal possession or sale of less than 1.5 ounces or 42.5 grams of marijuana a misdemeanor calling for a maximum $200 penalty, dischargeable for first “offenders.” Anything more than that amount and possession and sales become felonies and the penalties, depending on the quantity and where you’ve bought and/or sold it can go through the roof – anywhere from 5 years and $5,000 to 30 years and $1 million.

Tough stuff for a drug that’s been described as tame compared with the ramifications of alcohol use and abuse. Yes, alcohol. According to NORML, which some will dispute, such agencies as the National Academy of Sciences, the Connecticut Law Review Commission and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan all found that decriminalization causes no substantial increase either in marijuana use or the use of other substances, including alcohol. The British, Dutch and Australians concluded much the same.

This begs the question of what effect the entire so-called Drug War industry is having on public policy and therefore public opinion.

It should be noted that five Mayo physicians issued one warning just a couple of weeks ago that “An increasingly available option for medical patients suffering chronic pain -- medical marijuana -- should be avoided by teens.” However, it also states that their commentary  – “…to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings – relies on findings from cases involving three high school-age patients at Mayo's pediatric chronic pain clinic, who said they used marijuana regularly.” Note that this data comes from the experience of three teen patients.

It would take several pages (hours) to quote studies done in the US and Europe that refute the claims of those who denounce even the use of small amounts as “reefer madness” setting in, corrupting our children and inviting rapid addiction to the worst of the controlled substances, such as heroin and cocaine.

We thought it worthwhile to come back to this subject after last Fall’s election and this last Minnesota Legislative session’s introduction of measures to legalize medical marijuana, and this time to bring one of the suffering witnesses from that session’s testimony to talk to us about his experience as well.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI quiz the patient, the state senator and some other advocates and observers over the momentum behind medical marijuana as well as the hopes for complete decriminalization in Minnesota.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR SCOTT DIBBLE (DFL-Mpls 61) – Author, Medical Marijuana Senate File 1641; Chair, Transportation and Public Safety Committee and Chair of Transportation and Public Safety Division of Finance. (Sen. Dibble also authored the Marriage for All bill.)

KURTIS HANNA –  Executive Director, MN NORML

 

 

 

KATIE RUCKE – Editorial Assistant and Staff Writer, Mint Press News – specializing in health, criminal justice, education, whistleblowers and watchdog investigations.

PATRICK McCLELLAN, Burnsville – Sufferer from mitochondrial myopathy, a rare, genetic muscular disorder that causes severe, painful spasms.


 

TruthToTell, Monday, July 1−9AM: MINNESOTA MARIJUANA: Medical and Moral Dilemma; TruthToTell, June 24: ENCORE: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS V: Deeper Issues of Sulfide Mining – Audio and Video BELOW

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, July 1, 2013

 

Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 


What a difference a year can make.

When last we visited this issue of marijuana legalization, we tapped the Minnesota Chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) to explain just why this controversial weed, as many call it, should be legalized or decriminalized in this state. We come back to this not because of any major shift in state policy –yet – but because the subject has again gained currency with both the introduction of medial marijuana bills here and the passage of significant changes in four other states last Fall.

Although some state legislatures– twelve this year to be exact – have either affirmatively rejected or allowed to die bills to legalize even the medical use of cannabis, last fall three states’ electorates voted not only to decriminalize marijuana, they passed initiatives or referenda legalizing its regulated recreational use. Montana and Massachusetts passed medical marijuana reform initiatives. And Colorado and Washington legalized personal use of marijuana outright for those 21 and over.

Minnesota hasn’t gone anywhere near that far. Bills to authorize medical marijuana in Minnesota, introduced in both houses last Session (SF 1641/HF 1818), failed to exit their respective Health and Human committees, despite Minnesota’s status as still having active bills, likely because we work on a biennial legislative

At the moment, Minnesota ranks the personal possession or sale of less than 1.5 ounces or 42.5 grams of marijuana a misdemeanor calling for a maximum $200 penalty, dischargeable for first “offenders.” Anything more than that amount and possession and sales become felonies and the penalties, depending on the quantity and where you’ve bought and/or sold it can go through the roof – anywhere from 5 years and $5,000 to 30 years and $1 million.

Tough stuff for a drug that’s been described as tame compared with the ramifications of alcohol use and abuse. Yes, alcohol. According to NORML, which some will dispute, such agencies as the National Academy of Sciences, the Connecticut Law Review Commission and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan all found that decriminalization causes no substantial increase either in marijuana use or the use of other substances, including alcohol. The British, Dutch and Australians concluded much the same.

This begs the question of what effect the entire so-called Drug War industry is having on public policy and therefore public opinion.

It should be noted that five Mayo physicians issued one warning just a couple of weeks ago that “An increasingly available option for medical patients suffering chronic pain -- medical marijuana -- should be avoided by teens.” However, it also states that their commentary  – “…to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings – relies on findings from cases involving three high school-age patients at Mayo's pediatric chronic pain clinic, who said they used marijuana regularly.” Note that this data comes from the experience of three teen patients.

It would take several pages (hours) to quote studies done in the US and Europe that refute the claims of those who denounce even the use of small amounts as “reefer madness” setting in, corrupting our children and inviting rapid addiction to the worst of the controlled substances, such as heroin and cocaine.

We thought it worthwhile to come back to this subject after last Fall’s election and this last Minnesota Legislative session’s introduction of measures to legalize medical marijuana, and this time to bring one of the suffering witnesses from that session’s testimony to talk to us about his experience as well.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI quiz the patient, the state senator and some other advocates and observers over the momentum behind medical marijuana as well as the hopes for complete decriminalization in Minnesota.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR SCOTT DIBBLE (DFL-Mpls 61) – Author, Medical Marijuana Senate File 1641; Chair, Transportation and Public Safety Committee and Chair of Transportation and Public Safety Division of Finance. (Sen. Dibble also authored the Marriage for All bill.)

KURTIS HANNA –  Executive Director, MN NORML

 

 

 

KATIE RUCKE – Editorial Assistant and Staff Writer, Mint Press News – specializing in health, criminal justice, education, whistleblowers and watchdog investigations.

PATRICK McCLELLAN, Burnsville – Sufferer from mitochondrial myopathy, a rare, genetic muscular disorder that causes severe, painful spasms.

 


AND YOU!!! Call and join this conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO: YouTube or TTT VIDEO ARCHIVE

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TruthToTell and CivicMedia/Minnesota traveled to the University of Minnesota at Duluth (UMD) to air/televise the 5th in our series of LIVE Community Connections forums the night of June 12 in the auditorium of the Labovitz School of Business & Economics (LSBE) –this one on the impacts of copper/nickel mining enterprises on Northeastern Minnesota lives and natural resources just as a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed PolyMet sulfide mine will be released prior permitting by the MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Army Corps of Engineers.

Producer/Host Andy Driscoll and Associate Producer/Co-host Michelle Alimoradi, in concert with community and media partners, brought Community Connections to affected residents of neighborhoods/communities, conversations that strike at the heart of the state’s quality of life, as well as its integrity in protecting the longstanding treaties negotiated with Minnesota’s many Indian tribes over the ability to manage the resources of those lands for the benefit of all residents. At risk may well be the planet's entire supply of true wild rice–manoomin–as a sacred crop of Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Natives.

Community Partners signing on to help CMM and TTT produce this televised conversation among panelists and constituents immediately impacted if these new mines are permitted were the Master of Advocacy & Political Leadership (MAPL)Program at UMD; KUMD RadioWaterLegacyFriends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; and Friends of the Cloquet Valley State Forest with cooperation of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and some labor unions serving the area.  

 GUESTS:

Nancy Schuldt, Water Resource Policy Director for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Paula Maccabee, Policy Director for WaterLegacy


 

 

 Aaron Klemz, Policy and Communications Director for the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

 Tamara Jones, President of the Carlton County Central Labor Body and a Union Rep for the United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1189

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*TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI community radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

CivicMedia-Minnesota is a 501c3 non-profit production company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, created to bring civic and media literacy to the Twin Cities region and Minnesota, informing, educating and empowering residents and students in local, state and regional public affairs and to amplify the voices of concerned  communities on key issues facing them every day. CMM’s main goal is to engage citizens by helping them understand issues of governance and public policy, critique media coverage of critical policy matters, encourage public discourse and help people take collective action to resolve problems and influence public policy. More information and past show archives can be found at www.truthtotell.org.

 

TruthToTell, July 1: MINNESOTA MARIJUANA: Medical and Moral Dilemma - VIDEO & AUDIO PODCAST Links HERE

On-air date: 
Mon, 07/01/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

HELP US INFORM YOU  – DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIDEO OF THIS SHOW HERE and HERE

 

AND NOW: The KFAI Community Radio App is now up and running!!
That means you can now hear TruthToTell – live – on your mobile - currently available for Android (http://bit.ly/KFAIonAndroid), iPhone (http://bit.ly/TTTon_iPhone), and iPad (http://bit.ly/TTT-on-iPad) mobile devices.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Some questions begging for your comments. Listen to or watch our show and answer these questions in our survey - or in our comments section or email them to andydriscoll@TruthToTell.org. We'll make sure our guests and their organizations and the policymakers get your answers:

1. Do you support medical marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

2. Do you support recreational use of marijuana? Why / Why not? Answer HERE.

3. Have you tried marijuana?  If so, what was your experience? Answer HERE.

4. Has the War on Drugs hurt our society or helped our society?  Yes / No Why? Answer HERE.

5. What do you think of private prisons lobbying against the legalization of marijuana? Answer HERE.

6. Henry Ford made a car from hemp fibers.  He said, "Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?" Should this be considered for future policies on marijuana?  Answer HERE.

7. Is there an aspect to the legalization of marijuana discussion that is missing?  If so, what is it?  Answer HERE.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What a difference a year can make.

When last we visited this issue of marijuana legalization, we tapped the Minnesota Chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) to explain just why this controversial weed, as many call it, should be legalized or decriminalized in this state. We come back to this not because of any major shift in state policy –yet – but because the subject has again gained currency with both the introduction of medial marijuana bills here and the passage of significant changes in four other states last Fall.

Although some state legislatures– twelve this year to be exact – have either affirmatively rejected or allowed to die bills to legalize even the medical use of cannabis, last fall three states’ electorates voted not only to decriminalize marijuana, they passed initiatives or referenda legalizing its regulated recreational use. Montana and Massachusetts passed medical marijuana reform initiatives. And Colorado and Washington legalized personal use of marijuana outright for those 21 and over.

Bills to authorize medical marijuana in Minnesota, introduced in both houses last Session (SF 1641/HF 1818), remain in their respective Health and Human Services committees, because they were introduced too late in the session, but because Minnesota works on a biennial legislative calendar, the bills stay alive through next year's session.

At the moment, Minnesota ranks the personal possession or sale of less than 1.5 ounces or 42.5 grams of marijuana a misdemeanor calling for a maximum $200 penalty, dischargeable for first “offenders.” Anything more than that amount and possession and sales become felonies and the penalties, depending on the quantity and where you’ve bought and/or sold it can go through the roof – anywhere from 5 years and $5,000 to 30 years and $1 million.

Tough stuff for a drug that’s been described as tame compared with the ramifications of alcohol use and abuse. Yes, alcohol. According to NORML, which some will dispute, such agencies as the National Academy of Sciences, the Connecticut Law Review Commission and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan all found that decriminalization causes no substantial increase either in marijuana use or the use of other substances, including alcohol. The British, Dutch and Australians concluded much the same.

This begs the question of what effect the entire so-called Drug War industry is having on public policy and therefore public opinion.

It should be noted that five Mayo physicians issued one warning just a couple of weeks ago that “An increasingly available option for medical patients suffering chronic pain -- medical marijuana -- should be avoided by teens.” However, it also states that their commentary  – “…to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings – relies on findings from cases involving three high school-age patients at Mayo's pediatric chronic pain clinic, who said they used marijuana regularly.” Note that this data comes from the experience of three teen patients.

It would take several pages (hours) to quote studies done in the US and Europe that refute the claims of those who denounce even the use of small amounts as “reefer madness” setting in, corrupting our children and inviting rapid addiction to the worst of the controlled substances, such as heroin and cocaine.

We thought it worthwhile to come back to this subject after last Fall’s election and this last Minnesota Legislative session’s introduction of measures to legalize medical marijuana, and this time to bring one of the suffering witnesses from that session’s testimony to talk to us about his experience as well.

TTT’S ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI quiz the patient, the state senator and some other advocates and observers over the momentum behind medical marijuana as well as the hopes for complete decriminalization in Minnesota.

GUESTS:

STATE SENATOR SCOTT DIBBLE (DFL-Mpls 61) – Author, Medical Marijuana Senate File 1641; Chair, Transportation and Public Safety Committee and Chair of Transportation and Public Safety Division of Finance. (Sen. Dibble also authored the Marriage for All bill.)

KURTIS HANNA –  Executive Director, MN NORML

 

 

 

KATIE RUCKE – Editorial Assistant and Staff Writer, Mint Press News – specializing in health, criminal justice, education, whistleblowers and watchdog investigations.

PATRICK McCLELLAN, Burnsville – Sufferer from mitochondrial myopathy, a rare, genetic muscular disorder that causes severe, painful spasms.