TruthToTell

TruthToTell Feb 27@9AM: HENNEPIN COUNTY BURNER: Renewable Energy? Or Deadly Polluter? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell Feb 27@9AM: HENNEPIN COUNTY BURNER: Renewable Energy? Or Deadly Polluter? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org

Should Hennepin County garbage burner operator Covanta Energy be allowed to increase its burning volume by almost 20%?

State  and city permits currently allow Hennepin County and Covanta to incinerate 1,000 tons of Minneapolis and near-ring suburban garbage at the HERC (Hennepin Energy Resource Center) facility in the heart of downtown (in Target Field’s backyard, so to speak). Covanta and the county want to up that by 212 tons per day, the maximum the plant could handle.

Here’s what Hennepin County’s HERC page proclaims (boldface ours):

About 365,000 tons of garbage (1,000 per day) is burned at HERC to provide enough electricity for 25,000 homes each year. Electricity generated at HERC is sold to Xcel Energy. (Covanta labels the 33.7 megawatts they sell to Xcel Energy as “renewable”.)

Through the steam line, HERC provides enough steam for the annual natural gas needs of 1,500 homes to buildings in downtown Minneapolis and Target Field.

Residents and businesses in Hennepin County generate 1 million tons of garbage every year. Processing waste at HERC is an environmentally preferable alternative to landfilling waste.

More than 11,000 tons of ferrous metal are recovered every year at HERC and recycled.

Processing one ton of waste at HERC prevents the release of one ton of greenhouse gas emissions. Since HERC opened in 1990, processing waste has prevented the release of 3 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

Is burning garbage really the best way to a) manage our waste without landfilling it? and/or b) generate electricity or other forms of energy? Whatever happened to the recycling, composting and reducing waste targets developed years ago now? Is this WTE – waste-to-energy – system the healthiest alternative?

Burned materials of all kinds pour pollutants into the air we breathe – and choke on, creating unprecedented percentages of respiratory problems in children and adults, especially adults with chronic health problems.

Lead, cadmium and other heavy metals are released into the air over Minneapolis and blow in different directions at different times of the year, settling in the systems of residents all around the Twin Cities. Remember, this is added to other burning and pollutants from other sources, including energy and manufacturing companies dotting the Metro.

Even with all the money generated for Hennepin County by this burning operation, can the health protection mandate of the county and the state justify such data as an 11.4% rate of children’s asthma in Minneapolis or 9.2% county-wide?

Two years ago, the Minneapolis Planning Commission bucked its own staff’s recommendation and turned down Covanta’s and Hennepin’s request for changing the city’s conditional use permit to allow for the increased burning. Covanta started to appeal that decision to the City Council, but could see the media coverage and count the votes on the City Council Zoning and Planning Committee and pulled it back to consult with the Pollution Control Agency about modifying THAT permit to burn.

Their appeal was coming up again in Minneapolis this month - now they’ve asked for another extension for that – to October. Anti-burning advocates and other environmentalists are pressing hard to keep any more garbage from being burnt there, insisting that all burning, not just the increase, is killing people. (Watch an interview between guests Lara Norkus-Crampton and Rep. Frank Hornstein.)

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with anti burner and anti-burning advocates and two of the legislators who support them.

GUESTS:

 State Rep KAREN CLARK (DFL-Mpls), RN – Public health nurse; DFL Lead Housing: MN House Jobs and Economic Development Finance Committee; Executive Director, Women’s Environmental Institute

State Rep. FRANK HORNSTEIN (DFL-Mpls) – Minnesota House Ways and Means; M.A., urban and environmental policy

 LARA NORKUS-CRAMPTON, RN – Public Health Nurse; former member, Minneapolis Planning Commission; Anti-HERC Advocate

 ALAN MULLER – Executive Director, Green Delaware; Anti-burning advocate

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TruthToTell Feb 27@9AM: HENNEPIN COUNTY BURNER: Renewable Energy? Or Deadly Polluter? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Online @KFAI.org


Should Hennepin County garbage burner operator Covanta Energy be allowed to increase its burning volume by almost 20%?

State  and city permits currently allow Hennepin County and Covanta to incinerate 1,000 tons of Minneapolis and near-ring suburban garbage at the HERC (Hennepin Energy Resource Center) facility in the heart of downtown (in Target Field’s backyard, so to speak). Covanta and the county want to up that by 212 tons per day, the maximum the plant could handle.

Here’s what Hennepin County’s HERC page proclaims (boldface ours):

About 365,000 tons of garbage (1,000 per day) is burned at HERC to provide enough electricity for 25,000 homes each year. Electricity generated at HERC is sold to Xcel Energy. (Covanta labels the 33.7 megawatts they sell to Xcel Energy as “renewable”.)

Through the steam line, HERC provides enough steam for the annual natural gas needs of 1,500 homes to buildings in downtown Minneapolis and Target Field.

Residents and businesses in Hennepin County generate 1 million tons of garbage every year. Processing waste at HERC is an environmentally preferable alternative to landfilling waste.

More than 11,000 tons of ferrous metal are recovered every year at HERC and recycled.

Processing one ton of waste at HERC prevents the release of one ton of greenhouse gas emissions. Since HERC opened in 1990, processing waste has prevented the release of 3 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

Is burning garbage really the best way to a) manage our waste without landfilling it? and/or b) generate electricity or other forms of energy? Whatever happened to the recycling, composting and reducing waste targets developed years ago now? Is this WTE – waste-to-energy – system the healthiest alternative?

Burned materials of all kinds pour pollutants into the air we breathe – and choke on, creating unprecedented percentages of respiratory problems in children and adults, especially adults with chronic health problems.

Lead, cadmium and other heavy metals are released into the air over Minneapolis and blow in different directions at different times of the year, settling in the systems of residents all around the Twin Cities. Remember, this is added to other burning and pollutants from other sources, including energy and manufacturing companies dotting the Metro.

Even with all the money generated for Hennepin County by this burning operation, can the health protection mandate of the county and the state justify such data as an 11.4% rate of children’s asthma in Minneapolis or 9.2% county-wide?

Two years ago, the Minneapolis Planning Commission bucked its own staff’s recommendation and turned down Covanta’s and Hennepin’s request for changing the city’s conditional use permit to allow for the increased burning. Covanta started to appeal that decision to the City Council, but could see the media coverage and count the votes on the City Council Zoning and Planning Committee and pulled it back to consult with the Pollution Control Agency about modifying THAT permit to burn.

Their appeal was coming up again in Minneapolis this month - now they’ve asked for another extension for that – to October. Anti-burning advocates and other environmentalists are pressing hard to keep any more garbage from being burnt there, insisting that all burning, not just the increase, is killing people. (Watch an interview between guests Lara Norkus-Crampton and Rep. Frank Hornstein.)

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with anti burner and anti-burning advocates and two of the legislators who support them.

GUESTS:

 State Rep KAREN CLARK (DFL-Mpls), RN – Public health nurse; DFL Lead Housing: MN House Jobs and Economic Development Finance Committee; Executive Director, Women’s Environmental Institute

State Rep. FRANK HORNSTEIN (DFL-Mpls) – Minnesota House Ways and Means; M.A., urban and environmental policy

 LARA NORKUS-CRAMPTON, RN – Public Health Nurse; former member, Minneapolis Planning Commission; Anti-HERC Advocate

 ALAN MULLER – Executive Director, Green Delaware; Anti-burning advocate

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TruthToTell Feb 20: SELECTING OUR JUDGES: Retention? Or Election? - Audio HERE

Minnesota’s system of electing judges once relied on an important caveat in the little known law known as the Canon of Judicial Ethics or Minnesota Code of Judicial Conduct. That caveat, known as Canon #5, prevented judicial candidates from taking political stands on issues that might well come before them as judges or justices. It was an important rule for most of the lawyers and judges – of any political persuasion –  practicing before the bar (the term for the legal community) to keep the process relatively clear of politics. Politics, they insist(ed), have no place in seeking judgeships because of the neutrality that serves as the ideal for presiding over trials and considering appeals.

Of course, it’s something of a myth that politics – or at least one’s personal and political bent – doesn’t find its way into many of the court’s judgments, but, at least campaigns for judge could speak more to qualifications for the bench and less about the way a judge would likely rule in most cases.

However, a relative minority of the legal community, more often than not from the ideological right, but certainly not limited to that stripe, argued and still argue that the public has an inherent right in elections to hear about where a judicial candidate stands on key issues facing society, or, perhaps, even how they would rule in some cases.

One Minnesota lawyer, Gregory Wersal, himself a repeated candidate for the Minnesota Supreme Court, challenged what he considered the inappropriately restrictive Canon 5 and took that case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, where he won a landmark 5-4 decision (Republican Party of MN v. White) that has since opened the door to highly politicized judicial races across the country (since most states’ Canons contained similar prohibitions).

Actually, most judges, once in office, are almost never challenged unless they committed mayhem of some sort. Those who do go after a sitting judge are considered a bit dumb because the lack of voter engagement almost always reelects the judge and the former opponent is now likely to come before this judge in a courtroom. While theoretically committed to impartiality in such cases, judges may, indeed, hold a grudge for having been dragged through an expensive and, perhaps, embarrassing campaign for reelection. Result: most sitting judges run unopposed.

This is why Wersal was considered outside the mainstream and thus dismissed as a fly in the ointment – until his argument received the blessing of the Supremes.

For many respected present and former justices and judges, this was and abandonment of the fundamental principles of English Common Law, let alone a longstanding ethic that kept the courts and campaigns for them clear of open ideological battles. While Minnesota has not quite yet descended into the degrading contests the legal community feared in opposing Wersal, nasty campaigns in Wisconsin and several other states have shown them that Minnesota, at least, should establish a satisfactory (and more dignified, to be sure) alternative to wide open elections.

Wisconsin’s degeneration into one Supreme Court justice choking his female colleague represents to many the state of the judiciary in our neighboring state.

Since then, such legal luminaries as former US Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor (who voted "aye" in the 5-4 decision and would later regret it); former Vice President Walter Mondale; former Governor Al Quie; current State Supreme Court Justice Alan Page; retired Chief Justice Kathleen Blatz (and former Republican House member); current Hennepin County Judge Kevin Burke; former Chief Judge and now president of the American Judges Association; and recently retired Chief Justice Eric Magnuson, now a regular legal representative of Republicans and Republican causes, are among many who have come forward with an entire new system of judicial selection for Minnesota – Merit Selection and Retention Elections.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL will talk with staff and officers of the Coalition for Impartial Justice about the proposed system and why it’s better than what some might call democracy.

TruthToTell Feb 27: HENNEPIN COUNTY BURNER: Renewable Energy? Or Deadly Polluter? PLUS Larry Long sings of Sulfide Mines-Listen

On-air date: 
Mon, 02/27/2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Should Hennepin County garbage burner operator Covanta Energy be allowed to increase its burning volume by almost 20%?

State  and city permits currently allow Hennepin County and Covanta to incinerate 1,000 tons of Minneapolis and near-ring suburban garbage at the HERC (Hennepin Energy Resource Center) facility in the heart of downtown (in Target Field’s backyard, so to speak). Covanta and the county want to up that by 212 tons per day, the maximum the plant could handle.

Here’s what Hennepin County’s HERC page proclaims (boldface ours):

About 365,000 tons of garbage (1,000 per day) is burned at HERC to provide enough electricity for 25,000 homes each year. Electricity generated at HERC is sold to Xcel Energy. (Covanta labels the 33.7 megawatts they sell to Xcel Energy as “renewable”.)

Through the steam line, HERC provides enough steam for the annual natural gas needs of 1,500 homes to buildings in downtown Minneapolis and Target Field.

Residents and businesses in Hennepin County generate 1 million tons of garbage every year. Processing waste at HERC is an environmentally preferable alternative to landfilling waste.

More than 11,000 tons of ferrous metal are recovered every year at HERC and recycled.

Processing one ton of waste at HERC prevents the release of one ton of greenhouse gas emissions. Since HERC opened in 1990, processing waste has prevented the release of 3 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

Is burning garbage really the best way to a) manage our waste without landfilling it? and/or b) generate electricity or other forms of energy? Whatever happened to the recycling, composting and reducing waste targets developed years ago now? Is this WTE – waste-to-energy – system the healthiest alternative?

Burned materials of all kinds pour pollutants into the air we breathe – and choke on, creating unprecedented percentages of respiratory problems in children and adults, especially adults with chronic health problems.

Lead, cadmium and other heavy metals are released into the air over Minneapolis and blow in different directions at different times of the year, settling in the systems of residents all around the Twin Cities. Remember, this is added to other burning and pollutants from other sources, including energy and manufacturing companies dotting the Metro.

Even with all the money generated for Hennepin County by this burning operation, can the health protection mandate of the county and the state justify such data as an 11.4% rate of children’s asthma in Minneapolis or 9.2% county-wide?

Two years ago, the Minneapolis Planning Commission bucked its own staff’s recommendation and turned down Covanta’s and Hennepin’s request for changing the city’s conditional use permit to allow for the increased burning. Covanta started to appeal that decision to the City Council, but could see the media coverage and count the votes on the City Council Zoning and Planning Committee and pulled it back to consult with the Pollution Control Agency about modifying THAT permit to burn.

Their appeal was coming up again in Minneapolis this month - now they’ve asked for another extension for that – to October. Anti-burning advocates and other environmentalists are pressing hard to keep any more garbage from being burnt there, insisting that all burning, not just the increase, is killing people. (Watch an interview between guests Lara Norkus-Crampton and Rep. Frank Hornstein.)

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with anti burner and anti-burning advocates and two of the legislators who support them.

GUESTS:

State Rep. FRANK HORNSTEIN (DFL-Mpls) – Minnesota House Ways and Means; M.A., urban and environmental policy

LARA NORKUS-CRAMPTON, RN – Public Health Nurse; former member, Minneapolis Planning Commission; Anti-HERC Advocate

ALAN MULLER – Executive Director, Green Delaware; Anti-burning advocate

PLUS: Troubadour LARRY LONG sings his latest song: "Generations 2 Come". This song was written with help from artist Jan Attridge and advocates Diadra Decker, Marco Good and Betsy Bowen.  (Recording comes at about 50 minutes into the show.)


55:37 minutes (50.93 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon. Feb 6@9AM: WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH ALEC?: Corporations Control Our Democracy–KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post on TruthToTell’sFacebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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TruthToTell, Mon. Feb 6@9AM: WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH ALEC?: Corporations Control Our Democracy–KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

 

This is the stuff of novels and conspiracy films.

The once obscure, even friendly-sounding acronym for an equally innocuous corporate name – ALEC – for the American Legislative Exchange Council – has suddenly been thrown into the glare of exposure lately. ALEC-controlled state legislators across the country are literally flooding their bodies with bills designed to seize the moment – that moment in time when the upheaval in legislative membership has given us Republican majorities in Wisconsin, Indiana, Florida, Ohio, Kansas, among others – to pass wildly radical rightwing reforms of various states’ educational priorities and constructs, environmental and energy production regulations, access to elections and other voting rights, increasing imprisonment in the service of privatizing prisons, undermining universal health care, and other issues made visible by governors and lawmakers like Wisconsin’s.

Thousands of state legislators – overwhelmingly Republican – past and present, mostly present, are members of this heretofore secret and very powerful brotherhood. Now, they openly recruit members. That is matched by corporate members and their lobbyists and together they are writing the laws they want to govern us from here on out.

In Minnesota, former Republican Secretary of State, now state Representative Mary Kiffmeyer is ALEC’s state chairperson here. Other prominent Minnesota Senators and Representatives are ALEC operatives in their respective chambers – eight current senators and eighteen House members that we know of, including Senate President Pro Tem and Education Chair, Gen Olson,Speaker of the House Kurt Zellers and the two primary Education chairs, Reps. Pat Garofalo and Sondra Erickson.

This is the tip of the ALEC/Corporate cartel iceberg. The rest is well below the surface – some would say underground, including the 30-year history of gradually changing the face of the United States and Minnesota’s culture of divisive and exclusionary politics and social and educational policy. And we examine the effects of this organizations on Minnesota’s legal, electoral and educational landscape with three counter-advocates working with several others to expose this axis of rightwing corruption of our democracy and the very Constitution itself – part of it employing our public police forces to protect their secrecy and to arrest dissenters, even the journalists covering them.

Leading us ahead are published reports and curricula describing this secret society phenomenon in detail – one of the key reports, Common Cause Minnesota's Legislating Under the Influence: How Corporations Write State Laws in Minnesota.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with those advocates as we continue our series of programs opening the doors of groups and individuals out to undermine this core tenets of a document already thrown under the bus in the pursuit of profits and political control.

GUESTS:

 MARY CECCONI – Executive Director, Parents United for Public Schools (website under renovation)

 CARLA FERRUCCI – Executive Director, Minnesota Association for Justice (formerly MN Trial Lawyers Assn.)

MIKE DEAN – Executive Director, Common Cause Minnesota

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TruthToTell Jan 30: TEACHER CONTRACTS(cont’d) & GRAD ASSISTANT UNIONIZING–LISTEN/DOWNLOADHERE

Last time, we included representatives from the Minneapolis teachers union – the Minneapolis Federation of Teachers – the long-standing bargaining unit for those standing in front of our kids. This week, those reps found themselves forced to withdraw by personal circumstances, so we’re bringing back the critics and hope to clarify their positions. Those stakeholder groups - like Action for Equity and Put Kids First Minneapolis started attending the meetings and, in no uncertain terms insisted that, as progressives who support collective bargaining and closing the gaps. In coalition with others, and calling it "Contract for Student Achievement," they advanced five key ideas for last Fall’s bargaining. They, and their ideas for reforms, ran into a brick wall, essentially dismissed as interlopers with no business being part of the process. We talk with our returning advocates.

In Segment Two, we learn about the effort to organize University of Minnesota Graduate Assistants into a UAW local (GSWU/UAW). Grad Assistants are those research and teaching aides who do much of the work collecting and imparting knowledge to undergraduates and other graduate students while administrating classes and compiling data for professors and instructors as they work their own way toward masters degrees and PhD.

GUESTS:

LYNNELL MICKELSEN – Co-Founder of Put Kids First Minneapolis and one of the authors of the Contract for Student Achievement

CHRIS STEWART – former Minneapolis School Board Member; CEO, Action for Equity; and Co-Chair, Education Work Group of the African-American Leadership Forum

SARA NELSON – Teaching Assistant, Geography, UofM – Spokesperson, UAW Grad Student local

SCOTT THALLER – Research Assistant, Physics, UofM – Spokesperson, UAW Grad Student local

TruthToTell Feb 6: WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH ALEC?: Corporations Control Our Democracy–LISTEN BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 02/06/2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is the stuff of novels and conspiracy films.

The once obscure, even friendly-sounding acronym for an equally innocuous corporate name – ALEC – for the American Legislative Exchange Council – has suddenly been thrown into the glare of exposure lately. ALEC-controlled state legislators across the country are literally flooding their bodies with bills designed to seize the moment – that moment in time when the upheaval in legislative membership has given us Republican majorities in Wisconsin, Indiana, Florida, Ohio, Kansas, among others – to pass wildly radical rightwing reforms of various states’ educational priorities and constructs, environmental and energy production regulations, access to elections and other voting rights, increasing imprisonment in the service of privatizing prisons, undermining universal health care, and other issues made visible by governors and lawmakers like Wisconsin’s.

Thousands of state legislators – overwhelmingly Republican – past and present, mostly present, are members of this heretofore secret and very powerful brotherhood. Now, they openly recruit members. That is matched by corporate members and their lobbyists and together they are writing the laws they want to govern us from here on out.

In Minnesota, former Republican Secretary of State, now state Representative Mary Kiffmeyer is ALEC’s state chairperson here. Other prominent Minnesota Senators and Representatives are ALEC operatives in their respective chambers – eight current senators and eighteen House members that we know of, including Senate President Pro Tem and Education Chair, Gen Olson, Speaker of the House Kurt Zellers and the two primary Education chairs, Reps. Pat Garofalo and Sondra Erickson.

This is the tip of the ALEC/Corporate cartel iceberg. The rest is well below the surface – some would say underground, including the 30-year history of gradually changing the face of the United States and Minnesota’s culture of divisive and exclusionary politics and social and educational policy. And we examine the effects of this organizations on Minnesota’s legal, electoral and educational landscape with three counter-advocates working with several others to expose this axis of rightwing corruption of our democracy and the very Constitution itself – part of it employing our public police forces to protect their secrecy and to arrest dissenters, even the journalists covering them.

Leading us ahead are published reports and curricula describing this secret society phenomenon in detail – one of the key reports, Common Cause Minnesota's Legislating Under the Influence: How Corporations Write State Laws in Minnesota.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with those advocates as we continue our series of programs opening the doors of groups and individuals out to undermine this core tenets of a document already thrown under the bus in the pursuit of profits and political control.

GUESTS:

MARY CECCONI – Executive Director, Parents United for Public Schools (website under renovation)

CARLA FERRUCCI – Executive Director, Minnesota Association for Justice (formerly MN Trial Lawyers Assn.)

MIKE DEAN – Executive Director, Common Cause Minnesota

ALSO:

Peace Studies PROF. JACK NELSON-PALLMEYER Joins us to talk about the

Minnesota Arms Spending Alternatives Project (MN ASAP)


58:52 minutes (53.9 MB)

TruthToTell Nov 25, 2009: MARV DAVIDOV w Carol Masters: You Can’t Do That! AUDIO HERE

On-air date: 
Wed, 11/25/2009

January 14, 2012: Yesterday, knowing the end was near, lifelong peace and justice activist Marv Davidov surrounded himself with family and several friends from the old trenches to say goodbye, even to talk briefly with a reporter from the StarTribune. Partying along and celebrating their time together, he died later that day, no regrets for almost al of it, save, perhaps for the successes that elude us all in a culture of war and corporate greed. Most of us will depart this vale having failed to effect all of the change we know to be necessary for a people's survival, but many of us will simply run out of the intellectual and emotional energy that never left Davidov, despite his failing body.

Just over two years ago, Davidov and his collaborator and close ally and friend, Carol Masters penned his biography, You Can't Do That! A perfect title for a lifetime of resistance. Posted below is the original airing of the interview we recorded with Marv and Carol a few days earlier. Ever up to his wisecracks, Marv tells his story

November 25, 2009:

Andy Driscoll probes the mind and motives of Marv Davidov – a near icon of nonviolent resistance and revolution here, but also everywhere across the country for nearly 57 years. Known primarily in these parts – at least among the general public – as the founding inspiration for the war-resistant action group, The Honeywell Project.

Starting in 1968 and 1969, dozens of Project protestors were arrested after jumping the fences during demonstrations against Minneapolis Honeywell’s Defense Systems division in Minneapolis railing against that company’s manufacture of the cluster bomb – a nasty little device that, when lobbed into an area where people congregate – soldiers or civilians - would detonate and scatter-shoot thousands of shotgun pellet-type missiles to maximize its kill of human beings, not just to destroy military buildings or materiel. Of course, its greatest impact was almost always on civilians, theoretically not an announced target in wars between military powers.

The Honeywell Project and its latest incarnation now known as the Alliant Technology Resistance have hammered on war materiel manufacturing around here for 40 years. But Marv Davidov, despite his loss of kidney function and under dialysis three hours a day, three days per week, hangs in there – not always everyone’s darling, but admired by all for his persistence and his courage in the face of violent counterforce over the last half-century. His dialysis on Wednesdays at our usual broadcast time forced us to pre-record Marv and his biographer, Carol Masters, between dialysis days. We sat down with them yesterday, and to no one’s surprise, Marv was ever on his game.

Before the Honeywell Project, Marv’s was a deep background of nonviolent revolution in the 50’s and 60s – including Freedom Rider work to Mississippi and prison, then, later, walking from Canada to Cuba right at about the time of the Bay of Pigs debacle during the Kennedy Administration. That walk brought more grief, pain and jailings from white supremacists in still-rebellious Georgia as the marcher tried combining civil rights in the US with peace promotion toward Cuba. Marv spins his tails and we hear excerpts from Carol Masters’ biography, Marv Davidov: You Can’t Do That!

Guests:

MARV DAVIDOV - Nonviolent Revolutionary, Peace and Social Justic Advocate, Founder, The Honeywell Project

CAROL MASTERS - Peace and Social Justic Advocate, collaborator, Marv Davidov: You Can’t Do That!


60:15 minutes (27.59 MB)

LAST CHANCE DAY - QUICK - HELP CIVIC-MEDIA AMPLIFY YOUR COMMUNITY’S VOICES- AND TAKE A DEDUCTION, TOO!

Remember, CivicMedia and TruthToTell is your your link to real discussions about important issues affecting your community, your city, your state - and tackles the tough questions most other media won't touch - and we involve you in every discussion.

PLEASE help us continue this work! Donate Today and take a deduction this year!

TruthToTell and CivicMedia-Minnesota - Partners in Amplifying Community Voices and Issues - PLEASE GIVE

On-air date: 
Mon, 12/26/2011

Over more than five years, CivicMedia and KFAI have brought you over 300 conversations about the critical issues our communities face on a daily and weekly basis in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Now, as 2011 comes to a close, you can score a year-end tax deduction by donating to our parent CivicMedia-Minnesota, and we'll do an even better job, we know.

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DONATE to CIVICMEDIA-MINNESOTA HERE!  And THANK YOU!

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55:43 minutes (51.01 MB)

TruthToTell, Dec 26: RAMSEY COUNTY STADIUM PETITION - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 12/26/2011

Over more than five years, CivicMedia and KFAI have brought you over 300 conversations about the critical issues our communities face on a daily and weekly basis in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Now, as 2011 comes to a close, you can score a year-end tax deduction by donating to our parent CivicMedia-Minnesota, and we'll do an even better job, we know.

PLEASE HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST –

DONATE to CIVICMEDIA-MINNESOTA HERE!  And THANK YOU!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We, the undersigned registered voters in Ramsey County, hereby petition the Ramsey County Board of Commissioners for the purpose of enacting an ordinance, as follows:

Ramsey County shall be prohibited from making expenditures, incurring debt, or entering into any agreement, directly or indirectly, related to a stadium on the TCAAP* site in Arden Hills.

Advancing an initiative petition for an ordinance preventing Ramsey County from taxing county residents to finance a Vikings stadium on the former *Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant site in Arden Hills is Ady Wickstrom, a current councilmember in the nearby suburb of Shoreview. She’s not alone in her quest. Other councilmembers and mayors in other Ramsey County municipalities, St. Paul included, support the initiative of NoStadiumTax, which would, if the proper number of signatures are collected and verified, be placed on the 2012 election ballot.

A slim majority of the Ramsey County Board has been pushing a $1.2 billion combination development deal with Minnesota Vikings ownership to clean and fill that polluted site with an entertainment, hospitality and residential complex, including a massive stadium with moveable roof. First, they proposed a .5% increase in local sales taxes (with nothing from other Metro counties), which was dead on arrival in both the Governor’s office and the Legislature. Now comes a proposal to tax food and beverages a 3% tax to fund the county share, a preliminary approval coming last week by a 4-3 vote.

Ramsey County is the only one of Minnesota’s 87 counties with a home rule charter of its own – the county’s version of a municipal constitution – and, as such, its governance is subject not just to state law, but to its own specific code of laws county voters approved some 15 years ago, right after legislators gave counties the option of doing so.

The charter allows for initiative, referendum and recall (I&R) – the three legs of citizen democracy usually exercised when elected officials, in this case the county board of commissioners, are viewed as unresponsive to the public will. The Ramsey County initiative process is convoluted – much more so than in many states. Ady Wickstrom will explain it to us, but her job and that of her supporters is to secure signatures from Ramsey County registered voters equal to 10 percent of those who voted for President of the United States in the last general election. 27,817 signatures are required this time around, given the Presidential votes of 2008. Several steps intervene first, including a chance for the County Board vote to pass it themselves. Not likely. The primary movers on the Board, Tony Bennett and Rafael Ortega, are unavailable Monday, but we’ll re-visit this item when things heat up over the next several months.

GUEST:

STADIUM PETITION:  ADY WICKSTROM –  Shoreview City Councilmember; past president, Arden Hills/Shoreview Rotary; Leading the NoStadiumTax initiative

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Ramsey County Board of Commissioners

Ramsey County Home Rule Charter

Minnesota Vikings

 


55:43 minutes (51.01 MB)

TruthToTell, Dec 26: HUNGER BOOK - AUDIO BELOW

On-air date: 
Mon, 12/26/2011

Over more than five years, CivicMedia and KFAI have brought you over 300 conversations about the critical issues our communities face on a daily and weekly basis in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Now, as 2011 comes to a close, you can score a year-end tax deduction by donating to our parent CivicMedia-Minnesota, and we'll do an even better job, we know.

PLEASE HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST –

DONATE to CIVICMEDIA-MINNESOTA HERE!  And THANK YOU!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A series of Christmas stories published and sold as a way of beefing up the fight against hunger in Minnesota plus a brief chat with the leader of a petition to stop Ramsey County’s pursuit of a Vikings stadium in Arden Hills are our post-Christmas/end-of-Chanukah discussions come Monday.

The Christmas stories, penned over several years by St. Paul author and education activist Roger Barr, center on the Bartholomews of St. Paul and the odyssey their family crèche endures each year, including its partial destruction at least one year. We follow Matt, Deidre, Allison and Christopher Bartholomew as well as Matt’s brother, Tim, through their Christmas adventures in Barr’s book, Getting Ready for Christmas and Other Stories – twelve others, to be exact, over a 13-Christmas period. Things said and unsaid over the years pile up toward the end until everything spills out to reveal histories for both Matt and Deidre neither had addressed, despite the years and two children spent together.

Barr is putting all the receipts of the book’s sales toward the Emergency Food Shelf Network and the quest to provide 100,000 meals to EFSN and toward eradicating hunger. We talk about the plague of hunger in this most prosperous of countries where the imbalance between the rich and everyone else grows greater every day, felt most acutely as these holiday season come ‘round yet again and very little has been done thus far.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We, the undersigned registered voters in Ramsey County, hereby petition the Ramsey County Board of Commissioners for the purpose of enacting an ordinance, as follows:

Ramsey County shall be prohibited from making expenditures, incurring debt, or entering into any agreement, directly or indirectly, related to a stadium on the TCAAP* site in Arden Hills.

Advancing an initiative petition for an ordinance preventing Ramsey County from taxing county residents to finance a Vikings stadium on the former US Army ammunition plant site in Arden Hills is Ady Wickstrom, a current councilmember in the nearby suburb of Shoreview. She’s not alone in her quest. Other councilmembers and mayors in other Ramsey County municipalities, St. Paul included, support the initiative of NoStadiumTax, which would, if the proper number of signatures are collected and verified, be placed on the 2012 election ballot.

A slim majority of the Ramsey County Board has been pushing a $1.2 billion combination development deal with Minnesota Vikings ownership to clean and fill that polluted site with an entertainment, hospitality and residential complex, including a massive stadium with moveable roof. First, they proposed a .5% increase in local sales taxes (with nothing from other Metro counties), which was dead on arrival in both the Governor’s office and the Legislature. Now comes a proposal to tax food and beverages a 3% tax to fund the county share, a preliminary approval coming last week by a 4-3 vote.

Ramsey County is the only one of Minnesota’s 87 counties with a home rule charter of its own – the county’s version of a municipal constitution – and, as such, its governance is subject not just to state law, but to its own specific code of laws county voters approved some 15 years ago, right after legislators gave counties the option of doing so.

The charter allows for initiative, referendum and recall (I&R) – the three legs of citizen democracy usually exercised when elected officials, in this case the county board of commissioners, are viewed as unresponsive to the public will. The Ramsey County initiative process is convoluted – much more so than in many states. Ady Wickstrom will explain it to us, but her job and that of her supporters is to secure signatures from Ramsey County registered voters equal to 10 percent of those who voted for President of the United States in the last general election. 27,817 signatures are required this time around, given the Presidential votes of 2008. Several steps intervene first, including a chance for the County Board vote to pass it themselves. Not likely. The primary movers on the Board, Tony Bennett and Rafael Ortega, are unavailable Monday, but we’ll re-visit this item when things heat up over the next several months.

GUESTS:

HUNGER: ROGER BARR – Fiction and Nonfiction Writer; Playwright; Author, Getting Ready for Christmas and Other StoriesExecutive Director, Support Our Schools

ADDITIONAL HUNGER LINKS:

Emergency Food Shelf Network

Hunger-Free Minnesota - a large coalition of food shelves and networks - CLICK TO REACH SPECIFIC SITES

Hunger Solutions Minnesota – provides food to those in need, advancing sound public policy, and guiding grassroots advocacy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

STADIUM PETITION:  ADY WICKSTROM –  Shoreview City Councilmember; past president, Arden Hills/Shoreview Rotary; Leading the NoStadiumTax initiative

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Ramsey County Board of Commissioners

Ramsey County Home Rule Charter

Minnesota Vikings

 


55:43 minutes (51.01 MB)

TruthToTell, Mon., Dec 26 @9AM: HUNGER BOOK / STADIUM PETITION; TTT Dec 19: CRYSTAL SUGAR LOCKOUT: No Sweet Deal on the Table

Over more tha five years, CivicMedia and KFAI have brought you over 300 conversations about the critical issues our communities face on a daily and weekly basis in the Twin Cities and Minnesota. Now, as 2011 comes to a close, you can score a year-end tax deduction by donating to our parent CivicMedia-Minnesota, and we'll do an even better job, we know.

PLEASE HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST –

DONATE to CIVICMEDIA-MINNESOTA HERE!  And THANK YOU!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Dec 26 @9AM: HUNGER BOOK / STADIUM PETITION

A series of Christmas stories published and sold as a way of beefing up the fight against hunger in Minnesota plus a brief chat with the leader of a petition to stop Ramsey County’s pursuit of a Vikings stadium in Arden Hills are our post-Christmas/end-of-Chanukah discussions come Monday.

 


The Christmas stories, penned over several years by St. Paul author and education activist Roger Barr, center on the Bartholomews of St. Paul and the odyssey their family crèche endures each year, including its partial destruction at least one year. We follow Matt, Deidre, Allison and Christopher Bartholomew as well as Matt’s brother, Tim, through their Christmas adventures in Barr’s book, Getting Ready for Christmas and Other Stories – twelve others, to be exact, over a 13-Christmas period. Things said and unsaid over the years pile up toward the end until everything spills out to reveal histories for both Matt and Deidre neither had addressed, despite the years and two children spent together.

Barr is putting all the receipts of the book’s sales toward the Emergency Food Shelf Network and the quest to provide 100,000 meals to EFSN and toward eradicating hunger. We talk about the plague of hunger in this most prosperous of countries where the imbalance between the rich and everyone else grows greater every day, felt most acutely as these holiday season come ‘round yet again and very little has been done thus far.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We, the undersigned registered voters in Ramsey County, hereby petition the Ramsey County Board of Commissioners for the purpose of enacting an ordinance, as follows:

Ramsey County shall be prohibited from making expenditures, incurring debt, or entering into any agreement, directly or indirectly, related to a stadium on the TCAAP* site in Arden Hills.

Advancing an initiative petition for an ordinance preventing Ramsey County from taxing county residents to finance a Vikings stadium on the former US Army ammunition plant site in Arden Hills is Ady Wickstrom, a current councilmember in the nearby suburb of Shoreview. She’s not alone in her quest. Other councilmembers and mayors in other Ramsey County municipalities, St. Paul included, support the initiative of NoStadiumTax, which would, if the proper number of signatures are collected and verified, be placed on the 2012 election ballot.

A slim majority of the Ramsey County Board has been pushing a $1.2 billion combination development deal with Minnesota Vikings ownership to clean and fill that polluted site with an entertainment, hospitality and residential complex, including a massive stadium with moveable roof. First, they proposed a .5% increase in local sales taxes (with nothing from other Metro counties), which was dead on arrival in both the Governor’s office and the Legislature. Now comes a proposal to tax food and beverages a 3% tax to fund the county share, a preliminary approval coming last week by a 4-3 vote.

Ramsey County is the only one of Minnesota’s 87 counties with a home rule charter of its own – the county’s version of a municipal constitution – and, as such, its governance is subject not just to state law, but to its own specific code of laws county voters approved some 15 years ago, right after legislators gave counties the option of doing so.

The charter allows for initiative, referendum and recall (I&R) – the three legs of citizen democracy usually exercised when elected officials, in this case the county board of commissioners, are viewed as unresponsive to the public will. The Ramsey Countyinitiative process is convoluted – much more so than in many states. Ady Wickstrom will explain it to us, but her job and that of her supporters is to secure signatures from Ramsey County registered voters equal to 10 percent of those who voted for President of the United States in the last general election. 27,817 signatures are required this time around, given the Presidential votes of 2008. Several steps intervene first, including a chance for the County Board vote to pass it themselves. Not likely. The primary movers on the Board, Tony Bennett and Rafael Ortega, are unavailable Monday, but we’ll re-visit this item when things heat up over the next several months.

GUESTS:

 HUNGER: ROGER BARR – Fiction and Nonfiction Writer; Playwright; Author, Getting Ready for Christmas and Other StoriesExecutive Director, Support Our Schools

 STADIUM PETITION: ADY WICKSTROM –  Shoreview City Councilmember; past president, Arden Hills/Shoreview Rotary; Leading the NoStadiumTax initiative

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Dec 19 @9AM: CRYSTAL SUGAR LOCKOUT: No Sweet Deal on the Table - AUDIO HERE


This final week before Christmas brings into sharper relief than usual the plight of giant Red River cooperative American Crystal Sugar’s lockout of its 1,300 workers – still going as it has since August 1, the day after the members of the consolidated union, Bakery, Confectionery and Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers (BCTGM), rejected the company’s final offer by a 96% margin. Talks are suspended, despite Governor Mark Dayton's letter offering to help with negotiations. The company did not respond and a federal mediator asked that the Governor not be involved. Crystal has plants in both Minnesota and North Dakota.

This is a break with the long company tradition of cooperation between the long-time farmer-owned sugar beet processing co-op and its organized workers. This was hardly the time to leave the bargaining table, but American Crystal Sugar’s management, especially President/CEO Dave Berg and his chief administrative VP, Brian Ingulsrud, have decided, they say, to go with replacement workers, all of them nonunion and inexperienced, according to insiders.

*SUGARBEET PROCESSING TO CRYSTALINE SUGAR:

Lockouts appear to be the coming thing as a way to pressure already stressed workers into caving into company demands that wage cuts, health care burdens and reduced pensions all be accepted as concessions to the lousy economic times the company claims are stifling profits. It seems contrary to reports since the lockout began that American Crystal enjoys record profits after a banner crop of sugar beets and significant contracts for their sugar product as well as a fair jump in pay granted to senior executives.

The issues here are rippling across Minnesota and North Dakota as unemployment compensation benefits dry up for the Minnesota-side workers. North Dakota’s workers remain out of work without unemployment benefits because of the definition that state’s laws give the type of work stoppage at American Crystal.

Fewer and fewer American workers are creating the goods and performing the services we consume. Most of the core work of this society is being shipped elsewhere, reducing real income and economic stability for those left behind. Like the P-9 union working for Hormel Meats in Austin, the sugar workers and the farmers who own Crystal Sugar for decades enjoyed a symbiotic relationship. This is disintegrating in the current climate, a climate that leads to statements like that uttered by Crystal CEO in effect, they say, likening the workers to “a 21-pound cancerous tumor.”

As unions membership diminishes and strikes and lockouts have left even fewer workers members of unions, rank and file workers and their leadership have shown a willingness to ignore long-term effects of their work on environments and health as long as work is created.

“Jobs!” has become the rallying cry for conservatives and corporations insisting that if government and workers fail to yield to demanded concessions and bailouts, everyone will be out of a job. This sort of thing scares politicians and a jobless workforce into conceding and redirecting wealth to the already wealthy. In fact, more union members are voting for Republicans or Tea Party candidates these days than their traditional cheerleading Democrats.

What are the issues causing such a serious split between this huge cooperative and its workers? Is it possible to resolve this dispute as long as a lockout is allowed and replacement workers hired? What is the definition of a cooperative like Crystal Sugar? (Land-O-Lakes, Cenex and Great River Energy are also large coops.) The BCTGM is a consolidation of several unions seeking strength in numbers. Where is that strength in the face of the company’s lockout tactic?

Where will this take us? Have corporations grown so large and powerful and unions less and less relevant that fair resolution of labor stoppages is less likely now and later?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and guest co-host PROF. TOM O’CONNELL will ask this week’s guests these questions and more.

GUESTS:

MARK FROEMKE – President, AFL-CIO West Minnesota Area Labor Council and Representative of the Bakery, Confectionery and Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers (BCTGM) Union

NIEL RITCHIE – Executive Director, League of Rural Voters

Our attempts to invite American Crystal Sugar executives CEO DAVE BERG and Vice President of Administration BRIAN INGULSRUD were unsuccessful.