Black Lives Matter (So Does White Support)

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On-air date: 
Mon, 09/14/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Through a series of dramatic demonstrations across the country, the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the troubled relationship between police and African-Americans here in the Twin Cities and across the nation. Polls show that more white Americans are now aware that unjustified acts of police directed at African-Americans do occur. At the same time, as has often happened when African-Americans and other oppressed groups organize to assert their rights, a backlash has emerged.

One striking feature of the Black Lives Matter movement has been the multi-racial composition of its demonstrations. Clearly, there are many whites and members of other ethnic communities who support the movement. But beyond marching, what role can allies play? 

Joining Truth to Tell to discuss this question are two people who are working in partnership with Black Lives Matter Minneapolis to organize white people working for racial justice in the Twin Cities area. Denise Konen, parent educator and active member of the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis works primarily with faith leaders and members of religious communities. They have been supporting the Mall of America protestors who face legal charges from the city of  Bloomington.

Kathleen Cole, an assistant professor of social science at Metropolitan State University, is an active member of SURJ, a secular group that is going door to door talking to white people about Black Lives Matter in North Minneapolis’s 4th Ward—the area represented by Minneapolis City Council President Barbara Johnson. The goal is to engage people in a conversation about the movement and create a visible presence of supporters.

www.blacklivesmatter.com

www.facebook.com/blacklivesmatter

On-air guests: 

Denise Konen, parent educator and active member of the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis works primarily with faith leaders and members of religious communities. They have been supporting the Mall of America protestors who face legal charges from the city of  Bloomington.

Kathleen Cole, an assistant professor of social science at Metropolitan State University, is an active member of SURJ, a secular group that is going door to door talking to white people about Black Lives Matter in North Minneapolis’s 4th Ward—the area represented by Minneapolis City Council President Barbara Johnson. The goal is to engage people in a conversation about the movement and create a visible presence of supporters.